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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 25, 1991
Los Angeles--The quest. The campfire. Male bonding. The manly man. The masculine psyche.Such terms are not what we think of as the language of prime-time television. But we're going to be hearing them a lot this fall, as some of our favorite male characters in hit comedies and dramas explore what it means to be a man in the '90s.Craig T. Nelson, of "Coach," said Monday his character will be trying to get in touch with his feelings through the works of poet and best-selling author Robert Bly, often called the father of the "men's movement."
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By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
About 5,000 couples gathered at the Baltimore Arena yesterday to renew their marriage vows, participating in one of the latest Christian trends: the anti-divorce movement. The couples came for a one-day program called "I Still Do," designed to help couples rekindle the spark in their marriages. There were young couples not married yet, and elderly couples, married 50 years. There were contented couples, hoping to prevent problems, and discontented couples, trying to make things right again.
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By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 24, 1995
BOSTON -- Here are two vignettes from the new men's movement:A young convert back from a gathering of his brethren vows to be caring, engaged, responsible to his family and community. He promises to be the upright head of his household.A woman who stayed on the sidelines is asked by a television reporter what her role is in the future of this movement. She pledges, unself-consciously, to stand behind her men.Both these scenes came in the aftermath of the Million Man March. But they could just as easily have been culled from the annals of the Promise Keepers crusade.
FEATURES
By Cynthia Dockrell and Cynthia Dockrell,BOSTON GLOBE | December 7, 1997
I'm still trying to find a women's magazine worth reading. As usual, Ms. is the only one that comes close.Its tone is heavy-duty, to be sure, but somebody has to talk to women as if they were more than the sum of their beauty-tipped parts. Ms. has long understood that women care more about getting along with men than getting in bed with them; this month it asks the guys themselves if they've been getting the message.Michael Kimmel writes about the decidedly small proportion of men who don't simply pay lip service to feminism but actually participate in it. Virtually everybody these days believes in equal rights, Kimmel points out, but "Some men declare themselves feminists just a bit too effortlessly, especially if they think it's going to help them get a date."
NEWS
June 29, 1994
IN THE July issue of Reason, Cathy Young offers some provocative thoughts on feminism and masculism. Here are some excerpts:"Although masculism challenges the politically correct view of women as an oppressed class, it often shares some key elements of p.c.: the 'politics of identity,' which eclipse the notion of a universal human condition; an antipathy to such Western values as rationality, competitiveness, and individual achievement; the tendency to...
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | July 7, 1991
LIKE RANDY MILLIGAN, WHO GOES BY MOOSE IN THE ORIOLES locker room, and James Brown, the Godfather of Soul on stage, Robert Keller has a nickname all his own. Around the 15th floor of the Legg Mason building, he is referred to simply, and sometimes quite seriously, as Mr. Vision.He admits to this and lets out a hearty laugh, seemingly pleased with his image as a leader charting the business course of a city.It's a title some say Mr. Keller has earned. As president of the Greater Baltimore Committee, an organization representing 1,000 of the area's largest companies, he was responsible for recently unveiling an ambitious blueprint to make Baltimore the nation's leader in "life sciences."
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | June 25, 1995
Washington -- On another weekend in another season, these men hustling down the ramps at RFK Stadium would be scrambling to beat the parking lot jam or make last call for Budweiser. Tonight, there's no beer to be found. The men rise cold sober from their seats, rush to the field and step onto the red clay to bow their heads, cry, embrace, tell a story.They offer stories to their Lord Jesus. Some have been drunk. Some have been driven by pornography into sexual fantasy. Others have been deceitful or adulterous or blinded by ambition or absent from the lives of their wives and children.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | April 14, 1992
Pecs and paddles, rocks, blood, cars that go vrooooom! Gretzky, deep sea fishing and hot chili peppers. Bellowing a Robert Bly "Ho!" in your face, Men's Journal, a brainchild of Jann Wenner, founder of Rolling Stone and US magazines, premieres on the stands today.The magazine is a travelogue of extremes, a Hemingway-esque celebration of men bonding with men through nearly every athletic activity except rubbing two sticks together. It is also a high-tech extravaganza, touting the top of the line in sports gear.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | June 29, 1992
Father's Day came and went with little respect, honor or celebration for fatherhood's basic biological prerequisite -- being male.Maleness has been under relentless assault for a generation. Feminists first blew the bugle and still lead the attack. They accuse men of being violent, destructive, exploitative, competitive, abusive, domineering and misogynous. Some of them hold the male gender responsible for war and environmental degradation, as well as the oppression of women.This demonology of maleness contrasts with feminism's affirming vision of womanhood.
FEATURES
By Hartford Courant | August 29, 1991
"What Do Men Really Want?" Newsweek asked earlier this summer in its cover story on the burgeoning men's movement.Whether they want it or not, men are in store for more books telling them how to be men. One look at the non-fiction best-seller list reveals why: Robert Bly's "Iron John: A Book About Men" and Sam Keen's "Fire in the Belly: On Being a Man" are surprising fixtures. With their success, at least three more books about male bonding are due from publishers this fall.From men's weekends in the woods to TV sitcoms to books, the topic of men's finding the "inner warrior" or the "wild man" within is permeating the culture, even if it sometimes inspires skepticism.
FEATURES
By Trip Gabriel and Trip Gabriel,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 1996
NEW YORK -- There is not a deerskin-covered drum in sight. Nor any papier-mache animal masks to inspire visitors with their fierce primitive maleness.A half-dozen years after Robert Bly and his followers stomped into the light of the national campfire, urging "sensitive," "soft" males to get in touch with their inner wild man, it would seem the most visible legacy of the "men's movement" is the macho-lite persona of the television star Tim Allen on "Home Improvement."Bly, whose snow-white hair and best-selling book "Iron John" once made him an avuncular father figure to millions, was ensconced in a New York University residential high-rise, in boxy white rooms furnished like a graduate-student apartment.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 24, 1995
BOSTON -- Here are two vignettes from the new men's movement:A young convert back from a gathering of his brethren vows to be caring, engaged, responsible to his family and community. He promises to be the upright head of his household.A woman who stayed on the sidelines is asked by a television reporter what her role is in the future of this movement. She pledges, unself-consciously, to stand behind her men.Both these scenes came in the aftermath of the Million Man March. But they could just as easily have been culled from the annals of the Promise Keepers crusade.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | June 25, 1995
Washington -- On another weekend in another season, these men hustling down the ramps at RFK Stadium would be scrambling to beat the parking lot jam or make last call for Budweiser. Tonight, there's no beer to be found. The men rise cold sober from their seats, rush to the field and step onto the red clay to bow their heads, cry, embrace, tell a story.They offer stories to their Lord Jesus. Some have been drunk. Some have been driven by pornography into sexual fantasy. Others have been deceitful or adulterous or blinded by ambition or absent from the lives of their wives and children.
NEWS
June 29, 1994
IN THE July issue of Reason, Cathy Young offers some provocative thoughts on feminism and masculism. Here are some excerpts:"Although masculism challenges the politically correct view of women as an oppressed class, it often shares some key elements of p.c.: the 'politics of identity,' which eclipse the notion of a universal human condition; an antipathy to such Western values as rationality, competitiveness, and individual achievement; the tendency to...
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Staff Writer | April 12, 1993
For almost two hours, Michael Douglas' character in the movie "Falling Down" screams his rage and fury. His attitude of "I don't give a damn anymore" sums up the growing frustration among a segment of society that feels it is losing power. White males in America."There are a number of issues that men today, especially young men, are angry about," says Dr. Charles T. Lo Presto, 46, a clinical psychologist and assistant professor at Loyola College in Baltimore.By the year 2010, for example, white men "will be a distinct minority in the work force to people of color and women," says Dr. Lo Presto, quoting recent studies.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | June 29, 1992
Father's Day came and went with little respect, honor or celebration for fatherhood's basic biological prerequisite -- being male.Maleness has been under relentless assault for a generation. Feminists first blew the bugle and still lead the attack. They accuse men of being violent, destructive, exploitative, competitive, abusive, domineering and misogynous. Some of them hold the male gender responsible for war and environmental degradation, as well as the oppression of women.This demonology of maleness contrasts with feminism's affirming vision of womanhood.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
About 5,000 couples gathered at the Baltimore Arena yesterday to renew their marriage vows, participating in one of the latest Christian trends: the anti-divorce movement. The couples came for a one-day program called "I Still Do," designed to help couples rekindle the spark in their marriages. There were young couples not married yet, and elderly couples, married 50 years. There were contented couples, hoping to prevent problems, and discontented couples, trying to make things right again.
FEATURES
By Cynthia Dockrell and Cynthia Dockrell,BOSTON GLOBE | December 7, 1997
I'm still trying to find a women's magazine worth reading. As usual, Ms. is the only one that comes close.Its tone is heavy-duty, to be sure, but somebody has to talk to women as if they were more than the sum of their beauty-tipped parts. Ms. has long understood that women care more about getting along with men than getting in bed with them; this month it asks the guys themselves if they've been getting the message.Michael Kimmel writes about the decidedly small proportion of men who don't simply pay lip service to feminism but actually participate in it. Virtually everybody these days believes in equal rights, Kimmel points out, but "Some men declare themselves feminists just a bit too effortlessly, especially if they think it's going to help them get a date."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | April 14, 1992
Pecs and paddles, rocks, blood, cars that go vrooooom! Gretzky, deep sea fishing and hot chili peppers. Bellowing a Robert Bly "Ho!" in your face, Men's Journal, a brainchild of Jann Wenner, founder of Rolling Stone and US magazines, premieres on the stands today.The magazine is a travelogue of extremes, a Hemingway-esque celebration of men bonding with men through nearly every athletic activity except rubbing two sticks together. It is also a high-tech extravaganza, touting the top of the line in sports gear.
FEATURES
By Hartford Courant | August 29, 1991
"What Do Men Really Want?" Newsweek asked earlier this summer in its cover story on the burgeoning men's movement.Whether they want it or not, men are in store for more books telling them how to be men. One look at the non-fiction best-seller list reveals why: Robert Bly's "Iron John: A Book About Men" and Sam Keen's "Fire in the Belly: On Being a Man" are surprising fixtures. With their success, at least three more books about male bonding are due from publishers this fall.From men's weekends in the woods to TV sitcoms to books, the topic of men's finding the "inner warrior" or the "wild man" within is permeating the culture, even if it sometimes inspires skepticism.
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