Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMental Health Professionals
IN THE NEWS

Mental Health Professionals

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - Military doctors at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have aided interrogators in conducting and refining coercive interrogations of detainees, including providing advice on how to increase stress levels and exploit fears, according to new, detailed accounts given by former interrogators. The accounts, in interviews with The New York Times, come as mental health professionals are debating whether the doctors - psychiatrists and psychologists at the prison camp - have violated professional ethics codes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2013
Bowing to pressure from some fellow Democrats in the legislature, Gov. Martin O'Malley has signaled a willingness to compromise on at least one element in the package of new gun restrictions he proposed in the aftermath of last year's school shooting in Newtown, Conn. And in a surprise, given the massive lobbying effort against his bill, the change actually makes it better. Aides now say the governor will support a provision to keep guns out of the hands of mentally ill people that is even tougher than one presently on the books.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,New York Times News Service | October 6, 1992
The symptoms can run the gamut from headaches and chest pains to memory loss and extreme apathy. The diagnoses can range from heart disease to Alzheimer's. But the real cause is often depression, a disorder of epidemic proportions that is HTC typically unrecognized, misdiagnosed or improperly treated.According to various surveys and studies, fewer than half of Americans consider depression to be a health problem, and more than two in five say it is a sign of personal weakness.As a result, many depressed people never bring their problems to medical attention.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Sitting around a broad table in a nondescript office in Reisterstown last week, more than a dozen mental health advocates, medical professionals and law enforcement officials stared tensely at one another. Nearly a month after the state-created task force issued a report outlining its findings on psychiatric patients' access to firearms, several members were questioning a key recommendation - that mental health professionals should be required to report to law enforcement all patients who threaten suicide.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Sitting around a broad table in a nondescript office in Reisterstown last week, more than a dozen mental health advocates, medical professionals and law enforcement officials stared tensely at one another. Nearly a month after the state-created task force issued a report outlining its findings on psychiatric patients' access to firearms, several members were questioning a key recommendation - that mental health professionals should be required to report to law enforcement all patients who threaten suicide.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
When the ailment is physical, people typically know what to do: call the doctor, head to the hospital or consult the Internet for medical advice. When the ailment is behavioral, mental health professionals say, many don't know what to do or whom to turn to, or they hesitate at the thought of talking to a psychiatrist. Mental health officials in Anne Arundel County say they want to open people's minds to valuing mental wellness. That means eliminating the stigma associated with treatment.
NEWS
March 11, 2006
A Baltimore County schoolteacher has been charged with theft after students reported that money and jewelry were stolen from their gym lockers, county police said yesterday. Louis Michael Clark, a gym teacher at Dundalk High School, was charged with 12 counts of petty theft, police said. Clark, 25, of the 9700 block of Matzon Road in Middle River was arrested Thursday in the school office and was released on $15,000 bond to await trial, according to police. His arrest came after a four-month investigation into thefts from nine students' lockers, police said.
NEWS
December 22, 2012
I am grateful to Mark Komrad for his expert commentary related to persuading a troubled loved one or friend into professional mental health treatment and The Sun for publishing it ("Helping them to get help," Dec. 19). I would like to emphasize a point Dr. Komrad made twice: Mental illness should not be equated with crime. Mistakenly, some of the public identify mass killers, as in Newtown, Conn., with all people with any mental illness. Consequently, the social stigma of mental illness is an added burden people with these illnesses must bear.
NEWS
February 20, 2013
Bowing to pressure from some fellow Democrats in the legislature, Gov. Martin O'Malley has signaled a willingness to compromise on at least one element in the package of new gun restrictions he proposed in the aftermath of last year's school shooting in Newtown, Conn. And in a surprise, given the massive lobbying effort against his bill, the change actually makes it better. Aides now say the governor will support a provision to keep guns out of the hands of mentally ill people that is even tougher than one presently on the books.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
The state will sue the former head of Crownsville Hospital Center, who faked his resume to get the job, to recoup his salary, Deputy Attorney General Ralph S. Tyler III said yesterday.Mr. Tyler said a complaint against Haroon R. Ansari will be filed in Circuit Court within two weeks. "We will file a lawsuit based on fraud and breech of contract."The civil suit against Mr. Ansari, who resigned last week when confronted with the false information on his resume, will seek $63,000 in damages, the amount paid the 33-year-old superintendent during his tenure at the psychiatric hospital.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
When 2 a.m. came Friday, the sound of coins hitting metal — electronically replicated, of course, since the slot machines pay out with a printed ticket — continued at Maryland Live casino. About 1,000 people stayed where they were, plugging money into the video terminals and ordering drinks. Terry Cohen of Randallstown was there to celebrate the new schedule that will keep the casino open 24 hours a day. "There's nothing to do around here at night," she said. "The town shuts down.
NEWS
By Frederick H. Bealefeld III | December 26, 2012
After 31 years in local law enforcement, I'd often tell myself that I had seen and experienced every act of cruelty man can inflict. In light of the despicable act of violence this month in Newtown, Conn., I was clearly wrong. We are learning more, day by agonizing day, of the details of the crime, the history of Adam Lanza, the heroism of the school staff, and the stolen wonder of 20 beautiful little children. An incredible and horrible tragedy - but one that perhaps could have been averted had we reacted to the outrages of the past.
NEWS
December 22, 2012
I am grateful to Mark Komrad for his expert commentary related to persuading a troubled loved one or friend into professional mental health treatment and The Sun for publishing it ("Helping them to get help," Dec. 19). I would like to emphasize a point Dr. Komrad made twice: Mental illness should not be equated with crime. Mistakenly, some of the public identify mass killers, as in Newtown, Conn., with all people with any mental illness. Consequently, the social stigma of mental illness is an added burden people with these illnesses must bear.
NEWS
January 18, 2011
I am writing to clarify a misunderstanding about social workers printed in the editorial "Tucson and mental health" (Jan. 16). Referring to the proposed Mental Health First Aid program, the editorial states that "social workers, college counselors, teachers and others can help until professional aid is available. " This statement suggests that social workers are not professionally trained to deal with mental health problems. This inaccuracy is troubling because clinical social workers have been providing mental health services for nearly a century and are licensed by the state of Maryland to diagnose and treat mental health disorders.
NEWS
March 11, 2006
A Baltimore County schoolteacher has been charged with theft after students reported that money and jewelry were stolen from their gym lockers, county police said yesterday. Louis Michael Clark, a gym teacher at Dundalk High School, was charged with 12 counts of petty theft, police said. Clark, 25, of the 9700 block of Matzon Road in Middle River was arrested Thursday in the school office and was released on $15,000 bond to await trial, according to police. His arrest came after a four-month investigation into thefts from nine students' lockers, police said.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
When the ailment is physical, people typically know what to do: call the doctor, head to the hospital or consult the Internet for medical advice. When the ailment is behavioral, mental health professionals say, many don't know what to do or whom to turn to, or they hesitate at the thought of talking to a psychiatrist. Mental health officials in Anne Arundel County say they want to open people's minds to valuing mental wellness. That means eliminating the stigma associated with treatment.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 30, 1992
David was depressed. His girlfriend had just broken up with him, and he felt lonely and helpless.Spotting a newspaper ad offering telephone counseling any time of the day, the 35-year-old New Yorker dialed the 900 number. For the next 20 minutes, at $3.99 a minute, David hashed over his feelings with a licensed, certified therapist ensconced in a Los Angeles office building.By the time he hung up, David said, he felt confident that he could come to grips with the end of the relationship, and he thanked the therapist.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | November 4, 2001
After witnessing the horror of Sept. 11, Kathy Pinney of Ruxton knew she needed to take steps to keep herself calm. So since that day, she has attended yoga class three times a week, stretching and flexing her way to inner peace. What had been a casual interest has now become a devotion. "I don't know where I'd be without it," says Pinney, 48, who grew up in the Bronx and remembers watching the World Trade Center being built when she was a child. "This has kept me focused and centered and real.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - Military doctors at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have aided interrogators in conducting and refining coercive interrogations of detainees, including providing advice on how to increase stress levels and exploit fears, according to new, detailed accounts given by former interrogators. The accounts, in interviews with The New York Times, come as mental health professionals are debating whether the doctors - psychiatrists and psychologists at the prison camp - have violated professional ethics codes.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | November 4, 2001
After witnessing the horror of Sept. 11, Kathy Pinney of Ruxton knew she needed to take steps to keep herself calm. So since that day, she has attended yoga class three times a week, stretching and flexing her way to inner peace. What had been a casual interest has now become a devotion. "I don't know where I'd be without it," says Pinney, 48, who grew up in the Bronx and remembers watching the World Trade Center being built when she was a child. "This has kept me focused and centered and real.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.