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By Gerri Kobren | June 4, 1991
A lot of people think the mentally ill are crazy, Susan Kadis says.She wants everyone to know they're not. Nor are they incompetent or incapable of participating in decisions affecting their lives, she says.Ms. Kadis speaks from experience: without a careful balance of daily drugs, she'd be subject to mood shifts that can take her, for no apparent reason, to the depths of suicidal despair.In spite of her illness, or perhaps because of it, she is herself an active member of several advisory boards for agencies that serve the mentally ill. She's also the project director of a three-year effort to teach other mentally ill citizens how to function on boards, commissions and task forces, how to testify at legislative sessions, and generally how to be effective in improving services to the mentally ill.Known as LEAP -- the Leadership Empowerment Advocacy Program -- this program was originally proposed by Maryland's Mental Hygiene Administration and is jointly funded by the state and the National Institute of Mental Health, at an annual cost of $13,200.
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NEWS
May 19, 2014
What is it going to take for society to realize that treating mental Illness is a serious issue that needs funding and major revamping in this state ( "WMAR barricade suspect had been hospitalized for mental illness, mother says," May 14)? I had the very uncomfortable task of requesting a petition for emergency evaluation for a person suffering mental illness and drug and alcohol abuse before a judge in the Circuit Court of Anne Arundel County a few weeks ago. The judge, understanding the seriousness of the situation, granted the petition and expressed a verbal "good luck" to me with his order.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2001
PEG BRIDGE'S son is 46 years old, lives in Howard County and suffers from mental illness. Perhaps it's no surprise that she's reluctant to share his name and other details about his life. Despite years of effort, a stigma clings to mental illness. But Bridge and others like her are working to erase that perception. Bridge, 74, of Elkridge was honored recently by Howard County for her work with the Howard County chapter of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, an advocacy and support group.
NEWS
May 18, 2014
David Zurawick is the czar when it comes to matters on TV. I always enjoy listening to his commentary on the radio. His column, "Surveillance images give unfiltered feel to WMAR standoff coverage," (May 14), discussed the effects on the TV station and its viewers but never discussed the real issue. Too bad The Sun's headline didn't read, "Mental illness: What are we as a society doing about this horrible problem?" No one seems to want to deal with the real issue of mental illness, and for that we should be ashamed.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
When psychiatric hospitals began emptying their wards of patients in the 1970s, families suddenly were faced with the terrifying task of helping loved ones suffering from complex and at times unpredictable illnesses.Many families felt isolated, not knowing how to care for someone tormented by voices, delusions or other symptoms of severe mental illness. Agnes B. Hatfield, a professor of education at the University of Maryland, recognized the difficulties and did something about it.She helped to organize the Montgomery County Alliance for the Mentally Ill in 1978 and the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI)
NEWS
By Daniel P. Mears | April 22, 2002
WASHINGTON -- The Andrea Yates trial taught us that earlier identification and treatment of mental illness might have prevented a tragedy of unspeakable horror -- that of a mother murdering her own children. Many people might be surprised to learn, though, that many mentally ill youths walk in and out of our juvenile courts without ever being noticed or treated. The problem is that few states take mental illness seriously, and most do not assess the mental health needs of juvenile offenders.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1994
An Annapolis-based company specializing in the treatment of the mentally ill has opened its first Anne Arundel County facility in a Pasadena shopping center.American Day Treatment Centers, which now runs five facilities in Maryland, started accepting patients March 28 for intensive, daylong therapy. The center's official opening is Friday.Executive Director Heidi Katz said the center will specialize in short-term care for patients experiencing crises with depression or other serious mental problems.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
A prominent psychiatrist called yesterday for more stringent controls over seriously mentally ill patients to minimize the risks of violence.In a lecture before the American Psychiatric Association, which concluded five days of meetings in Baltimore yesterday, E. Fuller Torrey, a psychiatric researcher at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, acknowledged that his views were not "professionally or politically correct."For too long, he said, psychiatry has bowed to the "civil libertarians," opening the way to avoidable acts of violence committed by a small portion of the mentally ill."
NEWS
August 25, 1993
Had George F. Berry III been a child, the police would have been looking for him within hours after he was reported missing. A search also would have been conducted had he been an Alzheimer's patient who wandered from a nursing home.But Mr. Berry was neither a child nor an elderly person. He was a mental patient. When the 30-year-old man escaped over a fence at the Crownsville Hospital Center on July 10 -- a day so searingly hot that a person with fragile health could not be expected to last long -- no one even bothered to look.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel and Andrea Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2003
Douglas C. Lewis, a program director for services for the mentally ill, died Thursday of complications of adrenoleukodystrophy, a rare genetic disorder, at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Baltimore. He was 36. For seven years, he worked with mentally ill patients at Prologue, a day treatment program in Pikesville. He was the program director and left in 1995 when his illness prevented him from working and he had to start using a wheelchair. An avid bird watcher, he then served as a volunteer tour guide at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Vladimir Mehul Baptiste imagined conversations with his family, according to his mother, banged on the walls of his home screaming, "What's wrong with me?" and sat in a rainstorm because he said it felt good. The man now accused of ramming a stolen truck into the WMAR television station had been hospitalized at psychiatric facilities in recent years, his mother said in an interview. She expressed concern her son was using marijuana. Baptiste was under outpatient care as recently as Monday - one day before police say he barricaded himself into the Towson offices of Channel 2 news.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
I read the commentary by Richard E. Vatz ( "Stigma can be a good thing," April 8) in which he claimed that some mentally ill deserve a stigma. I wish I can say that I enjoyed his views, but I am very disappointed that someone employed as a professor at Towson University could be clueless about mental illness. The following statement is very offending and is far from the truth: "In fact, there is no evidence that mental health professionals and counseling can reduce violence or even identify dangerous people better than layperson.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
To say I was appalled by Richard Vatz's recent commentary on mental illness would be an understatement ( "Stigma can be a good thing," April 8). Mr. Vatz takes us back more than 50 years to psychiatrist and author Thomas Szasz' book, "The Myth of Mental Illness," while ignoring all the research and studies done since then. Mr. Vatz must lead a perfect life, with no depression, no thought disorder, no PTSD and no mood disorder, not even anxiety. So he's fine with stigmatizing all of the people he sees as having "fake" complaints who act out behaviors they "choose" to engage in. As he sees it, if you didn't seek help - and here I refer especially to what we know about Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans - it's your own fault, not because there is stigma.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
t is clear we need to provide reasonable treatment for the seriously mentally ill who refuse to seek treatment on their own. A clinical review panel of professionals and layment would ensure that mandatory treatment is not abused. Currently, many individuals and their families suffer from lack of mandatory treatment services. Our current laws and practices fail to provide the care needed for the seriously mentally ill. We can do better for our families, our friends and our neighbors.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | April 8, 2014
During an interview on the recent Fort Hood shootings committed by Army Spec. Ivan Lopez, who killed three people then himself, CNN's Chris Cuomo suggested that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder be referred to as just Post Traumatic Stress - leaving off "disorder" because of the "stigma" associated with the term. This is a clear example of the futility of eliminating stigma through rhetorical fiat. It simply cannot be done. The issue is decades old, and there is little, if any, reason to believe that there will ever be the elimination or even diminishment therein of stigma, defined as a source of infamy or disgrace.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Thanks for your recent editorial highlighting attempts by the National Alliance on Mental Illness Maryland and our partner organizations to pass legislation in this year's General Assembly that would require an independent investigation of the use of isolated confinement in the state's prisons ( "Isolated confinement," March 31). NAMI Maryland is concerned about the extensive use of isolated confinement and other forms of administrative segregation in both adult and juvenile state correctional facilities.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | May 5, 2006
Your spouse has cancer. Your child has diabetes. Your sister has multiple sclerosis. Diagnoses like these are difficult for patients and families to accept. Still, the very act of sharing the news engenders support. Neighbors bring meals. Friends offer help while the patient undergoes treatment. The boss understands you may be late to work. For people with brain disorders and their families, the scenario can play out in a different manner. Because of the stigma of mental illness, the process of accepting a diagnosis, finding treatment and garnering support can be an excruciating journey.
HEALTH
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
This spring, a group of college students will go about their usual campus routines, but with a voice only they can hear calling them names and making other distracting, disturbing sounds. In their case, the voice will come from a recording playing through earbuds as part of a research study. But researchers say the exercise could ultimately help increase awareness and break down the stigma that prevents those who suffer from auditory hallucinations and other symptoms of mental illness from getting the help they need.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on the Columbia Mall shooting, it is vitally important that people not remain silent but intervene to get a mentally disturbed people into treatment ( "With no warning," March 16). The recent Columbia Mall shooting should remind us that, since the Newtown massacre, there have been 44 additional shootings just in schools. Scientific research shows that how the media report on suicide, especially in school-age children, can inadvertently spread the idea - particularly if the coverage is sensationalized.
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