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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 11, 2012
Four more Marylanders have developed fungal meningitis after receiving a steriod injection for back pain as a national outbreak has grown to 170 victims in several states. In Maryland, 13 people have been diagnosed with the rare disease and 1,500 could have been exposed to it. One person in the state has died, but health officials have released no specifics about the case. The outbreak has been linked to the steroid methylprednisolone acetate that was produced and distributed by the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
A settlement was filed in bankruptcy court Tuesday that could provide $100 million as early as next year to victims of a nationwide meningitis outbreak linked to tainted steroid injections, lawyers said. New England Compounding Center, its owners, related companies and insurers reached the settlement with a steering committee representing patients across the country who received shots of medication found to be contaminated with fungus. The agreement, tentatively reached and announced in December, awaits approval in U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Massachusetts Eastern Division.
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HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The rapid decline in health and ultimate death of a woman from fungal meningitis at Johns Hopkins Hospital after she'd received a tainted steroid injection was outlined by a team of Hopkins doctors in a medical journal article released online Thursday. The article, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, says a 51-year-old woman arrived at a local emergency room at the end of August with a headache "radiating" from the back of her head to her face. She'd received the steroid injection a week earlier.
HEALTH
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
A Loyola University Maryland student has been diagnosed with possible bacterial meningitis and is in serious condition at local hospital, school officials said Thursday. Loyola spokesman Nick Alexopulos said the diagnosis is pending laboratory confirmation but said that there likely wasn't a significant health risk to its community. School health officials are evaluating the student's roommates and other close contacts, Alexopulos said. The last known case of meningitis on the Baltimore school's campus was last February, school officials said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 12, 2001
Christopher Taylor, the third-year University of Maryland medical student diagnosed last week with bacterial meningitis, was in fair condition last night at University of Maryland Medical Center, according to school officials. Although the Towson resident, 27, will need physical therapy and special care during his recovery, his doctors are optimistic. "Given the dramatic improvement he's made ... it would be fair to characterize his prognosis as encouraging," said Dr. Richard Colgan, who is overseeing Taylor's care.
NEWS
November 1, 2012
After reading the article in The Sun, "Report finds lax pharmacy oversight," (Oct. 30) I was prompted to write in. While Mitt Romney, the Republican candidate for president, argues for reducing the role of the federal government, particularly with respect to health care, 354 people have recently been sickened with meningitis and 25 others have died due to the lax oversight of the New England Compounding Center. The fact that the offending company is from Governor Romney's state of Massachusetts does not go unnoticed.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
A national outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to a tainted steroid killed two Marylanders. Nearly two dozen people living with the disease and hundreds of others who may have been exposed fear they may be next. Sheila Smelkinson began suffering in July from pain in her lower back and right leg that kept the Pikesville resident awake for all but a few hours each night. Cortisone shots, one in August and a second in September, relieved her discomfort - until she received a call informing her the medication was among batches contaminated with fungus in a Massachusetts pharmaceutical facility.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Orioles third baseman Manny Machado suffered from a bout of meningitis this offseason, but the organization's top young position player has recovered and is expected to be ready for spring training. Machado was hospitalized for a day and a half about a month ago, but he has since recovered. He resumed full workouts two weeks ago, and the Orioles consider the illness a non-issue. Orioles manager Buck Showalter told reporters about Machado's illness Tuesday afternoon during his media session at the winter meetings.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
State health officials are looking into two cases of meningitis, including one death, that may have been caused by spinal injections. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which announced the cases late Wednesday, would not release details about either victim. The cases are part of a widespread investigation across 26 states, where the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that five people have died. The outbreak was first identified when patients in a Tennessee ambulatory care clinic developed meningitis or stroke symptoms within a month of receiving an epidural spinal injection with the steroid methylprednisolone acetate, or Solumedrol.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
A Baltimore County pain treatment center is resisting involvement in a probe into the deadly national fungal meningitis outbreak linked to tainted steroids last year. Baltimore Pain Management Center, which received some doses of the recalled medications, filed an objection Tuesday in federal court to a subpoena it received last month. Lawyers are seeking documents from 76 clinics across the country, including seven in Maryland, that received the drugs as they build a case against New England Compounding Pharmacy Inc., the Massachusetts facility that produced them.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Seven Maryland health care centers that received tainted steroids linked to a nationwide meningitis outbreak will be required to turn over documents and give testimony under subpoenas filed last week in a federal lawsuit. A steering committee of lawyers representing patients who were given doses of the medication filed 76 of the subpoenas across the country. Patients in 22 states received injections of the steroids last year before they were recalled; 745 of them developed fungal meningitis or other health issues as a result, and 58 died.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
State health officials don't know how often Marylanders use medications mixed in facilities lacking safety oversight, like a Massachusetts facility linked to three deaths here, but a newly passed law could tell them — and help demonstrate a gap in federal regulation. Batches of sterile drugs from so-called compounding pharmacies will be subject to state review under the measure Gov. Martin O'Malley signed this month. And pharmacists and doctors who perform compounding, in which drugs are somehow altered from their Food and Drug Administration-approved form, will face an extra layer of permits and inspections for drugs used in Maryland.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - Around this time last year, Manny Machado spent his spring on a nomadic journey shuffling between the Orioles' minor league and major league camps. He wore No. 95. When he made appearances in the major league camp, he dressed in an auxiliary clubhouse isolated from the big league players. But after an early-August call-up from Double-A Bowie - a move that helped propel the Orioles to the playoffs - the 20-year-old Machado is entrenched in the clubhouse this spring.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
A national outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to a tainted steroid killed two Marylanders. Nearly two dozen people living with the disease and hundreds of others who may have been exposed fear they may be next. Sheila Smelkinson began suffering in July from pain in her lower back and right leg that kept the Pikesville resident awake for all but a few hours each night. Cortisone shots, one in August and a second in September, relieved her discomfort - until she received a call informing her the medication was among batches contaminated with fungus in a Massachusetts pharmaceutical facility.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
The pharmacy at the center of a fungal meningitis outbreak that has hit 19 states said Friday it has declared Chapter 11 bankruptcy in Massachusetts. The New England Compounding Center also said it plans to establish a fund to compensate those affected by the outbreak. The outbreak has sickened 620 people and killed 39. In Maryland, 25 people have gotten ill and two have died. The outbreak is linked to three lots of a steroid injection used to treat back pain that clinics and medical facilities bought from New England Compounding Center.
HEALTH
The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Anne Arundel County Public School officials said on Thursday the county Department of Health has not recommended additional cleaning steps to be taken amid the Tuesday death of a Glen Burnie High School junior, who had become ill the day before with symptoms associated with bacterial meningitis. School officials on Wednesday said that a letter was sent home to students' parents outlining the girl's death and providing information about bacterial meningitis. "The county Department of Health has not recommended any additional cleaning procedures for us outside of our normal daily cleaning procedures," said Anne Arundel schools spokesman Bob Mosier.
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