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Mental Hygiene

NEWS
April 15, 2005
Richard Nelson Seaborg, a Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene administrator, died of cancer Monday at Carroll Hospital Center. The Hampstead resident was 74. Born in Evanston, Ill., he served in the Navy from 1951 to 1954 and while stationed at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, met his future wife of 50 years, Phyllis Garmer. Mr. Seaborg earned a business administration degree from the University of Baltimore. He worked at the Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River and also worked in sales promotion at the International Harvester Co. on 25th Street and at Hunt Valley.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2005
This winter's influenza has officially hit Carroll County, as in the rest of Maryland, officials said. The county has seen an increase in flu-like symptoms in the past two to three weeks, said Debbie Middleton, the county Health Department's program director for communicable diseases. "It's everywhere," she said. "We've noted an increase - probably in the last two to three weeks - like the rest of the state." Although influenza is not a reportable disease for which figures must be kept, Middleton said, "We know we have had an increase in flu or flu-like symptoms in the county."
NEWS
September 20, 2004
Nelson J. Sabatini, head of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, has informed his staff that he will leave his position at the end of the month. Sabatini's departure has been expected, although a date had not been set. He previously held the job under Gov. William Donald Schaefer, and reluctantly returned at the insistence of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., agreeing to stay through two legislative sessions. Sabatini, 64, plans to split his time between Hawaii and Maryland, and to launch a consulting business.
NEWS
August 22, 2004
Gretchen Jane Hartman, a dietitian and former division chief for the state health department, died Tuesday at St. Joseph Medical Center of complications from surgery after a fall. She was 90 and had lived for about 15 years at Edenwald in Towson, where she was chairwoman of its food committee. Miss Hartman, who was known as Jane, was a Pittsburgh-area native who earned a bachelor's degree in nutrition from West Virginia University and a master's degree from Drexel University. After working for several years in Pennsylvania, Miss Hartman moved to Baltimore and worked for several years as Sinai Hospital's director of dietetics.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
Dr. Alice Tobler, a retired top state mental health official who wrote an influential 1960s report advocating reforms in her field, died of congestive heart failure Friday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 98 and formerly lived in Guilford. In October 1963, following an initiative of President John F. Kennedy about mental illness and mental retardation, she was named director of Maryland Mental Health Planning. In this capacity she pushed to release the mentally ill from poorly equipped state hospitals while suggesting that patients be treated in community clinics.
NEWS
July 14, 2004
On July 10, 2004, SAMUEL M.; beloved husband of the late Diane C. Furnari; loving father of Michael S. Furnari, Deborah L. Furnari and Matthew P. Furnari and his wife Sandra; grandfather of Brian and Sarah Furnari. Also survived by many loving siblings, nieces, nephews, friends and his extended family from Morningside House. He was honorably discharged after serving four years in the United States Air Force during Korea; retired with 27 years of service from the State of Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; attended St. Mark's Catholic Church in Fallston, will be missed by all. Friends may call at the JOHNSON FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 8521 Loch Raven Blvd.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 12, 2004
A southern Maryland child recently adopted from China has been confirmed as having measles but is no longer infectious, according to state health officials. The child, whose family and community were not identified, was among a group of a dozen adopted from China. Three other children - all of whom now reside in Washington - also have been confirmed as having measles, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Maryland health officials notified hospitals and health offices across the state of the measles case late last week, said Karen Black, a spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
March 13, 2004
Ellen Patricia McLee, a clerk who worked for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, died March 6 of a cerebral cyst at St. Agnes HealthCare. She was 46 and lived in Catonsville. She was born Ellen Patricia Bunn in Baltimore and raised in Harlem Park. She was a 1975 graduate of Carver Vocational Technical High School and attended the Community College of Baltimore. She began working for the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and at her death was a fiscal clerk assigned to the agency's Spring Grove Hospital Center in Catonsville.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
Faced with $25 million in cuts to the state's mental health budget, service providers statewide are laying off employees and closing or scaling back offerings. At stake are programs that they say keep low-income adults and children with the most disabling mental illnesses in schools and communities and out of hospitals, emergency rooms and jails. "These are the services for people with the most severe psychiatric disabilities in the entire mental health system," said Herb Cromwell, executive director of the Community Behavioral Health Association of Maryland.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
Faced with $25 million in cuts to the state's mental health budget, service providers statewide are laying off employees and closing or scaling back offerings. At stake are programs that they say keep low-income adults and children with the most disabling mental illnesses in schools and communities and out of hospitals, emergency rooms and jails. "These are the services for people with the most severe psychiatric disabilities in the entire mental health system," said Herb Cromwell, executive director of the Community Behavioral Health Association of Maryland.
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