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NEWS
May 26, 2013
Joy Charlene Naden, a longtime educator and executive on several Democratic political campaigns and chair of the Board of Review for the Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, died Saturdayat her Cross Keys home of acute myologic leukemia. She was 79. Born Joy Rosenberg and raised in Liberty Heights, Ms. Naden attended Forest Park High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Maryland in 1955, then received a master's degree in education from the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
Much has been made recently about proposed pay increases for some Maryland's politicians, but even the highest-earning elected officials don't come close to the top of the state-employee income scale. Gov. Martin O'Malley's 2012 income of $150,000 was just a fraction of the $2 million that Terps football coach Randy Edsall and men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon each pulled in, according to an updated state salary database made available by Maryland officials under a Public Information Act request.
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NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2002
The director of the state's Mental Hygiene Administration, Oscar L. Morgan, submitted his resignation this week and will leave at the end of the month, state health officials said last night. Morgan, 49, of Annapolis, was appointed director of the mental health agency - part of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene - in 1997, after three years as its deputy director. He was instrumental in implementing the state's public mental health system, run by Maryland Health Partners, a unit of Columbia-based Magellan Behavioral Health.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Luke Lavoie, Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 24, 2013
Howard County police found the convicted felon wanted in the shooting of an officer as the man limped along U.S. 1 Thursday morning, concluding a manhunt that had begun the day before while authorities canvassed the area. Stephon Prather, 29, was found walking with the help of two sticks near the spot where police said he exchanged gunshots Wednesday with three officers. Authorities said he had been shot twice in the legs and believe he spent the night in a storm drain where investigators later found a gun. Prather's capture came after hundreds of officers — including aviation, canine and foot patrol units — scoured a half-mile-wide wooded area along the busy thoroughfare in Laurel.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Charles "Chuck" Busnuk, a retired Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene grants writer, died of cancer Aug. 31 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 64 and lived in Canton. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, he was a 1966 graduate of Archbishop Curley High School, where he played the cymbals in the school band. He earned a bachelor's degree in geography from Morgan State University. In 1970, he became a juvenile counselor for the Juvenile Services Administration.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,Sun reporter | February 11, 2008
R. Charles Dannettel Jr., who worked for 22 years as the chief of engineering for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, died of pneumonia Thursday at Stella Maris Hospice. The White Hall resident was 79. A Baltimore native who was raised in Roland Park, he was a 1946 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He earned an engineering degree at the Johns Hopkins University in 1950. Mr. Dannettel followed in the academic path of his father, who also graduated from Poly and earned an engineering degree from Johns Hopkins.
HEALTH
August 5, 2010
BALTIMORE (AP) — Maryland health officials are reporting two more heat-related deaths, bringing the total for the year to 19. Department of Health and Mental Hygiene spokesman David Paulson said Thursday that both deaths occurred early last week. He says the residents of Anne Arundel and Somerset counties both suffered from heart disease and were found in homes without air conditioning. Paulson says hospitals have reported 1,274 heat-related or dehydration visits from July 1 to Tuesday.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
A Carroll County adult has become the 17 t h heat-related death in the state, according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The person was working outside and collapsed. As with most others who have died from heat-related illnesses this summer, heart disease was a factor. Meredith.cohn@baltsun.com Twitter.com/baltsunhealth
NEWS
Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
Much has been made recently about proposed pay increases for some Maryland's politicians, but even the highest-earning elected officials don't come close to the top of the state-employee income scale. Gov. Martin O'Malley's 2012 income of $150,000 was just a fraction of more than $2 million that Terps football coach Randy Edsall and men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon each pulled in, according to an updated state salary database made available by Maryland officials under a Public Information Act request.
NEWS
March 17, 2006
Leonard E. Albert, retired supervising budget manager for the Maryland Department of Budget and Fiscal Planning, died of lymphoma March 10 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pikesville resident was 78. Mr. Albert was born in Baltimore and raised on Park Heights Avenue. He graduated from City College in 1943 and served in the Navy as a pharmacist's mate from 1945 to 1946. He earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1948 and an accounting certificate from the Baltimore College of Commerce in 1962.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
A case of Eastern equine encephalitis was confirmed in Worcester County, state health officials said Friday. The disease is rare in humans, but officials with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene used the incident to warn residents to take precautions to prevent mosquito-borne diseases. The last confirmed human case in Maryland was in 1989 and the last confirmed case in a horse was in 2009. The horse in Worcester County had not been vaccinated, officials said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
State lawmakers are considering changing personnel laws for county health officers, following the messy and public firing of Anne Arundel's health officer earlier this year. "We need to move forward," Del. Joseline Pena-Melnyk told attendees of a meeting in Annapolis Wednesday of a group called the Caucus of African-American Leaders. Pena-Melnyk, a Democrat who represents Prince George's and Anne Arundel, said she'll seek to form a work group in the House of Delegates to review how health officers are hired and fired.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Dr. Ruth H. Singer, a retired physician who was a state health administrator and later worked in AIDS and HIV treatment at Chase Brexton Health Services, died of pancreatic cancer May 27 at her North Baltimore home. She was 69. "What one loved about Ruth is that she never held back," said Dr. Alfred "Al" Sommer, dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. "If something was too soft and dreamy, she insisted on facing the practical nature of the course of action and hoped for an outcome.
NEWS
May 26, 2013
Joy Charlene Naden, a longtime educator and executive on several Democratic political campaigns and chair of the Board of Review for the Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, died Saturdayat her Cross Keys home of acute myologic leukemia. She was 79. Born Joy Rosenberg and raised in Liberty Heights, Ms. Naden attended Forest Park High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Maryland in 1955, then received a master's degree in education from the Johns Hopkins University.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 13, 2013
The consent forms teenagers must get signed by their parents before using a tanning bed could soon change. The State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is recommending that the form include a clearer and more focused warning about the dangers of tanning beds, including the risk of cancer. Parents will also have to show a government-issued ID when signing the consent form for their children. The form will expire six months after being signed.   The health department was trying to better inform parents as they make the decision whether to allow their children to tan, said Dr. Clifford Mitchell, director of the state's Environmental Health Bureau.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial on making it easier for families to commit a mentally ill relative to a mental institution against their will, Maryland's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and some state delegates apparently are missing the urgent need to clarify the state's civil commitment standards ("The tricky question of involuntary commitment," April 6). Many relatives of individuals with serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, recently testified about the consequences of the denying timely treatment under the current law. Those consequences include homicide, suicide, homelessness, job loss and permanent brain damage.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | May 1, 1994
25 Years Ago* Crownsville State Hospital contains the highest percentage of Negro patients of any state mental hospital, according to the Maryland Department of Mental Hygiene. Before desegregation in 1963, Crownsville was all-Negro and the other three state hospitals were all white. -- The Sun, May 1, 1969.* County Executive Joseph W. Alton, Jr. yesterday recommended a record county budget, a $3 property tax for each $100 of assessed valuation and a 50 percent "piggyback" income tax to finance it. -- The Sun, May 2, 1969.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 12, 1998
Lyme disease cases in Maryland increased 17 percent last year, according to figures released recently by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Officials believe the increase is because of better public awareness and reporting.There were 493 confirmed cases reported in 1997, compared with 423 in 1996, said Dr. Clifford Johnson, the state's public health veterinarian.The disease is transmitted by ticks and symptoms include a circular, expanding reddish rash.Pub Date: 5/12/98
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Pikesville and Catonsville are the next area locations to be sprayed for mosquitoes in response to cases of West Nile Virus, Baltimore County Department of Health officials said Friday. The Maryland Department of Agriculture will spray parts of Pikesville Sept. 18 and parts of Catonsville Sept. 19. Officials recommend residents and their pets stay inside during the spraying, after 7:30 p.m., of Biomist 30-30, though the active ingredient permethrin is approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
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