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NEWS
By Paul H. Johnson and Paul H. Johnson,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 17, 2000
HACKENSACK, N.J. -- Artemio Hernandez spends his days by the water. Every afternoon, the wiry and energetic 87-year-old Cuban takes the subway to Battery Park from his Upper West Side home to watch the ships pass by and to admire the Statue of Liberty. "I go there to remember my younger days," said Hernandez, who likes to remember the days when he lived in the South Ferry section of Manhattan 60 years ago, after he first came to the United States as a stowaway, huddled in the hold of a passenger ship.
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BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1999
An $800 million business deal cut the heart out of the American merchant marine yesterday, as a foreign shipping conglomerate carved up the last global ocean carrier based in the United States.It was a paper transaction only. No American merchant seamen lost their jobs, and no U.S.-flagged ships were handed over to foreign crews.But the sale of Sea-Land Service Inc.'s international shipping division to the Danish A. P. Moller Group was the latest, and perhaps strongest, blow to a merchant fleet that once circled the globe and dominated international commerce.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | June 10, 1991
For most veterans of World War II, the war that began on Dec. 7, 1941 ended on Dec. 31, 1946. President Harry Truman fixed that cutoff date for veterans' benefits, and that, as they say, was that.But in the process of disbanding the armed forces in the immediate post-war period, the government fell into an act of indefensible unfairness: members of the Merchant Marine were denied veterans' status. More than 40 years elapsed before that was corrected. After a prolonged court battle against the Department of Defense, the mariners in January 1988 won the same general rights others had enjoyed all along.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 29, 1991
Air so cold it numbed their faces and froze every breath. Ice so thick it took pickaxes and 10-pound mauls to open doors. Ships rolling in single file following the narrow channel cut by an icebreaker, sitting ducks for Nazi U-boat torpedoes and strafing airplanes."
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
Chester J. Vikell decided early in life that working in his father's grocery store in Fells Point was not for him. As a teen-ager, he left school and ran away to sea.For the next 40 years, he worked in the merchant marine and as a mate aboard tugboats in the Baltimore harbor, retiring in 1984.Mr. Vikell died of cancer Saturday at Mercy Medical Center. He was 70 and lived in Carney."He always wanted to work on the water," said a daughter, Sharon Nelson of Carney, with whom he had lived since 1991.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2001
A senior member of Congress says that a shortage of cargo ships and civilian sailors could imperil the war on terrorism if large numbers of American tanks and troops are needed overseas. U.S. Rep. James L. Oberstar, a Minnesota Democrat, has submitted legislation to Congress calling for tax cuts and regulatory changes to salvage the United States' withering merchant marine. Typically given little regard in peacetime, the merchant marine is the nation's primary means of moving military supplies during a war. "If this conflict goes on into the new year, we're going to need supply lines that will severely test our ability to provide sealift," said Oberstar, the senior Democrat on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 12, 2011
Joseph Gordon Donald Jones, a retired Baltimore County police officer who served in the U.S. merchant marine and the Navy during World War II, died April 3 of a kidney infection at Franklin Square Medical Center. The longtime Essex resident was 84. The son of a plumber and a housekeeper, Mr. Jones, who was known as Gordon, was born the fourth of five children in Baltimore, and raised in Essex and the city. He dropped out of city public schools after his father's death in 1941 to help support his family.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2010
Thomas S. Mallonee Jr., a retired advertising copywriter and restaurant reviewer who had also taught wine appreciation classes, died July 20 of cancer at Tate Chesapeake Hospice House in Linthicum. He was 82. Mr. Mallonee was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville. He was a graduate of Pikesville High School and earned a bachelor's degree in advertising in 1949 from the University of Maryland, College Park. In the 1950s, he served in the Coast Guard and the merchant marine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | September 20, 2007
Thomas Osman Jr., an American merchant marine engineer whose career on the high seas spanned more 30 years and three wars, died Sept. 13 of lung cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Baldwin resident was 84. Mr. Osman was born and raised in Quakertown, Pa., and after graduating from high school in 1940, went to work for Bethlehem Steel Corp. in Bethlehem, Pa. In 1942, Mr. Osman enrolled at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, N.Y., and the next year he was a cadet aboard the Liberty ship Ward Hunt.
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