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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
City police said they were investigating an unusual armed robbery that took place Tuesday afternoon on the third-floor of a downtown hospital. The robbery was reported around 1:10 p.m. at Mercy Medical Center's McAuley Tower, in the 300 block of St. Paul Pl. Det. Jeremy Silbert, a police spokesman, said two hospital employees were robbed of cash from their personal belongings. The incident prompted police to set up a perimeter around the hospital. Silbert said police were reviewing surveillance camera footage and were exploring whether the robbery was tied to another that took place recently in the same area.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A popular midwife practice whose partnership with Mercy Medical Center is ending because of rising malpractice costs has found a new home at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates will move to new offices on York Road this week and begin taking patients June 23. Mercy told the midwives in October it was severing ties after two high-profile medical malpractice cases, though unrelated directly to the hospital, had driven up the cost of insurance and that it was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
At least 260 Mercy Medical Center employees will be relocated as the medical center seeks to save money by not renewing two office building leases. Mercy expects to save $1.3 million by letting the leases expire on offices at Tide Point and 225 N. Calvert St. The decision was first reported by the Baltimore Business Journal. The offices are used for administrative tasks like billing. The lease at Tide Point for 25,600 square feet will end this spring, and the lease for 30,000 square feet at North Calvert Street will end in July.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A 29-year-old man in custody on a charge of attempted robbery died in a nearby hospital after suffering a medical problem in a Baltimore courtroom Wednesday, the state corrections department confirmed. Medics took Ronnie A. Adams Jr. to Mercy Medical Center, where he died. An autopsy has been performed, according to the medical examiner's office, but investigators have not determined a cause of death. Footage captured by courtroom cameras shows Adams sitting on the courtroom's front bench shortly before 3 p.m. Wednesday, awaiting a hearing as another case played out. He appeared to be talking to a woman sitting next to him. Adams suddenly listed to his right, heaving and snorting for breath, the tape shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 4, 2001
The palm trees swayed in the mezzanine hallway at Baltimore's Waterfront Marriott. Not from the swell of tropical breezes. Probably more the swells in the tropical crowd gathered there for Mercy Medical Center's 16th annual "Mercy Magic" gala, this year given the theme "Mercy Mambo!" Some 600 festively attired folk swirled through the corridor, stopping to try their luck at casino-style games, or shaking things up with castanets and maracas. The doors to the ballroom opened, revealing a Latin band performing before a jungle of palm centerpieces on the dining tables.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2004
The Rev. Bernard J. Suppe, the longtime chaplain at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore who overcame a tragic childhood to spread joy and hope to the sick and dying, died of a stroke Saturday at the hospital. He was 82. Over the past year, Father Suppe maintained his wry humor and good spirits despite deteriorating health that included operations on his spine, a total hip replacement and the implanting of a pacemaker in his chest. Bent nearly in half and hobbling around the hospital with the aid of a walker, Father Suppe told a reporter for The Catholic Review last month: "I'm bent over now, but my back is not me. My heart, soul and mind are very erect.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | December 8, 2005
Ann C. Scott, a retired medical technologist who was devoted to the Sisters of Mercy, died of liver disease Sunday at her Parkville home. She was 75. Ann Carr Scott was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Walbrook neighborhood. She was educated by the Sisters of Mercy from first grade through her graduation in 1947 from the old St. Agnes High School in Mount Washington. "It was during the later part of her schooling that she met Sister Paula Marie Phelan, who became the most influential person in her life," said Tamia Karpeles, a daughter-in-law.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2008
The greatest risk factor for cataracts, which occur when the eye's natural lens hardens and becomes cloudy, is aging, says Dr. Sheri Rowen, director of the Eye and Cosmetic Surgery Center at Mercy Medical Center. In fact, by the time they reach the age of 80, more than 50 percent of all Americans have a cataract or have been treated for cataracts with a relatively simple surgical procedure. Millions of people a year have cataract surgery. What are cataracts? Cataracts are the clouding and hardening of the natural, God-given lens of the eye [made mostly of protein and water, the lens is the clear part of the eye that helps to focus light on the retina]
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2001
Ending a federal lawsuit that claimed Baltimore abused its power to condemn property, the owners of a downtown law office building said yesterday they've agreed to sell their property and drop their lawsuit against the city. Paul Kramer, an attorney who is co-owner of the 233 St. Paul Pl. office building, said he sent U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin notice yesterday that he will not pursue his lawsuit, which sought to block a condemnation ordinance passed May 7 by the City Council.
NEWS
July 13, 2009
Avascular necrosis is a disorder of the bone. It affects the ends of long bones, primarily the hip, but the knee and shoulder and ankle can also be affected, says Dr. Marc W. Hungerford, director of joint replacement and reconstruction at Mercy Medical Center. In avascular necrosis the circulation in the bone is interrupted and dead spots can appear. If these dead spots are close enough to the joint, then the joint can collapse and the patient can develop arthritis of the involved joint.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 12, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Sister Mary Jacinta Robson, a retired medical technologist who spent six decades at Mercy Medical Center, died there of congestive heart failure Feb. 7. She was 88. "She had been a beloved presence at the hospital for over 60 years and worked in the microbiology department for decades, and in later years was a hospital volunteer," said Sister Irene Callahan, a fellow member of Sisters of Mercy. Born Clara Jane Robson in Baltimore and raised on Ridgewood Avenue, she was the daughter of Alonzo Robson, a clerk, and Goldie Updegraff Robson, a homemaker.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
Sister Lois Mueller, a Sister of Mercy whose career as a teacher and administrator took her to parochial schools in Baltimore, Washington and Georgia, died Wednesday of pneumonia at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 98. "I have known Sister Lois since the 1960s, when she was my superior at St. Bernardine's on Gorsuch Avenue, and she was always a very great lady," said Sister Faith McKean of the Sisters of Mercy. "She was very gentle - but could be determined - but very gentle.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Mercy Medical Center is parting ways with a midwife group that has worked out of the hospital for years because of rising malpractice insurance costs. The decision to close Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates, which plans to stop delivering babies in February, leaves women with fewer birthing choices outside of the traditional doctor. But Mercy said high-profile medical malpractice cases in recent months have driven up the cost of insurance, and the hospital was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | October 9, 2013
One of the busiest hospitals in the state that tends to victims of sexual assault has launched an smartphone app that offers instant access to resources such as medical and police assistance and a crisis hotline. The free app, called bMOREsafe is a project of the 30 forensic nurse examiners at Mercy Medical Center, a designated sexual assault and domestic violence center in Baltimore City. The examiners are available at all times to the victims 13 and older at the hospital, and they work with criminal justice officers and other agencies.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Heubeck, For The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
When James Russell learned that he had a rare form of appendix cancer, he thoroughly investigated his treatment options. His research led him to Dr. Armando Sardi, a surgical oncologist at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore who is one of a few specialists worldwide who performs an aggressive, cutting-edge procedure on patients afflicted with advanced stage abdominal cancer. New York resident Russell, a husband and father of two, proved to be a strong candidate for the potentially life-extending procedure.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Carmel Quinn, a homemaker and volunteer, died of a heart attack Sunday at University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 83. Born Mary Katherine Carmel Fay in Belturbet, in County Cavan, Ireland, she moved to Baltimore in 1952 after her marriage to Dr. Michael Kevin Quinn, a physician and general practitioner who was also born in her hometown. She worked as a receptionist briefly at Mercy Medical Center after moving to Baltimore. Mrs. Quinn lived in the Hampton section of Towson for many years and played tennis with friends and neighbors.
NEWS
October 5, 2009
A reader of our Picture of Health blog asked recently how to distinguish the symptoms of heartburn from the symptoms of a heart attack. It turns out to be harder than you might think. Dr. Richard A. Desi, a gastroenterologist at the Institute for Digestive Health and Liver Disease at Baltimore's Mercy Medical Center, discussed how to tell the difference. "That's actually not a very easy question," Desi said. "It's a difficult question for patients and for doctors." One key, he said, is to look for what are considered the classic symptoms of each.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | October 6, 2007
Over the last few months, Mark Loizeaux has often parked in the Mercy Medical Center garage, among the many visitors on their way to see ailing relatives or new mothers. But Loizeaux wasn't there to make social calls. He was in the garage to figure out how to blow it up. Loizeaux is a licensed "blaster," a professional who packs explosives into buildings and then makes the buildings disappear. If demolition is an art, as Loizeaux says it is, then implosion is its most dramatic form. He has brought down, in seconds, the Seattle Kingdome, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma and numerous fading hotels on the Las Vegas Strip.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Dr. Franz Xavier Groll, a retired physician who lived and practiced on Eager Street in downtown Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood, died of pulmonary thrombosis April 2 at Keswick Multi-Care Center. He was 95. Born in Aalen in Germany, he was the son of a forest manager who was also a gamekeeper. He grew up at the time of Adolf Hitler's rise and was a member of the German Youth Movement. He studied medicine at the Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg and served in the German army as a combat physician attached to a Panzer division.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
City police said they were investigating an unusual armed robbery that took place Tuesday afternoon on the third-floor of a downtown hospital. The robbery was reported around 1:10 p.m. at Mercy Medical Center's McAuley Tower, in the 300 block of St. Paul Pl. Det. Jeremy Silbert, a police spokesman, said two hospital employees were robbed of cash from their personal belongings. The incident prompted police to set up a perimeter around the hospital. Silbert said police were reviewing surveillance camera footage and were exploring whether the robbery was tied to another that took place recently in the same area.
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