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Mental Hygiene

NEWS
March 17, 2006
Leonard E. Albert, retired supervising budget manager for the Maryland Department of Budget and Fiscal Planning, died of lymphoma March 10 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pikesville resident was 78. Mr. Albert was born in Baltimore and raised on Park Heights Avenue. He graduated from City College in 1943 and served in the Navy as a pharmacist's mate from 1945 to 1946. He earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1948 and an accounting certificate from the Baltimore College of Commerce in 1962.
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NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Just weeks before Muhammad Zahid Iqbal's 5-year-old daughter, Eelaaf, was scheduled to have surgery to repair two dislocated hips, the Glen Burnie family received a letter from the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene that Eelaaf's health insurance was being eliminated. The family could not afford the estimated $20,000 for the procedure, and when Eelaaf developed asthma, Iqbal was forced to pay for an emergency room visit and medication that had previously been covered by insurance.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | January 20, 2006
For the fourth consecutive year, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. will introduce a slots proposal, this time as part of his 20-point legislative package, which includes a military retirement tax credit, medical malpractice legislation and a witness-intimidation bill, aides said yesterday. Although another defeat of slot machines, the governor's solution to school construction needs, could prove a liability in November's elections, Ehrlich is pushing for a plan anyway, saying competition from neighboring states, notably Pennsylvania, that have legalized slots would cost the state money.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | December 18, 2005
Seven years ago, when Maryland dairy farmers were fighting for the right to join a regional dairy compact to stem their steadily declining numbers, they were bitterly opposed by another major segment of the industry: the milk processors. Things haven't changed much today. Dairy farms still are disappearing in alarming numbers in Maryland. They are going out of business at a pace nearly twice the rate of the nation as a whole, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In rough numbers, Maryland had about 4,000 dairy farms in 1970.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | October 21, 2005
Anne Arundel County will spend $250,000 to examine the condition of shuttered buildings and other outdated infrastructure at Crownsville Hospital Center, a move that will help state officials determine the cost of cleaning up and reusing the heavily contaminated grounds. The state closed the 90-year-old psychiatric hospital in the summer of 2004, and Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens has expressed interest in the county's assuming control of the 544-acre campus. Nonprofit organizations use parts of the land, and Owens has envisioned it as an enclave for other nonprofit and social service agencies.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
DAIRY FARMERS need to be careful about what they wish for. They might get it. Take their desire to have their milk and farms inspected by the state Department of Agriculture rather than by the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. "We think we would get a fair shake with the Department of Agriculture," said Robert Ramsburg, a Frederick County dairy farmer and president of the Maryland Dairy Industry Association. "That's not always the case with the health department. "The inspection division should be under [the Maryland Department of Agriculture]
NEWS
April 15, 2005
Richard Nelson Seaborg, a Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene administrator, died of cancer Monday at Carroll Hospital Center. The Hampstead resident was 74. Born in Evanston, Ill., he served in the Navy from 1951 to 1954 and while stationed at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, met his future wife of 50 years, Phyllis Garmer. Mr. Seaborg earned a business administration degree from the University of Baltimore. He worked at the Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River and also worked in sales promotion at the International Harvester Co. on 25th Street and at Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2005
This winter's influenza has officially hit Carroll County, as in the rest of Maryland, officials said. The county has seen an increase in flu-like symptoms in the past two to three weeks, said Debbie Middleton, the county Health Department's program director for communicable diseases. "It's everywhere," she said. "We've noted an increase - probably in the last two to three weeks - like the rest of the state." Although influenza is not a reportable disease for which figures must be kept, Middleton said, "We know we have had an increase in flu or flu-like symptoms in the county."
NEWS
September 20, 2004
Nelson J. Sabatini, head of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, has informed his staff that he will leave his position at the end of the month. Sabatini's departure has been expected, although a date had not been set. He previously held the job under Gov. William Donald Schaefer, and reluctantly returned at the insistence of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., agreeing to stay through two legislative sessions. Sabatini, 64, plans to split his time between Hawaii and Maryland, and to launch a consulting business.
NEWS
August 22, 2004
Gretchen Jane Hartman, a dietitian and former division chief for the state health department, died Tuesday at St. Joseph Medical Center of complications from surgery after a fall. She was 90 and had lived for about 15 years at Edenwald in Towson, where she was chairwoman of its food committee. Miss Hartman, who was known as Jane, was a Pittsburgh-area native who earned a bachelor's degree in nutrition from West Virginia University and a master's degree from Drexel University. After working for several years in Pennsylvania, Miss Hartman moved to Baltimore and worked for several years as Sinai Hospital's director of dietetics.
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