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HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Bryan Johnson didn't know he had bipolar disorder until he ended up at the emergency room, where he assaulted a police officer. His family had taken him to the University of Maryland Medical Center because he was acting strangely, staring into the distance and constantly pacing as he struggled with the death of his brother and the loss of his job. He was sent to Central Booking as soon as he was released from the hospital, and wound up with a...
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NEWS
By Jeffrey A. Schaler and Richard E. Vatz | October 9, 2012
Thomas Stephen Szasz, arguably the world's foremost psychiatrist, died Sept. 8. 2012. Former psychiatrist and current columnist Charles Krauthammer wrote that "Szasz is the kind of author no one reads but everyone knows about. " That's unfortunate. Too many mental health professionals haven't the foggiest idea who Thomas Szasz was and why he will remain important to fields of science, medicine, ethics, law — and particularly mental health — for centuries to come. Dr. Szasz, who received an honorary doctorate from Towson University in 1999, adopted the premises of Rudolf Virchow, the Austrian pathologist who defined disease consistent with all serious pathologists.
NEWS
August 23, 2012
The arrest last month of a Maryland man for allegedly threatening to commit a mass murder at his former workplace inevitably drew comparisons to the shooting at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater that had occurred a few days earlier, leaving 12 people dead and 58 wounded. Both incidents raised questions about how people apparently suffering from mental illnesses managed to obtain firearms and whether tougher state and federal gun laws might have prevented them from doing so. That should be one of the first orders of business for the state task force that convened this week to consider changes to Maryland's laws governing gun access by the mentally ill. But the issue may not lend itself to an easy or quick resolution.
HEALTH
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
John Elder Robison taught himself electronics while growing up and was so skilled that despite dropping out of high school in ninth grade, he designed pyrotechnic guitars for the rock group Kiss and sound effects for electronic games. Yet to hear him tell it, some of Robison's greatest work comes while he's standing on stage speaking to crowds about how he's lived with Asperger syndrome and conveying to young people with the disorder a message that no one told him when he was a child.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | January 27, 2011
disease: n. A pathological condition of a part, organ, or system of an organism resulting from various causes, such as infection, genetic defect, or environmental stress, and characterized by an identifiable group of signs or symptoms. — American Heritage Dictionary I have been teaching and writing for decades on the topic of "rhetoric and mental illness," arguing that "mental illness" has been a catch-all term of behavioral explanation that elucidates nothing and is often false; there is usually no "disease" in mental illness.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | July 17, 2006
When researchers announced that 16 million Americans who fly into occasional fits of unwarranted rage may suffer from a mental illness called "intermittent explosive disorder," the diagnosis drew its share of hoots and howls. "Your grandmother would say these are bad folks who can't control their temper, and she would be right," said Dr. E. Fuller Torrey, an outspoken schizophrenia expert alarmed by the ever-expanding list of behaviors and attitudes branded as illnesses. Torrey and other critics point to the volume that doctors use to determine mental illness, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, as evidence that the world is out of control.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 6, 2006
CHICAGO -- One in 20 Americans might be susceptible to uncontrollable anger attacks in which they lash out in road rage, spousal abuse or other severe transgressions that are totally unjustified, researchers from Harvard and the University of Chicago have found. Their nationwide study found that the condition called intermittent explosive disorder, or IED, is not the rare occurrence that psychiatrists had thought. Four to five percent of people in the study were found to have physically assaulted someone, threatened bodily harm or destroyed property in a rage an average of five times a year.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | April 14, 2006
If Your Adolescent Has an Eating Disorder: An Essential Resource for Parents By Timothy Walsh, M.D., and V.L. Cameron Oxford University Press/$9.95 It is heartbreaking to have a child with an eating disorder. But it's worse if you don't feel you have support, good information or a roadmap to recovery. This book, If Your Adolescent Has an Eating Disorder, is an excellent way to get grounded. It contains some of the best information you will find on the subject. In 2003, the nonprofit Annenberg Foundation Trust launched an Adolescent Mental Health Initiative, setting up seven commissions on mental disorders that begin between ages 10 and 22. The result: a mammoth treatise called Treating and Preventing Adolescent Mental Health Disorders (2005)
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 7, 2005
Almost 50 percent of Americans will develop a mental illness at some point in their lives, a new study has found, and most will not receive the proper treatment. Researchers led by Harvard epidemiologist Ronald C. Kessler fanned out across the country to assess the rates of mental illness in dozens of U.S. communities in a survey conducted from 2001 to 2003. Thousands answered questions about their thoughts and behavior, in a detailed assessment called the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth revision)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
Echoing Vietnam and other wars, combat duty in Iraq and Afghanistan has triggered symptoms of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder among many troops returning home. Researchers reporting in a medical journal today found that 15 percent to 17 percent of the combat troops who served in Iraq suffered from at least one of the three disorders - yet few sought help because they feared being stigmatized. A somewhat lower proportion, 11.2 percent, reported symptoms of mental distress after serving in Afghanistan, but most also kept their problems secret.
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