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May 27, 2011
There's a little bit more to that fish tale I gave you the other day. Karen Blair, a longtime aide whom William Donald Schaefer remembered in his will, recalled how she'd gotten roped into playing a mermaid at the National Aquarium groundbreaking in 1978. I indicated that the gig came Blair's way because the model hired to play the mermaid showed up with such heavy make-up and done-up hair that she might have made a better siren for The Block than lure for a family-friendly attraction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
There are still tickets left for Mermaid Kiss: Oyster Fest 2013, the Oyster Recovery Partnership's Oct. 1 fundraiser at the National Aquarium. The event is a showcase of cuisine prepared by members of the organization's Shell Recycling Alliance. More than 100 area restaurants, caterers and seafood wholesalers participate in the program by recycling their used oyster shells. The shells are used to restore oyster reefs and as bedding material for raising new oysters. The business-casual evening event includes lots of freshly shucked oysters, live music, hors d'oeuvres, and private access to aquarium exhibits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 25, 2011
William Donald Schaefer remembered many people in his will, but only one mermaid. Karen Blair , a longtime aide who received $10,000 in the will made public last week, was a City Hall secretary in August 1978 when the city was about to break ground for the aquarium. A model had been hired to appear as a mermaid, but she showed up that day without the requisite fresh-from-the-sea look. “She came in and she had all this make-up on and her hair was all piled up high,” Blair said.
EXPLORE
April 29, 2013
Harford Dance Theatre will perform The Little Mermaid in Harford Community College's Chesapeake Theater Thursday and Friday, May 16 and 17 at 7p.m., Saturday, May 18 at 3 and 7 p.m., and Sunday, May 19 at 1 and 4 p.m. Based on the magical tale by Hans Christian Andersen, the stage comes to life with colorful fish, sparkling seahorses, a wicked sea witch and evil sea monkeys in a fun-filled retelling of the story of a young mermaid who gives up...
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 8, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- The Little Mermaid, re-released on a special edition DVD, became an instant family classic when it first hit theaters in 1989, and 17 years later, actress Jodi Benson articulates its enduring appeal. It's "a classic fairy tale, the first one for our studio since Sleeping Beauty in '61," says Benson, who provided the voice of the title character. "But then to add the music to it, you know, to really make it like a Broadway musical, is what makes it so magical." Composer Alan Menken, who won Oscars for the film's score as well as the original song "Under the Sea" with lyricist Howard Ashman, sees much to identify with in the tale of the mermaid Ariel who falls for a human despite her father's disapproval.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | February 27, 2008
OH, God, I'm so excited. I'm getting a new tail!" These were the first words out of the mouth of the lovely Sierra Boggess when I met the star of Broadway's big hit, The Little Mermaid, at the Disney offices on Manhattan's Seventh Avenue. Miss Boggess is a true child of show biz. She was a skating phenom as a kid -- Dainty June on ice -- and was plucked from the lavish Las Vegas production of Phantom of the Opera to become the star of Mermaid. She is not, despite her experience, a tough cookie, just ... appetizingly chewy.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2003
Margaret Gail, a swimmer once known as the "singing mermaid," died of congestive heart failure Oct. 3 at Stella Maris Hospice. The Timonium resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised on Pimlico Road in Mount Washington, the former Margaret Russell was a 1939 graduate of Western High School. By her teens, she was a Red Cross lifesaving examiner. She also taught swimming at the city's Patterson and Gwynns Falls park pools. "She was a born swimmer," said her sister, Maureen Skinner of Timonium.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1997
The descent into madness began in 1989. It was the year we lost control of our children, the year the oversized mitts of Mickey Mouse grabbed us by our bank accounts and refused to let go.Since then, a few parents were able to forget the madness. Through 12-step programs and the help of loyal loving friends, we were able to put 1989 behind us. Until now."The Little Mermaid" -- which in 1989 marked Disney's return to movie-animation world domination -- is back. "Only Disney. Only in theaters through Nov. 30," the chipper print ads read.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | March 1, 1992
Although it helped make him a fortune, Phineas Taylor Barnum admitted that he wasn't too proud of the spectacle: this tiny monkey severed at the waist and stitched to the mummified tail of a fish.But even the world's greatest showman couldn't have expected that little girls in Baltimore would burst into tears over Barnum's "Feejee mermaid" 101 years after his death."We've had a lot of children come here expecting to see the Little Mermaid or the cute mermaid on the tuna can -- and they look at this and cry their eyes out," said a publicist for the Peale Museum, which is exhibiting the monstrous wonder at its Holliday Street museum.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW | May 4, 1991
The secret to making good children's films is to not make movies that are just for children. They have to engage adults, too, and the knack for doing that seems a prime reason for the enduring success of Walt Disney Studios.The point is worth noting today because "The Little Mermaid," the 1989 animated adventure which became the highest grossing Disney animated film ever, makes its cable debut this weekend on the Disney Channel premium service (at 7 p.m. tomorrow). The videotape also recently hit the stores.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
With its spring production of Disney's "The Little Mermaid Jr.," the Children's Theatre of Annapolis has found an ideal vehicle to reach its goal of presenting shows highlighting young performers' talents. This shortened version of the 2008 Broadway stage play, adapted from Disney's 1989 animated blockbuster, makes full use of its 40-player cast, whose ages range from 8 to 14. The show debuts Friday as part of Children's Theatre's 53rd year. Veteran director Jerry Vess, who has led seven Annapolis Summer Garden productions, marks his fifth directorial assignment for Children's Theatre with "Mermaid," having also directed "Aladdin," "Wizard of Oz," "The Emperor's New Clothes" and last season's "Alice in Wonderland.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
She had won a string of beauty pageants - and was the original St. Pauli Girl of beer advertising fame - so Debbie Walker, a blond model from Washington, D.C., was accustomed to her fair share of attention. But she'd never seen anything like the morning of July 15, 1981. She had to wear a skin-tight, sequined costume with a 15-foot train for that gig. A team of frogmen carried her across a makeshift pond and placed her on a rock. And as cameras from media outlets around the world clicked, flashed and rolled, three seals swam over to pay her a visit, followed by an equally frisky mayor of Baltimore, William Donald Schaefer.
FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, Baltimore Sun Media Group | November 17, 2012
Wedding day: Oct. 20, 2012 Her story: Devin Robinson, 24, grew up in Baltimore. She is an auditor for Ellin & Tucker, a public accounting and business-consulting firm. Her father, Dwayne Robinson, works in sales for Verizon, and her mother, Bobbie Robinson, is an underwriter for Blue Cross & Blue Shield. His story: Joey Rumph Jr., 27, grew up in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. He is a technical recruiter. His mother, Sherri Coval, is a homemaker and his father, Tony Rumph, is a police officer in Boca Raton, Fla. Their story: Devin and Joey met at Jacksonville University in Jacksonville, Fla., when Devin was a freshman and Joey was a junior.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2011
There's a little bit more to that fish tale I gave you the other day. Karen Blair, a longtime aide whom William Donald Schaefer remembered in his will, recalled how she'd gotten roped into playing a mermaid at the National Aquarium groundbreaking in 1978. I indicated that the gig came Blair's way because the model hired to play the mermaid showed up with such heavy make-up and done-up hair that she might have made a better siren for The Block than lure for a family-friendly attraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 25, 2011
William Donald Schaefer remembered many people in his will, but only one mermaid. Karen Blair , a longtime aide who received $10,000 in the will made public last week, was a City Hall secretary in August 1978 when the city was about to break ground for the aquarium. A model had been hired to appear as a mermaid, but she showed up that day without the requisite fresh-from-the-sea look. “She came in and she had all this make-up on and her hair was all piled up high,” Blair said.
HEALTH
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
As she chugs through the water, Annie Applegarth will never be mistaken for Olympic medalist Katie Hoff. Barbara Thompson will never be in a split-screen comparison to Michael Phelps . The triumph here is that 15 weeks ago, neither woman could swim a lick. Water was to be feared and being in over their heads was almost certain death. "I was terrified," recalls Thompson of her first lesson. "I was climbing down the ladder and clinging to the wall. " But these two middle-aged women and several of their swimming-challenged friends known as the Mermaids will join hundreds of others next Sunday jumping in the open waters off Gibson Island or the Meadowbrook Aquatic Center pool to swim a mile or three for cancer research.
FEATURES
By Ben Brantley and Ben Brantley,New York Times News Service | January 14, 2008
NEW YORK -- Loved the shoes. Loathed the show. OK, I exaggerate. I didn't like the shoes all that much. But the wheel-heeled footwear known as merblades, which allow stage-bound dancers to simulate gliding underwater, provides the only remotely graceful elements in the musical blunderbuss called Disney's The Little Mermaid, which opened last week at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater. A variation on Heelys, a skate hybrid popular among children, merblades endow their wearers with the ability to skim hard surfaces with a near-balletic lightness.
NEWS
June 14, 2000
"I read 'Oh, Tucker!' by Steven Kroll. Tucker is a very happy dog. He moves too fast and knocks over everything in his house. But he loves his family so much, and they love him." -- Jeremy Davis Cross Country Elementary "The book 'Jessica's Mermaid, Sweet Valley Kids' by Molly Mia Stewart is about Jessica, who saw a mermaid. Her friends did not believe her because Jessica always made up stories that were not true. She had to find the mermaid again, or her friends would leave her forever.
TRAVEL
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2009
The winsome statue of Hans Christian Andersen's The Little Mermaid, perched on a rock in Copenhagen's harbor, is hardly the only attraction bidding visitors to Denmark. There's also a place where you can see how you "measure up" to royalty over the centuries. Not far away, you can don Viking clothing and take a seat, oar in hand, in a replica of a Viking ship. My husband and I traveled to Denmark recently to visit my stepdaughter, Julie, when she was spending a semester in Copenhagen, studying at the Danish Institute for Study Abroad as part of her senior year at Goucher College.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | February 27, 2008
OH, God, I'm so excited. I'm getting a new tail!" These were the first words out of the mouth of the lovely Sierra Boggess when I met the star of Broadway's big hit, The Little Mermaid, at the Disney offices on Manhattan's Seventh Avenue. Miss Boggess is a true child of show biz. She was a skating phenom as a kid -- Dainty June on ice -- and was plucked from the lavish Las Vegas production of Phantom of the Opera to become the star of Mermaid. She is not, despite her experience, a tough cookie, just ... appetizingly chewy.
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