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By Dan Rodricks | December 4, 1991
At long last, we come to Act III of the fifth opera in the Don Donaldo Ring Cycle, inspired by the legends of the Lord High Governor of Maryland. In Acts I and II, Don Donaldo worked futilely to save his empire. Yet, goaded into rages by angry mail from peasants, spurned by a Parliament he alienated, Don Donaldo became increasingly morose and isolated from his once-adoring public. He has become painfully aware that, without drastic action, his empire will totter further.Don Donaldo, On The Edge Place: A smoldering stump dump Time: The presentAs the curtain rises, we see the darkest setting in all the Don Donaldo operas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
The last time Charles Gounod's "Faust" was staged at the Lyric Opera House , 11 years ago, the work's original medieval-period setting was changed to World War I. That production, devised for the late John Lehmeyer for the old Baltimore Opera Company, found the soul-selling title character and that of the accommodating Mephistopheles decked out as German fighter pilots. Silent films were projected in key scenes. This week, "Faust" returns to the same venue, the inaugural-season closing presentation by Lyric Opera Baltimore.
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FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | November 7, 1994
The Washington Opera opened its 1994-95 season Saturday night at the Kennedy Center Opera House with a generally very pleasurable production of Gounod's "Faust."This opera is full of justifiably popular and familiar arias and choruses. This production may not be on the level of the finest French productions, but it is well worth experiencing on its own merits.The main reason to see this particular production is the diabolically sinister portrayal of Mephistopheles by Jeffrey Wells. He is imposing both vocally and physically.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH | June 9, 2009
If three's a trend, we've got a new one around here - performing Gounod's iconic opera Faust. Between this weekend and November, the Baltimore/Washington area will witness no less than three presentations of the work. What are the odds of that? Faust, which contains some of the most popular arias in the repertoire, tells the Goethe-based tale of the scholar who sells his soul to Mephistopheles in exchange for eternal youth and a beautiful woman. First up is what is billed as a "fully staged shortened version" by Opera Camerata of Washington, with chorus and orchestra, at La Maison Francaise, a.k.a.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH | June 9, 2009
If three's a trend, we've got a new one around here - performing Gounod's iconic opera Faust. Between this weekend and November, the Baltimore/Washington area will witness no less than three presentations of the work. What are the odds of that? Faust, which contains some of the most popular arias in the repertoire, tells the Goethe-based tale of the scholar who sells his soul to Mephistopheles in exchange for eternal youth and a beautiful woman. First up is what is billed as a "fully staged shortened version" by Opera Camerata of Washington, with chorus and orchestra, at La Maison Francaise, a.k.a.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
The last time Charles Gounod's "Faust" was staged at the Lyric Opera House , 11 years ago, the work's original medieval-period setting was changed to World War I. That production, devised for the late John Lehmeyer for the old Baltimore Opera Company, found the soul-selling title character and that of the accommodating Mephistopheles decked out as German fighter pilots. Silent films were projected in key scenes. This week, "Faust" returns to the same venue, the inaugural-season closing presentation by Lyric Opera Baltimore.
NEWS
By WILLIAM McCLOSKEY | March 16, 1994
The Baltimore Opera, while providing the unique opportunity to hear the first essay into several new roles by a hometown boy who is also one of the world's major basses -- James Morris -- has also given us the pleasure of hearing two of the leading basses of the previous generation in roles to which they can still bring great authority.Four seasons ago Georgio Tozzi, who made his Metropolitan Opera debut in 1955, performed the scurrilous music master Don Basilio in ''Barber of Seville'' with the same spooky humor that delighted Met audiences throughout the 1960s and 1970s.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 9, 1994
If you can survive the outrage, "The Boys of St. Vincent," showing for the next five nights at 7 at the Baltimore Museum of Art under the auspices of the Baltimore Film Forum's First Look series, is an absolute must-see.Originally developed as a mini-series for the Canadian Broadcasting Corp., the three-hour film excited the passions that most provocative, excellent and truthful works excite, and was promptly banned. Many lawsuits later, it was shown, to well-deserved national acclaim. In the meantime, it has been released in the United States a city at a time as a three-hour feature, to wondrous (and well-deserved)
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 18, 1991
LAUREL -- A strong argument can be made that horses in New York are better than Maryland horses. Purses are higher, and reputations are certainly loftier. But when the New Yorkers ship south for rich races, they sometimes find themselves getting an equine version of the Maryland Shuffle.It happened in both stakes events this weekend at Laurel Race Course. Yesterday, Sticks and Bricks drew off to an easy win in the Devil's Bag Stakes, while the 13-10 favorite -- the New York invader, Delray David -- ran a dismal last throughout the seven-furlong race.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 12, 1995
Connoisseurs of the surreal, the grotesque and the absurd are hereby urged to repair to the Orpheum in Fells Point for a tangy repast of unimaginable delight. Others are advised to steer clear; this dish is for the cognoscenti.The movie is "Faust," by the Czech surrealist animator Jan Svankmajer, as much out of Kafka as out of Goethe and Marlowe. It reiterates the classic story of the necromancer who makes a deal with His Satanic Majesty in order to enjoy sublime power and sensation on Earth but who must, in the end, give the devil his due.However, this "Faust" is a mad mixture of mediums, yielding images largely unseen anywhere outside the most recondite animation emporiums.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 9, 1994
If you can survive the outrage, "The Boys of St. Vincent," showing for the next five nights at 7 at the Baltimore Museum of Art under the auspices of the Baltimore Film Forum's First Look series, is an absolute must-see.Originally developed as a mini-series for the Canadian Broadcasting Corp., the three-hour film excited the passions that most provocative, excellent and truthful works excite, and was promptly banned. Many lawsuits later, it was shown, to well-deserved national acclaim. In the meantime, it has been released in the United States a city at a time as a three-hour feature, to wondrous (and well-deserved)
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | November 7, 1994
The Washington Opera opened its 1994-95 season Saturday night at the Kennedy Center Opera House with a generally very pleasurable production of Gounod's "Faust."This opera is full of justifiably popular and familiar arias and choruses. This production may not be on the level of the finest French productions, but it is well worth experiencing on its own merits.The main reason to see this particular production is the diabolically sinister portrayal of Mephistopheles by Jeffrey Wells. He is imposing both vocally and physically.
NEWS
By WILLIAM McCLOSKEY | March 16, 1994
The Baltimore Opera, while providing the unique opportunity to hear the first essay into several new roles by a hometown boy who is also one of the world's major basses -- James Morris -- has also given us the pleasure of hearing two of the leading basses of the previous generation in roles to which they can still bring great authority.Four seasons ago Georgio Tozzi, who made his Metropolitan Opera debut in 1955, performed the scurrilous music master Don Basilio in ''Barber of Seville'' with the same spooky humor that delighted Met audiences throughout the 1960s and 1970s.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 4, 1991
At long last, we come to Act III of the fifth opera in the Don Donaldo Ring Cycle, inspired by the legends of the Lord High Governor of Maryland. In Acts I and II, Don Donaldo worked futilely to save his empire. Yet, goaded into rages by angry mail from peasants, spurned by a Parliament he alienated, Don Donaldo became increasingly morose and isolated from his once-adoring public. He has become painfully aware that, without drastic action, his empire will totter further.Don Donaldo, On The Edge Place: A smoldering stump dump Time: The presentAs the curtain rises, we see the darkest setting in all the Don Donaldo operas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 9, 1990
David Zinman conducts an enormous repertory -- most of it persuasively and some of it superbly. The music of Berlioz ranks high in the second of thosecategories, and last night in Meyerhoff Hall the music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra led a terrific performance of that composer's "The Damnation of Faust.What makes Zinman a splendid Berliozian is a conducting technique that enables his musicians to play a treacherous piece like the "Minuet of the Will o' the Wisps" with a combination of airiness and sauciness that derives in part from their confidence that their leader can keep them together.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 17, 2001
A world that sees too many human demons may not find much to fear in the Mephistopheles conjured up by Gounod's romantic opera, "Faust." The Baltimore Opera Company's provocative, vibrantly sung, ultimately frustrating new production makes a considered effort to underline the wickedness of this baritonal Beelzebub. There's no shortage of fire and brimstone. By the last scene, not just the stage but the whole interior of the Lyric Opera House is bathed in flames (some real, most simulated)
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