Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMental Disorders
IN THE NEWS

Mental Disorders

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 9, 1990
Several serious mental health disorders traditionally viewed as illnesses of adulthood are more likely to begin during adolescence rather than any other time of life, a study by the National Institute of Mental Health has found.The study supports the belief of many experts that a greater emphasis should be placed on diagnosing and treating mental disorders among individuals under age 20."These findings underscore the importance of detecting and treating mental illnesses and substance abuse early, before they ruin a person's life," said the institute's director, Lewis L. Judd.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Most people who kill themselves do so from a place of great pain, hopelessness, self-worthlessness and despair. But suicide is best explained not with reference to the concepts of philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre (as was done in the Sept. 24 commentary, "Explaining the inexplicable: suicide" . That's like trying to explain why people die from malaria by quoting Aristotle. Severe depression is an illness. Everybody should know that. States with the highest rates of people taking their own lives have many characteristics in common, including a shortage of facilities for the treatment of mental disorders; proportionately larger populations of groups most prone to suicide, including Caucasians, Native Americans and men; higher rates of alcohol abuse, unemployment, poverty, geographic and social isolation; widespread gun ownership; and the "cowboy mentality" in which self-reliant individualism is lauded and help-seeking is eschewed, and as a result, psychology, psychiatry and mental health practitioners often are looked upon with suspicion or distain.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
Jason Aaron DeLong suffers from three mental disorders and a neurological defect that would have made planning his mother's murder impossible, a psychiatrist for the defense said yesterday.Rather, the killing was a release of the lifelong rage Mr. DeLong felt toward Cathryn Brace Farrar because she neglected him and abused him physically and sexually, said Ellen McDaniel, a psychiatrist who practices in Towson."There was this outpouring of tremendous fear and rage beyond his control," Dr. McDaniel said.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
The recent incident of a man driving a truck into the WMAR television studio involved a person reported to suffer from mental illness and a cannabis use disorder, yet the press continues to hype up the mental health diagnosis and play down the substance abuse ( "WMAR barricade suspect had been hospitalized for mental illness, mother says," May 14). What will it take for people to understand that there is a high prevalence of co-occurring substance use and mental disorders? Yes, people may hear voices, but adding a substance to that can be fatal.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
Maryland's new Center for Excellence on Early Intervention for Serious Mental Illness holds out the promise that for some people with mental illness — especially psychosis — early intervention may reduce the chance, already small, that they will become killers. Any reduction in the growing trend toward murder and mass murder in our country would be welcome. This plan is a refinement of an approach, long practiced though currently under attack, of early intervention and treatment, almost always with psychotropic drugs, of behavior that is diagnosed as "early onset" schizophrenia in children who have psychotic symptoms — usually, paranoia, delusions and hallucinations.
TOPIC
By HOWARD H. GOLDMAN | January 23, 2000
THE ATTACK by Richard E. Vats on the rigor of Surgeon General David Satcher's report is long on rhetoric and short on science. The report reflects the best evidence on the epidemiology of mental disorders from the world's leading experts, who were contributors and reviewers for the document. As underscored by the Surgeon General, the worldwide magnitude of the problem of disability attributable to mental disorder is reflected in a recent study of the global burden of disease conducted by the World Bank, the World Health Organization and the Harvard School of Public Health.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 1996
Parents who have a mental illness are at a higher risk of abusing or neglecting their children, a Johns Hopkins University study has found.In a study of nearly 10,000 parents, 58.5 percent of those who abused their children suffered from a mental illness, as did 69.3 percent of parents who neglected their children, Dr. Yuriko Egami reported in a recent issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry."
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1998
Medical ethicists meeting in Baltimore yesterday unveiled a 20-point national proposal aimed at better protecting people with mental disorders who take part in medical research.The draft report, which will be formally considered Tuesday by the National Bioethics Advisory Commission at a meeting in Miami, calls for a raft of new regulations as well as a standing federal panel to weigh in on research involving individuals with impaired decision-making skills.Although the plan may undergo some last-minute revisions this week, it is expected to be approved.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | May 28, 1995
Hoping to demonstrate the need for Howard County's services for children with serious emotional and mental disorders, local advocacy groups last week took a group of state and county politicians on a tour of area programs."
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN | April 14, 2006
If Your Adolescent Has an Eating Disorder: An Essential Resource for Parents By Timothy Walsh, M.D., and V.L. Cameron Oxford University Press/$9.95 It is heartbreaking to have a child with an eating disorder. But it's worse if you don't feel you have support, good information or a roadmap to recovery. This book, If Your Adolescent Has an Eating Disorder, is an excellent way to get grounded. It contains some of the best information you will find on the subject. In 2003, the nonprofit Annenberg Foundation Trust launched an Adolescent Mental Health Initiative, setting up seven commissions on mental disorders that begin between ages 10 and 22. The result: a mammoth treatise called Treating and Preventing Adolescent Mental Health Disorders (2005)
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | April 8, 2014
During an interview on the recent Fort Hood shootings committed by Army Spec. Ivan Lopez, who killed three people then himself, CNN's Chris Cuomo suggested that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder be referred to as just Post Traumatic Stress - leaving off "disorder" because of the "stigma" associated with the term. This is a clear example of the futility of eliminating stigma through rhetorical fiat. It simply cannot be done. The issue is decades old, and there is little, if any, reason to believe that there will ever be the elimination or even diminishment therein of stigma, defined as a source of infamy or disgrace.
NEWS
By Justin George and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The teenager who led a deadly January assault at The Mall in Columbia did not target his victims, but planned a killing spree inspired by the 1999 Columbine High School shootings, Howard County police revealed Wednesday. In a wide-ranging news conference that provided new details about the crime, police said Darion Marcus Aguilar was torn between violent impulses and efforts to treat his psychiatric problems. For months before the Jan. 25 incident, the 19-year-old had been frequenting websites that promoted violence and researching mass shootings on the Internet.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
Maryland's new Center for Excellence on Early Intervention for Serious Mental Illness holds out the promise that for some people with mental illness — especially psychosis — early intervention may reduce the chance, already small, that they will become killers. Any reduction in the growing trend toward murder and mass murder in our country would be welcome. This plan is a refinement of an approach, long practiced though currently under attack, of early intervention and treatment, almost always with psychotropic drugs, of behavior that is diagnosed as "early onset" schizophrenia in children who have psychotic symptoms — usually, paranoia, delusions and hallucinations.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Teenager Kendall Reitz set out to become an advocate for improved mental illness awareness in the aftermath of last year's massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., when a disturbed 20-year-old named Adam Lanza fatally shot 20 children and six adults. As horrific as the crime was, Kendall felt news coverage of that mass shooting and others fed false notions that people with mental illness tend to be violent. "It's just way blown out of proportion," she said.
NEWS
By René J. Muller | June 18, 2013
Days before the official May 22 publication date of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-5), a number of psychiatrists who were closely associated with the project scrambled to do some preemptory damage control, mostly by lowering the expectations for what was to come. Michael B. First, professor of psychiatry at Columbia, acknowledged on NPR that there was still no empirical method to confirm or rule out any mental illness. "We were hoping and imagining that research would advance at a pace that laboratory tests would have come out. And here we are 20 years later and we still unfortunately rely primarily on symptoms to make our diagnoses.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
I applaud the efforts of the University of Maryland in obtaining the funding needed to increase their mental health services ("UM adds funding for mental health," April 3). While money is important, it isn't everything. National statistics tell us there is a very high prevalence (50-to-75 percent) of co-occurring substance use and mental disorders, otherwise known as co-occurring disorders. It is the expectation, not the exception. So designing their treatment system to accommodate these individuals will assure better outcomes.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
A Catonsville man charged with a string of arsons in historic Ellicott City, Columbia and Baltimore County suffers from mental disorders ranging from hallucinations to kleptomania, according to court testimony.The mental condition of James McManus was the subject of a hearing yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court, where he pleaded guilty to two fires in Catonsville. The court must now decide whether he will be held criminally responsible."Although James McManus may look fine, his brain is sick," said Clarke Ahlers, a Columbia lawyer for the defendant.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
I applaud the efforts of the University of Maryland in obtaining the funding needed to increase their mental health services ("UM adds funding for mental health," April 3). While money is important, it isn't everything. National statistics tell us there is a very high prevalence (50-to-75 percent) of co-occurring substance use and mental disorders, otherwise known as co-occurring disorders. It is the expectation, not the exception. So designing their treatment system to accommodate these individuals will assure better outcomes.
NEWS
By Jeffrey A. Schaler and Richard E. Vatz | October 9, 2012
Thomas Stephen Szasz, arguably the world's foremost psychiatrist, died Sept. 8. 2012. Former psychiatrist and current columnist Charles Krauthammer wrote that "Szasz is the kind of author no one reads but everyone knows about. " That's unfortunate. Too many mental health professionals haven't the foggiest idea who Thomas Szasz was and why he will remain important to fields of science, medicine, ethics, law — and particularly mental health — for centuries to come. Dr. Szasz, who received an honorary doctorate from Towson University in 1999, adopted the premises of Rudolf Virchow, the Austrian pathologist who defined disease consistent with all serious pathologists.
NEWS
August 23, 2012
The arrest last month of a Maryland man for allegedly threatening to commit a mass murder at his former workplace inevitably drew comparisons to the shooting at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater that had occurred a few days earlier, leaving 12 people dead and 58 wounded. Both incidents raised questions about how people apparently suffering from mental illnesses managed to obtain firearms and whether tougher state and federal gun laws might have prevented them from doing so. That should be one of the first orders of business for the state task force that convened this week to consider changes to Maryland's laws governing gun access by the mentally ill. But the issue may not lend itself to an easy or quick resolution.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.