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NEWS
November 30, 2003
Charles Hamburger, owner and founder of the former Charles Men's Shops, died Friday of natural causes at North Oaks Retirement Community in Pikesville, where he resided for the past three years. The former Baltimore resident was 88. Mr. Hamburger was born and raised in Baltimore, and attended the University of Maryland. In 1940, he opened the Charles Men's Shop in Pimlico, and later opened a second store on Erdman Avenue. He ran both businesses until 1980, when he suffered a stroke. Throughout his four decades in the men's clothing industry, family members said, Mr. Hamburger prided himself in treating his customers with respect - working by the motto: "the customer is always right."
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BUSINESS
April 1, 2008
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. Shares fell $1.43, or 6.5 percent, to $20.50. Barron's said stock in the Hampstead-based maker of men's clothing could drop as low as $16 a share on slow sales growth and building inventory.
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NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | June 30, 1992
LADIES, this is a Glimpses largely for men. (You're welcome to read on, but you might want to read the other articles on this page and come back next Tuesday.) This newspaper recently has reported on the financial problems of the parent company of Hamburgers, the 142-year-old men's (and later, women's, too) clothing retailer. According to the reports, Hamburgers may have to close some of its stores and/or sell off some others. Whatever, the news serves as an afterword to the chapter in the city's history that covers the life and slow death of its men's clothing businesses.
NEWS
September 25, 2005
On September 18, 2005, KATHERINE R. SCHACKERT, 94, of Venice, FL., formerly of Baltimore. She was a clothing examiner for L. Grief & Bros. Men's clothing in Baltimore, retiring after more than 30 years. Survivors include many nieces and nephews, including Rosalie Lankford of Venice and cousins also survive. Services and interment were in Florida
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times | August 28, 1991
There was plenty of men's clothing on the fashion runways last week, but the real news was the attention on the chest, where bulging pectorals are in style.Many of the models looked as if they had their breasts augmented, although the look was probably accomplished at the gym. Male models typically shave their chests before fashion shows, highlighting the area.There is something strange in the spectacle of young stubbly-cheeked men with ultra-smooth chests strolling down a runway, absent-mindedly lip-synching the Doobie Brothers' "What a Fool Believes."
FEATURES
By CATHERINE COOK | January 12, 1992
Fashion for fashion's sake is no longer chic in the world of men's clothing. In the no-frills '90s, designers are stressing words like comfort, value and versatility.Multifunctional items like the jacket pictured here are on the increase. A stylish twist on the classic navy blazer, it can be dressed up with tie and formal slacks or dressed down with sweater and blue jeans.@
NEWS
December 12, 1996
Police logOld Mill: Someone broke into a second-floor apartment in the 600 block of Milldam Court between 7 a.m and 7 p.m. Tuesday, ransacked it and stole 150 compact discs, $250, credit cards, a portable compact disc player, and $100 worth of men's clothing that had been gift-wrapped for Christmas.Pub Date: 12/12/96
NEWS
By Kevin Harrison and Kevin Harrison,Contributing Writer | December 30, 1993
If the thrift shop Katherine Smith opened in September succeeds in its mission of raising money for the Cancer Resource and Support Center she founded four years ago, she knows she'll have plenty of people to thank.From business computer printers to housewares, exercise equipment and stereos to clothing and books, the shop is geared to consumers with an eye for bargains.Dozens of individuals, groups and businesses have helped get the shop off the ground, through a mass of donations that, Ms. Smith says, "just blow my mind."
BUSINESS
April 1, 2008
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. Shares fell $1.43, or 6.5 percent, to $20.50. Barron's said stock in the Hampstead-based maker of men's clothing could drop as low as $16 a share on slow sales growth and building inventory.
FEATURES
By Genevieve Buck and Genevieve Buck,Chicago Tribune | November 18, 1993
A Frenchman named Farid Chenoune has written a beautifully illustrated book called, quite simply, "A History of Men's Fashion." It begins with clothes worn in 1760 -- frock coats and snug breeches were big then -- and continues right up to the beginning of the '90s, ending with a section called "Pin Stripes and Black Leather."Mr. Chenoune's "History" is all about what men wore and, quite often, it goes into why they wore what they wore. It's about street fashion, meaning the clothes men have worn through the ages for business and traveling, for lounging, cycling, even FTC fencing (shirts, ties, no jackets, suspenders dangling around the hips)
NEWS
November 30, 2003
Charles Hamburger, owner and founder of the former Charles Men's Shops, died Friday of natural causes at North Oaks Retirement Community in Pikesville, where he resided for the past three years. The former Baltimore resident was 88. Mr. Hamburger was born and raised in Baltimore, and attended the University of Maryland. In 1940, he opened the Charles Men's Shop in Pimlico, and later opened a second store on Erdman Avenue. He ran both businesses until 1980, when he suffered a stroke. Throughout his four decades in the men's clothing industry, family members said, Mr. Hamburger prided himself in treating his customers with respect - working by the motto: "the customer is always right."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 30, 2002
SURE, MAYBE you wouldn't know it to look at me, but I read the fashion magazines and am thoroughly up on the latest styles for men, at least the styles worn by the brooding 20-somethings with gelled hair who slouch against grimy subway walls in all the ads for Calvin Klein, Nautica, Evan Picone, etc. This fall, the "look" for men is said to be dressier, less informal than in past years. Gone, apparently, are the days when you could throw on a golf shirt and khakis for that Rotarian of the Year dinner, or slip into a satin warm-up suit favored by the likes of Al Sharpton and Eminem to meet the Queen Mother.
BUSINESS
By Liz Steinberg and Liz Steinberg,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. said yesterday that same-store sales rose 8 percent in April, the third month in a row the Hampstead company has seen a month-over-month increase after the soft winter retail market. Jos. A. Bank also announced its total sales increased 18.2 percent in April over 2001, well above the industry average. The men's clothing chain's April sales totaled $20.1 million, up from $17 million last year. "Due the fact that they had negative same-store sales four months ago ... that's a pretty good sign," said Preston E. Silvey, a First Dallas Securities financial analyst who follows the men's clothing chain.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
Vernon McFadden has always loved clothes. Not just to wear, but to create. Trained as a tailor at Carver Vo-Tech Senior High, McFadden, now 40, used to make all of his own clothing. "I wanted to be different," he says. "I didn't want to look like somebody off the rack."As a work-study student, he also did alterations at Pop Kelley's, a men's clothing store on Pennsylvania Avenue. And when he wasn't sewing, McFadden was singing in a rhythm and blues band called 21st Century. But these days, McFadden has his hands full with Vernon's Menswear, his own clothing store in Security Square Mall, where anyone searching for an orange sports jacket and the shoes to match will not be disappointed.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1998
Philip Kahn Jr. wove the threads of family, Baltimore's Jewish community and the city's once-flourishing garment industry into the tapestry of his life.An author, historian, painter, collector and retired men's clothing company executive, Mr. Kahn died of cancer Friday at Sinai Hospital. He was 80."He had one of the most meaningful retirements of anyone I know," said William T. Conklin III, a friend for 25 years. "He was so fulfilled, so interested. He was a quintessential Baltimorean."A scholarly man so interested in the city and its history that he would rather drive through its streets than circle Baltimore on the Beltway, Mr. Kahn stitched his interests in the clothing industry and the city's Jewish community into two books.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
First, Loehmann's let men into the Back Room.Now, it's going to try to sell them clothes.Loehmann's, an institution in women's discount shopping, is opening a men's department today in 19 locations nationwide, including Timonium.The struggling retail chain, founded 75 years ago by Frieda Loehmann in an automobile showroom in Brooklyn, N.Y., was famous for its Back Room, where women undressed to try on designer clothes. Meanwhile, men sat outside on benches waiting for their wives.When Loehmann's renovated and nearly doubled the store size in Timonium in May, the Back Room was separated from the communal dressing room and became a department in the store.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Timothy J. Mullaney and Alec Matthew Klein and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc. finally pulled the trigger yesterday on the long-speculated closing of its Hampstead sewing factory, a decision that the retailer said will create "substantial savings" but eliminate about 100 workers from the payroll.The 35,000-square-foot factory, which manufactures suit jackets and sports coats, will close in early February and may be sold or put to some other use.Already, 28 employees have been transferred to the company's tailoring division. The other workers will receive what was described as standard severance packages.
NEWS
September 25, 2005
On September 18, 2005, KATHERINE R. SCHACKERT, 94, of Venice, FL., formerly of Baltimore. She was a clothing examiner for L. Grief & Bros. Men's clothing in Baltimore, retiring after more than 30 years. Survivors include many nieces and nephews, including Rosalie Lankford of Venice and cousins also survive. Services and interment were in Florida
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | September 16, 1997
STORIES TELL YOU what we used to be and how we are becoming something else. Here are some of those stories.Baltimore used to be a city famous for a large ''smokestack'' work force. It was common, into the third generation, for men in the city's Highlandtown-Canton neighborhoods to say, ''I work at the Point.'' That meant Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant.At its peak, during World War II, ''the Point'' employed more than 20,000. During those years, even more worked at the Glenn L. Martin aircraft-building plant, which was then the state's largest employer.
NEWS
By Kevin Cowherd | February 20, 1997
You got to know the rules before you break 'em. Otherwise it's no fun.-- "Sonny" Crockett in "Miami Vice" Once upon a time, men with class knew the rules about how to dress.You wore a gray or dark blue suit to the office. You wore a gray suit to weddings. You wore a dark blue suit to funerals.If you were just hacking around the house, you wore a sweater and khaki pants, unless you were Ward Cleaver, in which case you wore a white shirt and dark tie even if you were digging up a sewer line, or unless you were Ricky Ricardo, who always seemed to be lounging in a silk bathrobe, even if his next move was bringing snow tires up from the basement.
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