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Mentoring

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By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
The Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation announced Monday the launch of three mentoring, tutoring and job-training programs that aim to help children from some of Baltimore's most troubled neighborhoods. Half a million dollars over the next two years will go toward one program that will pair mentors with Barclay elementary school students and two programs in Druid Heights that will work to lower dropout rates among high school students and help those who have already dropped out get diplomas, receive training and find employment.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Orioles manager Buck Showalter fidgeted in his chair, admitting he was uncomfortable about the possibility of tying his mentor, Billy Martin, on the all-time managerial wins list. Monday night's 5-2 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays was the 1,253rd of Showalter's career, tying Martin for 36th place in baseball history. Showalter said he didn't know he was drawing close to Martin, who managed the New York Yankees when Showalter was an up-and-coming minor league manager in the Yankees system, until his daughter, Allie, informed him recently.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2012
One of the added benefits of Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts being with the team while he continues to recover from multiple concussions is his ability to impart wisdom onto his younger teammates. Roberts has begun to take outfielder Adam Jones and infielder Robert Andino under his wing in teaching them his mentality of stealing bases. "They both seem very interested in that aspect and it's something I feel like I have quite a bit of experience at," said Roberts, who is second on the Orioles' career stolen-base list with 274 and had four seasons of 30-or-more steals.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
The first time Keenan Reynolds saw a Navy football game, the Midshipmen were three-touchdown underdogs to sixth-ranked Ohio State in the 2009 season opener. Reynolds was a sophomore at Goodpasture Christian School outside Nashville, Tenn., and was barely on anyone's recruiting radar. As he watched the game on television, Reynolds started paying attention to Navy quarterback Ricky Dobbs. Dobbs, then a junior who had just taken over as the starter, nearly led the Midshipmen to an upset win in Columbus.
NEWS
December 18, 1990
Business and labor leaders in Maryland are being urged to allow their employees to volunteer for the U.S. Department of Labor workforce quality program.The program matches volunteer role models, or mentors, with disadvantaged or at-risk youths. The goal is to motivate the youths to stay in school and acquire basic skills needed to survive in a competitive workplace.In the Baltimore area, information on youth mentoring programs is available fom Kalman Hettleman of the Baltimore Mentoring Institute, at 301-685-8316.
FEATURES
By JEAN MARBELLA | October 15, 1990
Initially a business concept, then a feminist one, now it's an educational one.Mentoring -- in which someone who has made it helps along someone who hasn't -- suddenly has become hot among educators and others trying to solve high drop-out rates among inner city youth.Mentoring pairs successful members of the community with schoolchildren deemed "at risk" for failing school or falling prey to the crime, drugs or teen pregnancies that pock their neighborhoods.The idea has drawn much enthusiasm, and most major cities have some sort of mentoring program.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1994
Dr. Margaret Jensvold hoped to break ground in science -- not law -- when she accepted a prestigious fellowship at the National Institute of Mental Health in 1987.The Johns Hopkins medical school graduate had been named one of the six "most promising" psychiatric residents in the United States. She envisioned a future in research and writing, perhaps chairing a department at a medical school one day.Instead, Dr. Jensvold has all but abandoned that dream to turn a national spotlight on a scientific fraternity she says squeezed her out of its ranks.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1994
To hear her attorneys and other supporters tell it, Dr. Margaret Jensvold had a great triumph and possibly even put a crack in the glass ceiling, that metaphorical barrier said to impede the careers of women and minorities in America.But it is evident her victory in federal court early last month was costly to her. And it was won not without possible damage to the age-old, informal method of teaching known as mentoring."I really think my career as an academic researcher is over," said Dr. Jensvold, who graduated in 1984 from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2000
IN ALL the fuss about Atholton High School's homecoming, it's nice to remember that a school is also a place for learning. And what better way to learn than by experience? Atholton has a mentoring program in which students can receive credit for time they spend working in a chosen field. The students spend from five to 10 hours a week in the program. It's a good opportunity to explore possible careers. A number of students are considering teaching. Junior Sarah Blackwell is mentoring children at Cedar Lane School in Columbia.
NEWS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Staff Writer | July 2, 1992
Wardell Scott, 17, says he was a good student at Patterson High School, but he lost focus and was pressured into fights by rival teen factions.About two years ago, Wardell was kicked out of Patterson in his ninth-grade year because of disciplinary problems. And that, he says, was enough reason to leave school for good and help his father with masonry work. That is, until he was inspired to persevere.Wardell and other young American Indians in the Baltimore area are finding guidance in the Native American Mentoring Program, a big-brother, big-sister arrangement between adults from a variety of backgrounds and Indian children.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
As principal of a small Southeast Baltimore school, Anthony Ruby has guided an array of first-year teachers, from the stars who seem to have an innate sense of how to handle a class to those who were so ineffective he declined to renew their contracts. When teachers aren't effective, he said, "it is not fair to our kids," many of whom are low-income and immigrant. Hundreds of teachers are hired each year to fill vacancies in Baltimore, and the majority will be newcomers to the profession.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Sometimes, they offer help solving math problems, or writing sentences, or forming short paragraphs. Yet often, the adults of A-OK Mentoring-Tutoring of Columbia help Howard County students unlock their potential simply by giving an hour a week of attention. "The focus of our intervention is building a strong, encouraging relationship, where the child feels valued and important. That's the first big step," said Chaya Kaplan, executive director of the volunteer nonprofit, which partners with the school system to enhance students' academic and social development.
BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2014
Bob Fireovid, a national program leader at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Beltsville, has been planning to retire in late September. But now that the Office of Personnel Management has finally released its long-awaited guidelines on phased retirement, the 63-year-old Greenbelt man might reconsider. Beginning in November, retirement-eligible federal employees may cut their hours to part time and begin drawing a portion of their pensions while sticking around to mentor their younger colleagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Derrick "OOH" Jones, aka Yo Slick and member of the influential Baltimore rap group Brown F.I.S.H., died Sunday. He was 38. Al Shipley's obituary in City Paper , which first reported Jones' death (cause of death has not yet been released), is essential reading to understand Jones' impact on Baltimore. Jones was an excellent rapper and live performer, but his reach extended well beyond hip-hop fans. He was a teacher at Gilmor Elementary and the director of the Baltimore Youth Advocate Program.
NEWS
By Stephanie Beran | April 13, 2014
Women helping other women at work - fact or fiction? When it comes to mentoring, there are those who claim women do less of it than men - on purpose. That women view other women strictly as competitors. That we are more likely to undermine female colleagues than support them. Fortunately I've rarely experienced this. Not only have I had female mentors, I find mentoring future leaders (of both genders) fun and rewarding. I also do not view other women innately as competitors. (For what, to be the only woman in the room?
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Delaware's Bob Shillinglaw recently became the first coach in men's college lacrosse to coach 600 career games. The Severna Park native and graduate may not have envisioned such longevity, but he always knew he would be a coach. “I was very, very fortunate,” he said on Wednesday morning. “Very early through high school and college, I made the decision that I wanted to be a coach. Going through my collegiate career, I decided that I really wanted to get into it, the college aspect of it. Right out of North Carolina, I was able to get in as a one-year assistant [at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy]
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | October 12, 2004
WHEN THE BOYS at William Paca Elementary gather for their biweekly, after-school mentoring session, they probably think they are hearing their assistant principal, David Lewis, and in the strictest sense, they are. But in the metaphorical sense, those kids are hearing the words of former Dunbar coaches Bob Wade and Pete Pompey, channeled through Lewis, a former Poets football star turned popular school administrator. "Our kids have so much baggage, and the way I approach them is as a father figure, the way Coach Pompey and Coach Wade did to me, where they gave you that individual time, but you know not to cross that line," Lewis said.
NEWS
By Arnesa A. Howell and Arnesa A. Howell,Special to The Sun | April 6, 2008
With her signature cornrows and velvety-smooth voice, Susan L. Taylor is best known as the striking editor-in-chief of Essence magazine who inspired countless African-American women with words of hope, encouragement and self-love through her In the Spirit columns. But now, Taylor is giving a voice to the National Cares Mentoring Movement, a campaign she initially founded as Essence Cares to increase the number of black mentors for at-risk youth in communities across the country. Having recently stepped down as the magazine's editorial director, Taylor is working to make the faith community part of the outreach effort that includes the National Urban League, 100 Black Men of America Inc., The Links Inc. and the YWCA.
SPORTS
By Tim Schwartz, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
Baltimore native Lydell Henry, 36, has been around wrestling his whole life. But everywhere he went, wrestling was disappearing. A 1995 graduate of Dunbar High, Henry placed second in the Maryland Scholastic Association tournament his junior year. He went on to wrestle at Morgan State, but in 1996, the school dropped the program. In 2002, Dunbar also eliminated wrestling. To restore Baltimore as a place where wrestlers can thrive, he and Hermondoz Thompson, also a 1995 Dunbar graduate, co-founded Beat the Streets - Baltimore in 2011.
NEWS
By Erin Hodge-Williams | February 17, 2014
"I'm reaching out to some of America's leading foundations and corporations on a new initiative to help more young men of color facing tough odds stay on track and reach their full potential. " President Barack Obama, 2014 State of the Union address. Talent is everywhere, but opportunity isn't. President Obama reminded us of that simple truth during his State of the Union Address, acknowledging individuals and initiatives that are finding new ways to uncover and create opportunities using vision, resolve and determination.
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