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By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 9, 1993
NEW YORK -- Here sits the editor of a "major" men's magazine.He's rarely seen in suits. His sandy brown hair is disheveled instead of slicked back. And behind his desk is a Gene Simmons doll.James Truman heads Details magazine, the voice of a new generation. So don't try to sell this savvy British 34-year-old on traditional men's fashion -- or traditional men's fashion glossies, for that matter."In my experience, people in their 20s just don't buy the men's-magazines myth," he says with a sneer.
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By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2005
Start saying your goodbyes now, menfolk. The era of the T-shirt is dwindling. Oh, you can still wash the car in your T, mow the lawn in it, play a little basketball in it. But for most other casual events, the polo shirt has trumped your trusted T. That's right. The polo. You remember it from the 1980s preppy craze. Short-sleeved, two buttons. Tidy little collar. After seasons and seasons of T-shirts - rumpled, oversized or emblazoned with irreverent sayings - the polo has returned, taking men's fashion one step further into Grownupville.
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By Donna Larcen and Donna Larcen,The Hartford Courant | June 24, 1992
Menswear designers have discovered a truth that shoppers have known for years: People don't change their wardrobes overnight.So for fall and beyond, the savvy merchandisers are pushing men's styles with gentle nudges, allowing what has been fashionable to blend in, not look drastically out of style with what's new."But we still have to give men a reason to buy," says Tom Julian, fashion director of the Men's Fashion Association, which held its fall and winter preview recently in New York.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | May 13, 2001
The new face of men's fashion, some say, is soft, pudgy and just a tad lumpen. The eyes are beady, the lips are menacingly curled, the hairline has long crept past the halfway mark of the head. And the belly is recognizable for its unabashedly comfortable droop over the belt. Sure, these are highly unusual elements of a male icon in the fashion world, where those anointed for deification tend to possess the dimensions of an Adonis. But when you're Tony Soprano, a likable mob boss on one of the most popular shows on television -- well, the rules of fashion can be altered.
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By Taili Song and Taili Song,Dallas Morning News | October 16, 1991
For fall, men's fashion is revisiting the past. From the Peasant Boy to the Pilgrim Look, the Amish to the American Indian, old world is the new word in menswear.Reaping ideas from the American immigrants, the Dust Bowl and the Italian countryside, designers are pointing to humble origins instead of stuffy roots. Although their appeal is historical, these styles aren't about tradition, they're about nostalgia.Nostalgia involves more than just a look. It's romantic; it has a feel. To impart a sensibility of realness and substance to clothing, designers are relying heavily on texture.
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By Genevieve Buck and Genevieve Buck,Chicago Tribune | November 18, 1993
A Frenchman named Farid Chenoune has written a beautifully illustrated book called, quite simply, "A History of Men's Fashion." It begins with clothes worn in 1760 -- frock coats and snug breeches were big then -- and continues right up to the beginning of the '90s, ending with a section called "Pin Stripes and Black Leather."Mr. Chenoune's "History" is all about what men wore and, quite often, it goes into why they wore what they wore. It's about street fashion, meaning the clothes men have worn through the ages for business and traveling, for lounging, cycling, even FTC fencing (shirts, ties, no jackets, suspenders dangling around the hips)
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By T.J. Howard and T.J. Howard,Chicago Tribune | March 18, 1992
TC Menswear has the blues. Colorwise, that is.Granted, nautical themes surface every spring in men's sportswear, but this year blue moves far beyond conventional navy. From azure to zaffer, blue hues for 1992 surface everywhere from raincoats to neckties.Conservative businessmen and sailing jocks are not to worry; there still is plenty of navy to go around.Attracting the most attention right now, though, are royal blue, aqua and teal -- pigments with more personality. "In suits, the big word is 'petrol,' which is a brighter mid-blue.
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By Donna Larcen and Donna Larcen,The Hartford Courant | June 25, 1992
Menswear designers have discovered a truth that shoppers have known for years: People don't change their wardrobes overnight.So for fall and beyond, the savvy merchandisers are pushing men's styles with gentle nudges, allowing what has been fashionable to blend in, not look drastically out of style with what's new."But we still have to give men a reason to buy," says Tom Julian, fashion director of the Men's Fashion Association, which held its fall and winter preview recently in New York.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | May 13, 2001
The new face of men's fashion, some say, is soft, pudgy and just a tad lumpen. The eyes are beady, the lips are menacingly curled, the hairline has long crept past the halfway mark of the head. And the belly is recognizable for its unabashedly comfortable droop over the belt. Sure, these are highly unusual elements of a male icon in the fashion world, where those anointed for deification tend to possess the dimensions of an Adonis. But when you're Tony Soprano, a likable mob boss on one of the most popular shows on television -- well, the rules of fashion can be altered.
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By Kevin Cowherd | March 27, 1997
IT'S TIME (well past time, some would say) for this column to weigh in on the most alarming trend in this country today: the return of '70s chic.Walk into any high school and you'll see dozens of teen-age girls with long, straight hair wearing hip-hugging jeans and shirts with daisy prints and generally looking like Marianne Faithful: The Early Years.Women are wearing blue eye shadow, lip gloss, platform heels and shiny, tight fabrics for that off-duty stripper look popularized in the '70s.
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By Kevin Cowherd | March 27, 1997
IT'S TIME (well past time, some would say) for this column to weigh in on the most alarming trend in this country today: the return of '70s chic.Walk into any high school and you'll see dozens of teen-age girls with long, straight hair wearing hip-hugging jeans and shirts with daisy prints and generally looking like Marianne Faithful: The Early Years.Women are wearing blue eye shadow, lip gloss, platform heels and shiny, tight fabrics for that off-duty stripper look popularized in the '70s.
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By Amy M. Spindler and Amy M. Spindler,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 15, 1996
Men's fashion is on the kind of creative roll that used to be the norm for women's clothing design.While women's fashion has been incapable in the last two years of getting the momentum for anything resembling a movement, men's fashion is in the creative throes of one.Women's fashion most recently suggested that women of all ages dress like moms, yet men's fashion is throwing off daddy's clothes, stern suits with corporate pretentions and even soft, asexual...
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | August 15, 1994
Mike Royko is on vacation. In the meantime, we are reprinting some of his favorite columns. This column was first published Nov. 19, 1984. When my grandfather sat on the front steps wearing his long underwear tops and drinking beer, it never occurred to me that he was a fashion trendsetter.That was just the way he and his friends dressed. For more formal occasions, such as going to work or to Bruno's Corner Tap, they would slip a shirt and trousers over their long underwear.For leisure-time activities, such as lounging on the front steps, they would remove the shirt.
FEATURES
By Genevieve Buck and Genevieve Buck,Chicago Tribune | November 18, 1993
A Frenchman named Farid Chenoune has written a beautifully illustrated book called, quite simply, "A History of Men's Fashion." It begins with clothes worn in 1760 -- frock coats and snug breeches were big then -- and continues right up to the beginning of the '90s, ending with a section called "Pin Stripes and Black Leather."Mr. Chenoune's "History" is all about what men wore and, quite often, it goes into why they wore what they wore. It's about street fashion, meaning the clothes men have worn through the ages for business and traveling, for lounging, cycling, even FTC fencing (shirts, ties, no jackets, suspenders dangling around the hips)
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 9, 1993
NEW YORK -- Here sits the editor of a "major" men's magazine.He's rarely seen in suits. His sandy brown hair is disheveled instead of slicked back. And behind his desk is a Gene Simmons doll.James Truman heads Details magazine, the voice of a new generation. So don't try to sell this savvy British 34-year-old on traditional men's fashion -- or traditional men's fashion glossies, for that matter."In my experience, people in their 20s just don't buy the men's-magazines myth," he says with a sneer.
FEATURES
By Robin Updike and Robin Updike,Seattle Times | April 1, 1993
Men who aren't 25 anymore and aren't athletically built rock musicians should thank their lucky stars for President Clinton, a 46-long with a paunch who nevertheless is a new pinup for America's men's fashion industry.Though no one will ever confuse our husky president with a GQ model, the menswear industry is as giddy as a co-ed whose blind date arrives in a smart Italian suit. Compared with George Bush's preppy, passe pinstripes, the industry hopes that Mr. Clinton's taste for softer suits, bold ties and French cuffs will inspire male baby boomers to loosen up and dress with a -- more panache.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2005
Start saying your goodbyes now, menfolk. The era of the T-shirt is dwindling. Oh, you can still wash the car in your T, mow the lawn in it, play a little basketball in it. But for most other casual events, the polo shirt has trumped your trusted T. That's right. The polo. You remember it from the 1980s preppy craze. Short-sleeved, two buttons. Tidy little collar. After seasons and seasons of T-shirts - rumpled, oversized or emblazoned with irreverent sayings - the polo has returned, taking men's fashion one step further into Grownupville.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | August 15, 1994
Mike Royko is on vacation. In the meantime, we are reprinting some of his favorite columns. This column was first published Nov. 19, 1984. When my grandfather sat on the front steps wearing his long underwear tops and drinking beer, it never occurred to me that he was a fashion trendsetter.That was just the way he and his friends dressed. For more formal occasions, such as going to work or to Bruno's Corner Tap, they would slip a shirt and trousers over their long underwear.For leisure-time activities, such as lounging on the front steps, they would remove the shirt.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO FTC | March 19, 1993
It came as a pleasant surprise to learn that I am on the cutting edge of men's fashion.I discovered this after reading an article in the New York Times about a new magazine devoted to the kind of clothing worn by today's male.The story contained this capsule view of men's fashion trends by one Woody Hochswender, who is editor of the new magazine, which is called Esquire Gentleman.Mr. Hochswender said: "If you take an anthropological view of fashion today, it's all happening in men's fashion."
FEATURES
By Donna Larcen and Donna Larcen,The Hartford Courant | June 25, 1992
Menswear designers have discovered a truth that shoppers have known for years: People don't change their wardrobes overnight.So for fall and beyond, the savvy merchandisers are pushing men's styles with gentle nudges, allowing what has been fashionable to blend in, not look drastically out of style with what's new."But we still have to give men a reason to buy," says Tom Julian, fashion director of the Men's Fashion Association, which held its fall and winter preview recently in New York.
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