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Mental Retardation

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NEWS
April 28, 1993
The past few decades have seen a good deal of consciousness-raising about illnesses and defects that once mystified and even frightened much of society. And yet many able-bodied people are still made uneasy by certain of these disabilities -- mental retardation, for one.Earlier this month, the Columbia Council approved a program that should help bridge the gap between retarded citizens and the rest of the community. This action, for which the council is to be commended, is a small but important step toward erasing some of the remaining misconceptions about retardation.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 12, 2012
Americans have good levels of many important vitamins in their bodies, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . There still are some stark disparities, such as a 31 percent vitamin D deficiency in African Americans, but overall the assessment was pretty good, the federal agency determined from blood and urine samples collected from participants in its National Health and Nutrition Examination...
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NEWS
By N.Y. Times News Service | May 30, 1991
Scientists have discovered the gene behind the most common type of inherited mental retardation, a significant advance in understanding not only a mental defect but also the genes that help fashion human intelligence.In its mutant form, the gene causes a baffling kind of retardation, fragile X syndrome, that is proving to be more widespread the more adept experts have become at detecting and diagnosing it.With the discovery of the gene, doctors should now be able to diagnose the disease unequivocally.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 14, 2011
Margaret Ann Ulle, an advocate for the developmentally disabled, died of an infection Saturday at Roland Park Place. She was 91. Born Margaret Ann Black in Baltimore and raised in Pittsburgh and Ardmore, Pa., she earned a liberal arts degree at what was then Randolph-Macon Woman's College. She earned a diploma at Peirce Business College in Philadelphia and returned to Baltimore in 1942 and became secretary to several John Hopkins University presidents. She worked with Isaiah Bowman from 1942 to 1949 and Detlev Bronk from 1949 to 1951.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 1999
GLOUCESTER, Mass. -- No one taught Bruce McNeil to read in elementary school, and he stuttered so badly that a minute could go by before a word would form.Still, McNeil says, his elementary school teachers in Salem would force him to stand before his taunting classmates and try to read to them.They called him retarded. At first, the label stung. Then it merely hurt. As McNeil grew older, it seeped in and became part of him.He used it to win assistance from the state, calling himself one of the nation's few mentally retarded entrepreneurs.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | April 15, 1991
Youngsters from poor families are more likely to be mentally retarded and suffer lifelong learning disabilities because the nation's system of preventing those illnesses for the poor is in disarray, a report to the president concludes.The report, which is to be presented to the President's Committee on Mental Retardation next week, challenges federal and state governments to improve access to adequate health care for all."Our health-care system . . . is highly discriminatory against children -- particularly minority and poor children -- and should be restructured," said Albert A. Baumeister, one of the authors of the report.
NEWS
September 4, 1998
Dr. Harrie Rogers Chamberlin, 78, a member of the White House Advisory Committee on Mental Retardation under President Kennedy, died Monday in Chapel Hill, N.C., of cancer.Pub Date: 9/04/98
NEWS
By Mark K. Shriver | April 20, 2001
JOHN PAUL Penry has an IQ of 54. Ernest McCarver has an IQ of 67. Both men sit on death row, in Texas and North Carolina, respectively. Each man is mentally retarded. The U.S. Supreme Court will consider constitutional questions related to both cases this year. The McCarver case may well determine whether the Constitution permits the execution of criminals with mental retardation at all. Should the court make this decision, it would mark one of the most significant reversals in the law on capital punishment since the reinstitution of the death penalty in 1976.
NEWS
May 27, 1997
Names in the newsBob's BMW Motorcyclesin Jessup will be honored as the 1997 Employer of the Year by the Arc of Maryland for outstanding effort and commitment to employment of persons with mental retardation. The award will be presented during the association's statewide convention at 6: 30 p.m. Saturday at the awards banquet and masked ball at Solomons Holiday Inn, Solomons.Pub Date: 5/27/97
NEWS
July 9, 2003
CHARLOTTE MUNRO CURLES, age 74, of Wilmington, DE, formerly of Baltimore, died July 6, 2003. A memorial service will be held at 11 A.M., Saturday, July 12, at Saint David's Episcopal Church, Wilmington. In lieu of flowers the family suggests memorial contributions to Association for the Rights of Citizens with Mental Retardation (ARC), 1016 Centre Rd., Suite 1, Wilmington, DE 19805 or to Saint David's Episcopal Church, Gift Fund, 2320 Grubb Rd., Wilmington, DE 19810. Messages of condolence may be sent towww.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | September 21, 2008
At the beginning of the year, Debbie Cottrill handed out copies of the book My Friend with Autism to children in her son's class at Central Elementary School in Edgewater. She attached letters to parents explaining that Dean has autism and asked parents to go over the book with their children. Cottrill wants Dean's second-grade classmates to understand that he suffers from a neurological disorder that makes him shrink away from them when he is touched. She wants them to know that he wears headphones in the cafeteria because the lunchroom chatter hurts his hypersensitive ears.
NEWS
By Marc Mugmon and Lauren Dundes | March 10, 2008
The House of Delegates last week approved legislation that would save the state hundreds of thousands of dollars. But the savings comes with a terribly high human cost. House Bill 216 would give the state a monopoly on mandatory screening for genetic and congenital defects in newborns. It contains a dangerous exception that would allow parents to opt out of such screening - and thus consign some unlucky newborns to lives destroyed by disorders that might have been treated if detected early.
NEWS
By Harry Yost | November 6, 2006
If history is any guide, the state's intention with regard to the future of Maryland's four residential centers for people with mental retardation and developmental disabilities is crystal clear. Closed admissions, a steady stream of transfers, aging residents and understaffing have led to ever-decreasing populations at the residential centers. Even S. Anthony McCann, the secretary of the state's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said at a recent political forum that Maryland law and the Supreme Court's Olmstead decision require the closing of all such institutions.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
Each year, a growing percentage of America's babies are born too soon, before they're physically ready to come into the world. More of these infants are surviving than ever before - at least 500,000 in 2004. But the survivors face increased risks of cerebral palsy, mental retardation, vision problems, hearing deficits, and other developmental and learning issues. The economic consequences are staggering - at least $26.2 billion a year, according to a "conservative" estimate yesterday from a panel of experts assembled by the National Academies' Institute of Medicine.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
With one hand splashing water in a tank filled with rubber ducks and with a sly grin on his face, Kevin Zhou couldn't have seemed happier. For the 9-year-old pupil at Cedar Lane, a public school in Fulton for pupils with severe physical and mental disabilities, it was just one activity in a fun-filled morning on the grounds of the private Glenelg Country School. And while it might have looked like a scene from any school's field day outing, the duck pond and other activities at the Glenelg Country's eighth Spring Fun Fair were also the culmination of an in-depth lesson for Glenelg Country's freshmen about mental disability.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2005
Autumn Homes, a provider of group homes for severely disabled residents that lost its license last summer, was notified yesterday that it must repay the state $1.3 million, state officials said. Autumn Homes did not respond to repeated requests from state auditors for three years for records to document services provided in exchange for state money, according to the Developmental Disabilities Administration, a division of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. DDA banned admissions to Autumn Homes after the 2003 death of Toby Heller, a profoundly retarded woman whose caregivers did not follow up on a specialist's recommendation to have her evaluated for a tumor.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
Name: Kim HutchisonHonored by The Carroll County Sun for: Winning the 1990 Leadership Award from the Maryland chapter of the American Association on Mental Retardation for her work in matching the needs and skills of people with severe mental retardation with the requirements of jobs, inspiring the interest and support of employers, and motivating and developing a corps of dedicated, professional job coachesAge: 28Residence; hometown: Gettysburg, Pa.; WestminsterEducation:...
NEWS
By RICHARD HADDAD | December 3, 1991
Our children are retarded. Some of them were born with mental retardation as a result of a genetic defect; others suffered it from a birth injury or a childhood illness. Because of their retardation, few of our children will lead a normal life; and our responsibility for them does not end when they become adults.Naturally, we do whatever we can for our children to make their lives as rich as possible given their disability -- as parents, within our families and communities, and by advocating for them in the society at large.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 19, 2004
FOR THE FAMILY of Dawn Marie Garvin, who was tortured and mutilated before Steven Oken shot her in the head, Thursday night marked the end of 17 years of seeing Oken portrayed as the victim. Let's just cut to the chase and say that right at the top. For death penalty opponents - who have the dubious talent of being noble with the grief of the families of murder victims - it was Oken who was the victim in this matter. Garvin's brother, Fred A. Romano, her father, Fred J. Romano, her mother, Betty Romano, and all her other relatives and loved ones were just statistics.
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