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By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Maryland's largest menorah was all lit up in Baltimore's McKeldin Square for the final night of Hanukkah on Wednesday. A parade of cars with smaller menorahs on their roofs made its way from Park Heights to downtown, for the celebration of the Jewish holiday. The event, which is put on by Chabad Lubavitch of Downtown Baltimore, drew about 450 people, organizers said. One volunteer, Mendy Kaltmann, 17, a 12th grader at Lubavitch Yeshiva of Baltimore, said the event was "really captivating.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Maryland's largest menorah was all lit up in Baltimore's McKeldin Square for the final night of Hanukkah on Wednesday. A parade of cars with smaller menorahs on their roofs made its way from Park Heights to downtown, for the celebration of the Jewish holiday. The event, which is put on by Chabad Lubavitch of Downtown Baltimore, drew about 450 people, organizers said. One volunteer, Mendy Kaltmann, 17, a 12th grader at Lubavitch Yeshiva of Baltimore, said the event was "really captivating.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2012
After mounting menorahs atop minivans and gathering in Park Heights, members of Baltimore's Jewish community paraded in a caravan south to the Inner Harbor, where they ate latkes and jelly doughnuts, danced and listened to traditional music before lighting the city's 30-foot-tall menorah in McKeldin Park. Under a misty rain Sunday evening, another Hanukkah season was marked downtown, with celebrants of the festival of lights proudly announcing their faith on Light Street. "Hanukkah has a special message, not only for people of the Jewish community but also for the larger community," said Rabbi Shmuel Kaplan, director of Chabad Lubavitch in Maryland, which helped organize the event.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
The Westfield Annapolis mall hosts its annual "Chanukah Wonderland" on Wednesday night. At 5 p.m., a giant menorah will be lit at the mall by H&M near the Green Garage. Participants can help build a giant Lego menorah, decorate Hanukkah keepsakes, take pictures with Judah the Maccabee, eat hot latkes and doughnuts and enjoy entertainment from Michael Rosman, known as the "Squire of the Wire" at the Maryland Renaissance Festival. The event is free and open to the public. Those who RSVP will receive a prize.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | January 18, 1994
JERUSALEM -- What could be more Jewish than Israel's menorah?Something less pagan, perhaps, according to some Jewish scholars.The seven-branch candelabrum has been taking a beating lately for its use, and alleged misuse, in Israel.The menorah symbolized on Israel's shekel and printed on all official letterheads is a bit of a fraud, contends Professor Daniel Sperber, former dean of the faculty of Basic Jewish Studies at Bar-Ilan University in Tel Aviv."It's a historical mistake," he said.It seems the base of the menorah used in Israel is copied from an arch in Rome built two millenniums ago, which in turn was most likely copied from a temple in southern Turkey built for the worship of Zeus, the Greek god of the heavens.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | December 20, 1994
Praising Cardinal William H. Keeler for his role in improving Jewish-Roman Catholic relations, representatives of Baltimore Jewry presented a silver menorah to him yesterday "as one who has spent his life spreading light to others."Rabbi Joel H. Zaiman, president of the Baltimore Jewish Council, spoke of Jewish leaders' anticipation that Archbishop Keeler would be raised to the rank of cardinal. "We knew it was only a question of time," Rabbi Zaiman said, "and better sooner than later."Noting "the remarkable changes in relations" between Jews and Catholics in recent years, Rabbi Zaiman said of the newly elevated cardinal, "Our friend is now one of the key Catholic leaders in this area of church life -- so we rejoice."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1996
The brothers worked late in the kitchen of their Northwest Baltimore home, concocting a masterpiece of a menorah from papier-mache, wood, cloth, beads, glue and youthful ingenuity.Their labor paid off yesterday, as Shalev and Avisha NessAiver were among the grand prize winners in the Jewish Community Center's menorah-making contest. The choice was made by vote of shoppers at Reisterstown Road Plaza, where the competing menorahs were on display this month and where about 200 people gathered for the JCC's Hanukkah celebration.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
Cardinal William H. Keeler joined Roman Catholic and Jewish leaders yesterday to light the first permanent menorah in Vatican City during the commemoration of Yom Hashoah, the annual Holocaust Memorial Day.The six-branch menorah was placed on the grounds of the Pontifical North American College, a seminary for American students studying for the priesthood in Rome. Keeler was chairman of the board of the college until recently and was instrumental in having the Menorah placed there."It is a reminder that people not forget the Shoah, the Holocaust," Keeler said in a telephone interview from Rome.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 2002
Dovy Dreidel, Goldy Gelt and Shamash the Candle made their first public appearances this week atop a flatbed trailer, standing beside a 6-foot-high menorah made of plastic drainage pipes. They visited Jewish day schools, senior residences and the parking lot of the Mall in Columbia. The whimsical characters and the menorah are part of Columbia's newest holiday fixture - the "Hanukkah Mobile." Driven around town by Rabbi Hillel Baron, the mobile was designed to entertain as well as educate residents about the eight-day Festival of Lights, which ends tomorrow.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1995
Schmuel Kaplan will be driving around town this Hanukkah season with an electric menorah strapped to the top of his car.What might seem like holiday exuberance to some is a matter of saving lives to the Lubavitch rabbi from Northwest Baltimore.Once the holiday begins at sunset tonight, the rabbi will screw in one bulb to commemorate an ancient "miracle of lights" that followed a Jewish victory over Syrian rulers.When Hanukkah ends one week and one day from now, eight electric candles powered through the cigarette lighter will burn from the 3-foot menorah on the roof of the rabbi's Honda Accord.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2012
After mounting menorahs atop minivans and gathering in Park Heights, members of Baltimore's Jewish community paraded in a caravan south to the Inner Harbor, where they ate latkes and jelly doughnuts, danced and listened to traditional music before lighting the city's 30-foot-tall menorah in McKeldin Park. Under a misty rain Sunday evening, another Hanukkah season was marked downtown, with celebrants of the festival of lights proudly announcing their faith on Light Street. "Hanukkah has a special message, not only for people of the Jewish community but also for the larger community," said Rabbi Shmuel Kaplan, director of Chabad Lubavitch in Maryland, which helped organize the event.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Next Saturday, the Baker family home will be full of light. On the first night of Hanukkah, the Bakers - Liz, Steve, and 7-year-old Matthew - will celebrate by lighting several menorahs in their home and in the Hampden studio where Steve Baker creates artwork, including menorahs, out of glass. "My son will light one," says Liz Baker. "I'll light one, and we'll walk down to my husband's studio, where Steve keeps menorahs in the window, and we'll light them as well. " Like many members of the Baltimore Jewish community, the Bakers have amassed a small collection of menorahs that's growing over time.
NEWS
December 22, 2008
A community Hanukkah celebration is planned for 7 o'clock tonight on the front lawn of Temple Oheb Shalom, 7310 Park Heights Ave., according to Mayor Sheila Dixon's office and Comprehensive Housing Assistance Inc. The annual event will feature the lighting of a grand menorah, entertainment by comedy juggler Michael Rosman, activities for children that include arts and crafts, face painting and balloon art, traditional Hanukkah food, and local vendors selling...
NEWS
November 30, 2007
Menorah lighting scheduled Dec. 9 Area synagogues, Jewish schools and organizations, and local officials will participate in a Hanukkah menorah-lighting ceremony at 4 p.m. Dec. 9 in Centennial Park, Ellicott City. A representative from each participating synagogue will light a candle of the 6-foot menorah. Music and singing is planned, and jelly doughnuts, a traditional Hanukkah food, will be served. The event is sponsored by the Jewish community of Howard County. Information: Helaine Brenner, 301-580-3400.
NEWS
March 20, 2007
Menorah Lodge, B'nai B'rith, is saddened at the passing of MICHAEL MERITT, a past president of the lodge and a tireless worker in support of the ideals of B'nai B'rith. May his family be comforted among the mourners of Zion.
NEWS
November 16, 2005
ANN WALOWITZ (nee Seltzer), on November 14, 2005, wife of the late Jacob; mother of Dr. Charles (Sylvia) Walowitz. Also survived by three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Relatives and friends are invited to services, Thursday, 11 A.M. at Joseph Levine and Son, North Broad above 71st Avenue. Interment Har Nebo Cemetery. Shiva will be observed Friday afternoon and Sunday at the residence of Dr. and Mrs. Charles Walowitz. In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory may be made to Menorah Manor Nursing Home, 255 59th Street North, St. Petersburg, FL, 33710.
NEWS
March 20, 2007
Menorah Lodge, B'nai B'rith, is saddened at the passing of MICHAEL MERITT, a past president of the lodge and a tireless worker in support of the ideals of B'nai B'rith. May his family be comforted among the mourners of Zion.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
The Westfield Annapolis mall hosts its annual "Chanukah Wonderland" on Wednesday night. At 5 p.m., a giant menorah will be lit at the mall by H&M near the Green Garage. Participants can help build a giant Lego menorah, decorate Hanukkah keepsakes, take pictures with Judah the Maccabee, eat hot latkes and doughnuts and enjoy entertainment from Michael Rosman, known as the "Squire of the Wire" at the Maryland Renaissance Festival. The event is free and open to the public. Those who RSVP will receive a prize.
NEWS
By Hans Knight | December 23, 2003
THE OTHER day, a strange sound wafted over the small, sylvan town of Moedling, just south of Vienna, Austria. It was a sound the town had not heard in 65 years. It came from the throat of a bearded young cantor who stood in front of a microphone in the crisp open air. He was singing the kaddish, the Hebrew prayer for the dead. It was not easy on the ear. Songs from tortured souls seldom are. But it seemed a fitting finale in the circumstances. The occasion was the dedication of a memorial to the old synagogue that had served the Jewish community since 1914, until the town's Nazis burned it down during the Kristallnacht in the fall of 1938.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 2003
It could have been a droll lecture on the story of Hanukkah. But when Rabbi Hillel Baron put on a toga, Roman helmet and shield, children and teachers moved closer as the director of Columbia's Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education brought the story to life. Baron, who spoke Wednesday to the preschool and kindergarten pupils at Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, discussed how Judas Maccabaeus led the successful Jewish revolt in 164 B.C. against the Syrian-Greek regime that governed Israel.
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