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Meriwether Lewis

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January 13, 1998
It was not exactly a groundbreaking decision. In fact, forensic scientist James Starrs calls it "buncombe."Yesterday, Starrs had his long-standing request to dig up the remains of the 19th-century explorer Meriwether Lewis turned down by the National Park Service.Starrs, a George Washington University professor who has exhumed historical figures from Jesse James to Alferd Packer, the Colorado cannibal, believes the remains can resolve the question of whether the 1809 death of Lewis on the Natchez Trace in Tennessee was murder or suicide.
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NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2003
History buffs Larry Chrystal and Susanna Lang retraced the famed expedition of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark several years ago during a 10,000-mile drive through the western United States. Then they read a book about Lewis and Clark's three-year trek. Yesterday, Chrystal and Lang stood under a tent, headphones around their ears, gazing at illustrations of the territory Lewis and Clark explored 200 years ago during a dangerous search for a waterway to the West Coast. "When we saw the expedition was coming here, we had to come," said Lang, an ambulance driver from Severna Park, who was referring to the Corps of Discovery II, the National Park Service's traveling exhibit on Lewis and Clark.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL E. RUANE and MICHAEL E. RUANE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1996
"Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson and the Opening of the American West," by Stephen E. Ambrose. Simon & Schuster. Illustrated. 511 pages. $27.50Late on the afternoon of Oct. 10, 1809, the renowned explorer Meriwether Lewis rode up alone to a log-cabin inn along the old Natchez Trace about 70 miles south of Nashville, Tenn.Looking agitated and sickly, he requested lodging and some whiskey and called for his bear skins and buffalo robe. Inside, he kept to himself, pacing and muttering.
FEATURES
January 13, 1998
It was not exactly a groundbreaking decision. In fact, forensic scientist James Starrs calls it "buncombe."Yesterday, Starrs had his long-standing request to dig up the remains of the 19th-century explorer Meriwether Lewis turned down by the National Park Service.Starrs, a George Washington University professor who has exhumed historical figures from Jesse James to Alferd Packer, the Colorado cannibal, believes the remains can resolve the question of whether the 1809 death of Lewis on the Natchez Trace in Tennessee was murder or suicide.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1995
During his historic cross-country journey with William Clark, the 19th-century explorer Meriwether Lewis charted territory that cartographer had ever recorded.Now the owner of a Howard County farm that she claims Lewis once owned is trying to chart new territory in local zoning law.She is asking that the 90-acre west county property be rezoned from a category that allows development to one that encourages preservation.The Nov. 10 request by owner Frances B. Devlin to change the property from "rural residential" to "rural conservation" represents the first time county zoning officials and developers can remember a property owner asking for more restrictive zoning.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1997
With a yellowed and snaggle-toothed skull in his hands, Professor James E. Starrs struts before his George Washington University law students like Hamlet at the grave of Yorick.He's discussing physical anthropology. But you almost expect him to declaim: "Alas, poor Yorick, I knew him well, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy ..."Dr. Starrs does have a lot of the theatrical about him. He's easily one of America's most famous forensic scientists, an academic sleuth investigating historical mysteries with everything from ground-searching radar to exhumation.
NEWS
March 16, 1997
"Undaunted Courage," by Stephen Ambrose, I just finished it last night. It's beautifully done. It has a phenomenal amount of detail, so it makes the exploration of Meriwether Lewis much more memorable than, say, high school history lessons. Ambrose really brings Lewis alive.I really loved George Eliot's "Adam Bede." It's a novel of England in the 19th century. Her characterization is fantastic. By the end of the book you really feel like you know them,Also "Strange Fruit," by Lillian Smith.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 4, 1997
Meriwether Lewis and William Clark may have gone where none of their brethren had gone before, but Ken Burns is in totally familiar territory tonight on PBS."Lewis & Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) details the incredible journey of Lewis and Clark, who set out in 1804 to explore land where no white man had traveled. Setting out from St. Louis, they were charged by President Thomas Jefferson with exploring the West, mapping it as much as possible, and attempting to discover the fabled Northwest Passage -- an all-water route connecting the Atlantic and Pacific.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Sheila Dresser and Michael Dresser and Sheila Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
GREAT FALLS, Mont. -- Before Capt. Meriwether Lewis saw the Great Falls of the Missouri on June 13, 1805, he heard the roar.What he beheld when he reached the tiny island at the base of the falls astonished him. Here the mighty Missouri River, some 1,500 feet wide and swollen with the snowmelt of the Rockies, fell 78 feet. It was, he wrote in his journal, a "sublimely grand specticle the grandest sight I ever beheld." It was also a crucial moment in the journey, the discovery that dispelled any fear that Lewis and William Clark had taken a wrong turn in their expedition.
NEWS
By Roger Bloom and Roger Bloom,Orange County Register | July 31, 1994
Used to be, a president had to do something pretty egregious to taint his legacy.The pervasive corruption of the Grant and Harding administrations, the wide-ranging criminality of the Nixon White House -- these were truly malfeasance on a grand scale.Used to be, a leader's peccadilloes, although always the subject of rumors and often lampooned in the opposition press, generally were considered far less important than his performance and policies in office.Bill Clinton -- saddled with the Whitewater investigation and the Paula Jones lawsuit -- may understandably pine for the good old days.
NEWS
By Dayton Duncan | December 16, 1997
NEARLY 200 years ago, in late November of 1805, the members of the Lewis and Clark expedition huddled near the mouth of the Columbia River, having become the first American citizens to cross the continent by land.Far from home and pinned down for weeks by a relentless Pacific storm that William Clark (in his own imaginative spelling) called ''tempestous and horiable,'' the small band of explorers nevertheless found a tangible way to commemorate their remarkable achievement: They began carving their names into tree trunks -- so many times, it appears from Clark's journal entries, that few trees near their sodden campsites escaped their knife blades.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1997
With a yellowed and snaggle-toothed skull in his hands, Professor James E. Starrs struts before his George Washington University law students like Hamlet at the grave of Yorick.He's discussing physical anthropology. But you almost expect him to declaim: "Alas, poor Yorick, I knew him well, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy ..."Dr. Starrs does have a lot of the theatrical about him. He's easily one of America's most famous forensic scientists, an academic sleuth investigating historical mysteries with everything from ground-searching radar to exhumation.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 4, 1997
Meriwether Lewis and William Clark may have gone where none of their brethren had gone before, but Ken Burns is in totally familiar territory tonight on PBS."Lewis & Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) details the incredible journey of Lewis and Clark, who set out in 1804 to explore land where no white man had traveled. Setting out from St. Louis, they were charged by President Thomas Jefferson with exploring the West, mapping it as much as possible, and attempting to discover the fabled Northwest Passage -- an all-water route connecting the Atlantic and Pacific.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Sheila Dresser and Michael Dresser and Sheila Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
GREAT FALLS, Mont. -- Before Capt. Meriwether Lewis saw the Great Falls of the Missouri on June 13, 1805, he heard the roar.What he beheld when he reached the tiny island at the base of the falls astonished him. Here the mighty Missouri River, some 1,500 feet wide and swollen with the snowmelt of the Rockies, fell 78 feet. It was, he wrote in his journal, a "sublimely grand specticle the grandest sight I ever beheld." It was also a crucial moment in the journey, the discovery that dispelled any fear that Lewis and William Clark had taken a wrong turn in their expedition.
NEWS
March 16, 1997
"Undaunted Courage," by Stephen Ambrose, I just finished it last night. It's beautifully done. It has a phenomenal amount of detail, so it makes the exploration of Meriwether Lewis much more memorable than, say, high school history lessons. Ambrose really brings Lewis alive.I really loved George Eliot's "Adam Bede." It's a novel of England in the 19th century. Her characterization is fantastic. By the end of the book you really feel like you know them,Also "Strange Fruit," by Lillian Smith.
NEWS
By MICHAEL E. RUANE and MICHAEL E. RUANE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1996
"Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson and the Opening of the American West," by Stephen E. Ambrose. Simon & Schuster. Illustrated. 511 pages. $27.50Late on the afternoon of Oct. 10, 1809, the renowned explorer Meriwether Lewis rode up alone to a log-cabin inn along the old Natchez Trace about 70 miles south of Nashville, Tenn.Looking agitated and sickly, he requested lodging and some whiskey and called for his bear skins and buffalo robe. Inside, he kept to himself, pacing and muttering.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2003
History buffs Larry Chrystal and Susanna Lang retraced the famed expedition of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark several years ago during a 10,000-mile drive through the western United States. Then they read a book about Lewis and Clark's three-year trek. Yesterday, Chrystal and Lang stood under a tent, headphones around their ears, gazing at illustrations of the territory Lewis and Clark explored 200 years ago during a dangerous search for a waterway to the West Coast. "When we saw the expedition was coming here, we had to come," said Lang, an ambulance driver from Severna Park, who was referring to the Corps of Discovery II, the National Park Service's traveling exhibit on Lewis and Clark.
NEWS
By Dayton Duncan | December 16, 1997
NEARLY 200 years ago, in late November of 1805, the members of the Lewis and Clark expedition huddled near the mouth of the Columbia River, having become the first American citizens to cross the continent by land.Far from home and pinned down for weeks by a relentless Pacific storm that William Clark (in his own imaginative spelling) called ''tempestous and horiable,'' the small band of explorers nevertheless found a tangible way to commemorate their remarkable achievement: They began carving their names into tree trunks -- so many times, it appears from Clark's journal entries, that few trees near their sodden campsites escaped their knife blades.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1995
During his historic cross-country journey with William Clark, the 19th-century explorer Meriwether Lewis charted territory that cartographer had ever recorded.Now the owner of a Howard County farm that she claims Lewis once owned is trying to chart new territory in local zoning law.She is asking that the 90-acre west county property be rezoned from a category that allows development to one that encourages preservation.The Nov. 10 request by owner Frances B. Devlin to change the property from "rural residential" to "rural conservation" represents the first time county zoning officials and developers can remember a property owner asking for more restrictive zoning.
NEWS
By Roger Bloom and Roger Bloom,Orange County Register | July 31, 1994
Used to be, a president had to do something pretty egregious to taint his legacy.The pervasive corruption of the Grant and Harding administrations, the wide-ranging criminality of the Nixon White House -- these were truly malfeasance on a grand scale.Used to be, a leader's peccadilloes, although always the subject of rumors and often lampooned in the opposition press, generally were considered far less important than his performance and policies in office.Bill Clinton -- saddled with the Whitewater investigation and the Paula Jones lawsuit -- may understandably pine for the good old days.
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