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Merchant Marine

NEWS
July 15, 1996
Jean Gatow Haviland, 84, merchant marine enthusiastJean Gatow Haviland, who took an avid interest in the `D merchant marine and received calls from around the world, died at home on West University Parkway on Friday of liver failure at 84, after developing breast cancer.Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., she attended school in New York City and worked during the 1930s for National Carloading Corp., primarily a railroad freight-shipping company, said her brother, Albert F. Gatow Jr. of Waltham, Vt.In 1950, she married Dr. E. Kenneth Haviland, an associate professor of mathematics at the Johns Hopkins University, who died after an automobile accident in 1989.
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NEWS
March 24, 2000
G. Edward Kerr Jr., 75, Hollins Market merchant G. Edward Kerr Jr., who sold beef at a stall in Hollins Market in Southwest Baltimore, died Sunday at Peninsula Regional Hospital in Salisbury after a fall. He was 75 and had lived in Ocean City for six years. The Catonsville resident retired to Kent Island in 1973. Beginning in the 1930s, he worked for the family meat-cutting business -- G. Edward Kerr & Sons -- at the market at Hollins Street and Carrollton Avenue. In 1963, he sold the stall and became an agent for Monumental Life Insurance Co. Born in Baltimore, he attended St. Joseph's Passionist Monastery School in Irvington and Calvert Hall College.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Sometimes recognition for a job well done is a long time coming. Seventy years ago, Pasadena resident William Tiernan was an 18-year-old sailor in the British Merchant Navy, participating in one of World War II's most dangerous assignments, the Russian Arctic convoy. A couple of weeks ago, the 87-year-old Tiernan received special recognition for that duty with an Arctic Star Medal - an award only recently issued by the British government. "My opinion is that the merchant marine is not recognized like the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines are. That's why we didn't get no medals" until now, the British-born Tiernan said without any bitterness Still, he noted, "To this day, merchant marines cannot join the VFW. " The Russian Arctic convoy, in which Allied troops supplied the Soviet Union in its struggle against invading German forces, has often been referred to as a suicide mission.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | June 10, 1991
For most veterans of World War II, the war that began on Dec. 7, 1941 ended on Dec. 31, 1946. President Harry Truman fixed that cutoff date for veterans' benefits, and that, as they say, was that.But in the process of disbanding the armed forces in the immediate post-war period, the government fell into an act of indefensible unfairness: members of the Merchant Marine were denied veterans' status. More than 40 years elapsed before that was corrected. After a prolonged court battle against the Department of Defense, the mariners in January 1988 won the same general rights others had enjoyed all along.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
Chester J. Vikell decided early in life that working in his father's grocery store in Fells Point was not for him. As a teen-ager, he left school and ran away to sea.For the next 40 years, he worked in the merchant marine and as a mate aboard tugboats in the Baltimore harbor, retiring in 1984.Mr. Vikell died of cancer Saturday at Mercy Medical Center. He was 70 and lived in Carney."He always wanted to work on the water," said a daughter, Sharon Nelson of Carney, with whom he had lived since 1991.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2010
Thomas S. Mallonee Jr., a retired advertising copywriter and restaurant reviewer who had also taught wine appreciation classes, died July 20 of cancer at Tate Chesapeake Hospice House in Linthicum. He was 82. Mr. Mallonee was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville. He was a graduate of Pikesville High School and earned a bachelor's degree in advertising in 1949 from the University of Maryland, College Park. In the 1950s, he served in the Coast Guard and the merchant marine.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2001
A senior member of Congress says that a shortage of cargo ships and civilian sailors could imperil the war on terrorism if large numbers of American tanks and troops are needed overseas. U.S. Rep. James L. Oberstar, a Minnesota Democrat, has submitted legislation to Congress calling for tax cuts and regulatory changes to salvage the United States' withering merchant marine. Typically given little regard in peacetime, the merchant marine is the nation's primary means of moving military supplies during a war. "If this conflict goes on into the new year, we're going to need supply lines that will severely test our ability to provide sealift," said Oberstar, the senior Democrat on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2011
Joseph Gordon Donald Jones, a retired Baltimore County police officer who served in the U.S. merchant marine and the Navy during World War II, died April 3 of a kidney infection at Franklin Square Medical Center. The longtime Essex resident was 84. The son of a plumber and a housekeeper, Mr. Jones, who was known as Gordon, was born the fourth of five children in Baltimore, and raised in Essex and the city. He dropped out of city public schools after his father's death in 1941 to help support his family.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | September 20, 2007
Thomas Osman Jr., an American merchant marine engineer whose career on the high seas spanned more 30 years and three wars, died Sept. 13 of lung cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Baldwin resident was 84. Mr. Osman was born and raised in Quakertown, Pa., and after graduating from high school in 1940, went to work for Bethlehem Steel Corp. in Bethlehem, Pa. In 1942, Mr. Osman enrolled at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, N.Y., and the next year he was a cadet aboard the Liberty ship Ward Hunt.
NEWS
By JONATHAN YATES | March 12, 1991
In Operation Desert Storm, U.S. military forces proved their effectiveness on the battlefield. Making it to the battlefield, however, could be a major problem in the next campaign. Although the United States had the military might and methods to act forcefully abroad, it may not have the means to do so again: Increasing foreign ownership in the U.S. airline and shipping industries could prevent extensive action in the future.Over 95 percent of the supplies for U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf arrived by ship.
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