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By Sylvia Badger | March 29, 1998
SEVERAL HUNDRED people filled the Peabody Library for a party to benefit the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill -- Metropolitan Baltimore. Led by board president Kate Farinholt, this volunteer group works with individuals who suffer from mental illness, and with their families.One of the group's main goals is to educate the public about mental illness. It takes money to get the message out, so silent and live auctions were used at the party to help raise funds. Heavy bidding on items resulted in a lively cocktail hour in the library's lobby.
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NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | August 23, 1993
When George F. Berry III hopped a fence at Crownsville Hospital Center on July 10, the odds were stacked against him.He headed into dense woods, where passers-by were unlikely to see him. With temperatures hovering around 100 degrees and without water, police said his chances of surviving more than a few days were slim.And once he left the psychiatric hospital's grounds, no one looked for him. Nineteen days later, his decomposing body was found off Interstate 97, less than 1 1/2 miles from hospital grounds, by a motorist searching for water for an overheated car.Mr.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | February 16, 1998
PARIS -- Among the bad ideas Britain has picked up from the United States in recent years is the idea of "community care" for the mentally ill.It is not an ignoble idea in principle, but in practice it has proved a disaster in both countries. Unlike the United States, however, Britain has faced the facts and is going to abandon the policy.In mid-January, the Labor government of Prime Minister Tony Blair decided to reverse its program of closing mental institutions and releasing patients into the community, first adopted in the 1960s and accelerated in the 1980s, mainly under U.S. influence.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
THERE WAS MUCH wrong with the practice of institutionalizing mentally ill people, which was once widespread in this country. But the move to send these people back into their communities has produced many tragedies of its own -- in large part because the treatment resources necessary for helping them cope with life outside the hospital never appeared.Betty Keat was one of those tragedies. As detailed last Sunday by Sun reporter Scott Shane, Ms. Keat's violent death in January from police bullets was the culmination of a long history of aggressive behavior.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | February 16, 1993
Instead of seeking treatment in nursing homes, hospitals and state mental institutions, increasing numbers of Howard County's mentally ill seniors are turning to Taylor Manor Hospital's 2-year-old Geropsychiatric Program.Since opening as Howard County's only psychiatric program for elderly patients, the 20-bed Geropsychiatric Program has treated about 500 people for depression, anxiety, psychosis and memory difficulties.The program's reputation has spread, and hospital officials hope to expand the unit to 40 beds within five years.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
A fledgling group, dedicated to raising awareness of mental health issues, has revived a chapter of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill in Carroll County.Most members are parents of teen-agers or young adults diagnosed with mental illness, and they guard their identities."Our main focus is to create a better atmosphere and improve the facilities offered in Carroll County," said Pam, the mother of an adult coping with depression. "These people are challenged enough with illness. They don't need to be challenged finding the help they need."
NEWS
By JOANNA DAEMMRICH AND GARY GATELY and JOANNA DAEMMRICH AND GARY GATELY,STAFF WRITERS | April 26, 1991
Lois Miller dreamed of building a better home for people branded "crazy" and banished to mental wards.Day after day, she clung to her belief that many of these men and women she encountered belonged not in institutions but in homes, real homes, where they could make the transition to society.Finding neighbors willing to live next door to people fresh out of a state mental hospital, however, can be tricky, delicate business.In December, Miller thought she had found the perfect home, one that would provide patients round-the-clock supervision without letting them simply languish in institutions.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2004
HOUSTON - Bringing an abrupt end to a case that had ignited debate over condemning the mentally ill to die, Texas prison officials executed a killer yesterday who was a diagnosed schizophrenic, who once claimed that a plate of beans had spoken to him and who accused his sisters of being spies. Kelsey Patterson, 50, was killed by lethal injection. Patterson was convicted in the 1992 slaying of a businessman and the man's secretary in his hometown of Palestine. After the shootings, Patterson went home, took off all his clothes except his socks and stood in the middle of the street until the police came.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court has given mentally ill criminal defendants new constitutional protection against unwanted medication during trial and continued confinement once they regain their sanity.The decisions in the unrelated cases were both based on the majority's interpretation of the Constitution's guarantee of due process of law. Both provoked dissenting opinions from the court's newest member, Justice Clarence Thomas.In an opinion by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor in one of the cases, a 7-2 majority ruled that a state cannot force a mentally ill defendant to accept anti-psychotic medication during trial without an "overriding justification."
NEWS
By Joanna Daemmrich and Joanna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2000
Erica Margrethe Dibietz, an outspoken advocate for the mentally ill as a social worker and administrator at a Maryland psychiatric hospital, died of complications from lung cancer at Laurel Regional Hospital on Christmas Eve. She was 72 and had lived in Timonium. Ms. Dibietz began her career in social work in Baltimore during the mid-1970s, after having raised three children. She completed a fellowship at Kennedy Krieger Institute in East Baltimore, where she counseled children suffering from brain disorders and spent four years assisting low-income families in Cherry Hill.
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