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NEWS
February 25, 2011
The article "Mercury Ban Puts Freezer on Thermometers" (Feb. 23) includes a listing of other devices containing the substance. But there's a significant omission — the newer lightbulbs coming in as incandescent ones are phased out. The whole situation is absurd. Officials crack down on older thermometers, yet have no problem with forcing CFL bulbs on people, even though they pose a danger if they break or are not discarded of properly. What's more, these mercury retainers are hardly "light bulbs" since they offer virtually no illumination.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
NASA's Messenger spacecraft has swung around its namesake planet for three years, beaming observations of Mercury back to Earth, but next March it will smash into the cratered surface it has been studying from afar. The satellite's oblong orbit around the solar system's innermost planet brings it gradually closer and closer as it looks into Mercury's mysterious volcanoes, craters and magnetic field. With dwindling fuel to counteract the dense planet's pull, the scientists managing the mission at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel can only delay its fall for so long.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
Six months after NASA's Messenger spacecraft began orbiting the planet nearest the sun, scientists have spotted a vast lava field at Mercury's north pole, weird sinkholes around some craters, and reason enough to throw out most theories for how the planet formed. "In-orbit is definitely the place to be," said James Head III, a Brown University geologist on the team. Messenger cameras looking down from a polar orbi have revealed surface details that could not be seen during three previous flybys, or by the Mariner 10 mission in 1974-1975.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Within months after leaving Maryland as a junior in the spring of 2005, John Gilchrist realized he had made a mistake. Sitting in his apartment in Rishon LeZion, a coastal town in Israel where he had begun what would become a nomadic professional basketball career, Gilchrist wrote an email apologizing to his former coach, Gary Williams, and to former Terps assistant Dave Dickerson, by then the head coach at Tulane. "I just basically poured my guts out to them," Gilchrist recalled on a trip back to College Park last month.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Scientists, including members of two Maryland-based teams, believe they have found ice inside craters near Mercury's poles, a discovery they say could reveal more about the "building blocks" for life on other planets. Though the small planet is closest to the sun, Mercury rotates nearly upright, meaning some areas on its poles never see sunlight. Using evidence of reflectivity, surface temperatures and the presence of excess hydrogen gathered by NASA's Messenger spacecraft, the scientists have concluded that there are deposits of ice and other organic material accumulated in dark areas of Mercury's surface.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Venus, Jupiter and Mercury are all visible in the night sky around the end of this month, and they are moving toward their closest conjunction for nearly a decade. The three planets fit within a 5-degree sliver of the sky starting Friday and through Wednesday. They won't be bunched as closely together as they will on Sunday night until 2021, according to EarthSky.org. Look to the north-northwest horizon about 40 minutes after sunset, EarthSky suggests. Around this time of year, that means a little after 9 p.m. in Baltimore, with sunset getting close to 8:30 p.m. Wondering which planet is which when you look?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene issued a warning Tuesday about skin creams that may contain mercury.  One of those creams, Crema Aguamary, has been linked to one case of mercury poisoning in the state. It was purchased in Mexico and used by somebody in Maryland. Mercury in skin creams can cause memory problems and problems with the nervous system, kidneys, skin, blood pressure, and digestive tract, according to state health officials. Unborn babies, infants and children are especially sensitive to the effects of mercury.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration prohibits the sale of skin-bleaching products containing mercury in the United States.  Products that contain the ingredients mercury, mercurio, mercuric, mercurous, or calomel should not be used, DHMH cautioned.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Only three months after NASA's Messenger spacecraft became the first to orbit the planet Mercury, scientists are already tossing out some long-held ideas about the place, and wondering at some surprising and unexpected discoveries. "In many cases, a lot of our original ideas about Mercury were just plain wrong," said Larry Nittler, a Messenger scientist from the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Among the surprises from the Maryland-run mission: • Mercury has unexpectedly high abundances of potassium and thorium — elements that scientists thought would have evaporated as the planet formed so close to the young sun. Now they'll need a new theory of how (and where)
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 22, 2012
People aren't the only ones at risk from eating mercury-contaminated fish, since coal-burning power plants have liberally sprinkled the toxic metal across the earth's waters.  But it appears that captive dolphins have a little less to worry about in that regard than their wild counterparts. A new study by researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the National Aquarium in Baltimore found that the aquarium's captive bottlenose dolphins have lower levels of mercury in their bodies than wild dolphins tested off the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of Florida.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
NASA's Messenger spacecraft has swung around its namesake planet for three years, beaming observations of Mercury back to Earth, but next March it will smash into the cratered surface it has been studying from afar. The satellite's oblong orbit around the solar system's innermost planet brings it gradually closer and closer as it looks into Mercury's mysterious volcanoes, craters and magnetic field. With dwindling fuel to counteract the dense planet's pull, the scientists managing the mission at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel can only delay its fall for so long.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Bob Bowman gets to the question before it can even be raised. "You guys want to know if Michael's coming back," he says to a pair of visitors. Michael is Michael Phelps , the greatest swimmer of all time and Bowman's pupil from gawky adolescence. Twitter has buzzed in recent weeks with rumors of Phelps abandoning his planned retirement. "I'd be the first to know," Bowman says. "And I haven't heard a thing from him. So the imminent comeback is not so imminent. " Furthermore, he would not want Phelps to resume swimming unless the great Olympian was absolutely committed, more committed than he was leading up to the 2012 London Games.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Venus, Jupiter and Mercury are all visible in the night sky around the end of this month, and they are moving toward their closest conjunction for nearly a decade. The three planets fit within a 5-degree sliver of the sky starting Friday and through Wednesday. They won't be bunched as closely together as they will on Sunday night until 2021, according to EarthSky.org. Look to the north-northwest horizon about 40 minutes after sunset, EarthSky suggests. Around this time of year, that means a little after 9 p.m. in Baltimore, with sunset getting close to 8:30 p.m. Wondering which planet is which when you look?
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
There is no Transit of Venus to be watched in 2013, or any major eclipses visible for long from Maryland, but local sky watchers say there is still plenty to look forward to seeing in the night sky. There could be a few opportunities to see rare objects like comets and asteroids, as well as good chances to see some of our closest neighbors in the solar system. One of those is Mercury, one of the most elusive of Earth's neighbors because it orbits so closely to the sun, making it rare to see on the nighttime horizon.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Scientists, including members of two Maryland-based teams, believe they have found ice inside craters near Mercury's poles, a discovery they say could reveal more about the "building blocks" for life on other planets. Though the small planet is closest to the sun, Mercury rotates nearly upright, meaning some areas on its poles never see sunlight. Using evidence of reflectivity, surface temperatures and the presence of excess hydrogen gathered by NASA's Messenger spacecraft, the scientists have concluded that there are deposits of ice and other organic material accumulated in dark areas of Mercury's surface.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Another day, another twist in the Ed Reed saga. On Wednesday, the Ravens safety told Comcast SportsNet that he "always planned on playing this year. " That obviously sounds like a positive development, but be warned that the Reed roller coaster hasn't yet come to a halt and won't until he reports to training camp next Wednesday. So keep your seatbelts fastened and fingers crossed that Reed's mindset won't swerve before camp begins. After all, Reed's comments have been pretty inconsistent all offseason.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 2, 2012
Olympics Stettinius to be honored at Capitol before Olympics Suzanne Stettinius of Parkton, a top-ranked U.S. pentathlete, will be sent off to the London Games as part of the "Capitol Fourth" celebration on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. The ceremony will air nationally on PBS from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Stettinius is part of a contingent of American athletes who will be honored before departing for the Olympics. The segment featuring Stettinius will be hosted by eight-time Olympic medal-winning speedskater Apolo Anton Ohno . WNBA Mystics beat Mercury, end five-game losing streak The Washington Mystics held off the Phoenix Mercury, 90-77, on Sunday to end a five-game losing streak and win for the first time since June 15. The win came with a price, however.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | November 4, 1990
Q: Where can we find information on antique barometers? Also, where can we find a source or craftsman who can restore such a piece?A: Charles and Jill Probst deal in fine antique mercury barometers and properly restore and ship such pieces. Write them at Charles Edwin Inc., Fine Antique Clocks & Barometers, Box 1340, Louisa, Va. 23093; phone (703) 967-0416. The Probsts offer a fine selection of antique mercury barometers.Antique mercury barometers usually measure from 3 1/2 feet to 4 feet tall, and those made after 1850 are, for the most part, not signed with a maker's name.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 9, 2004
ATLANTA - Mercury in dental fillings has not been proved to cause kidney, brain or immune system damage, as critics charge, says a report funded by the National Institutes of Health. But the report is being released today under controversy. The NIH is investigating whether its dentistry institute improperly awarded the research contract, allegedly to uphold the American Dental Association's stance that mercury fillings are safe. The Life Sciences Research Office, a Washington-based nonprofit group, conducted the research on behalf of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 21, 2012
Et cetera Prahalis helps Mercury edge Mystics Samantha Prahalis hit a jumper with 23.2 seconds to play to help the host Phoenix Mercury to an 80-77 win over the Washington Mystics. Prahalis had 15 points and seven rebounds, DeWanna Bonner added 19 points and seven boards while Krystal Thomas donated 15 and six for the Mercury, which ended a three-game losing streak. Michelle Snow posted 21 points and nine rebounds while Monique Currie had 20 points and six boards for the Mystics, who have lost their past two games.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | June 21, 2012
Earlier this year, Venus and Jupiter adorned the western sky alongside the waxing crescent moon. Now, Mercury and Mars can be spotted alongside it. The closest planet to the sun will appear as a bright star in the sky this month. Mercury will rise above the horizon to the right of the moon around dusk Thursday and Friday nights. Further to the right will be the bright stars Pollux and Castor, according to EarthSky.org. Then, the moon will pass by Mars, too, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday.
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