Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMen In Black
IN THE NEWS

Men In Black

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 10, 2009
The rare film to effectively combine humor and whiz-bang special effects (CGI and big budgets usually don't do funny well), Barry Sonnenfeld's 1997 Men in Black (7 p.m., TBS, repeats 9 p.m.) features the unlikely team of Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones as members of a super-secret government organization charged with keeping track of all the aliens among us. And by aliens, we mean real aliens, extraterrestrial beings with multiple heads, grotesque bodies (at least by our standards; I'm sure they're regarded as quite handsome on their home planets)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 10, 2009
The rare film to effectively combine humor and whiz-bang special effects (CGI and big budgets usually don't do funny well), Barry Sonnenfeld's 1997 Men in Black (7 p.m., TBS, repeats 9 p.m.) features the unlikely team of Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones as members of a super-secret government organization charged with keeping track of all the aliens among us. And by aliens, we mean real aliens, extraterrestrial beings with multiple heads, grotesque bodies (at least by our standards; I'm sure they're regarded as quite handsome on their home planets)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1997
In "Men in Black," immigrants are storming the border, and it ain't the Rio Grande.This will come as no surprise to Roswell conspiracists, but aliens of the outer space variety are living on Earth. Most are in New York City. Many drive cabs.As Tommy Lee Jones, one of the quasi-official Men in Black who monitor this "immigrant" activity, explains to a young recruit played by Will Smith, Earth is a popular refuge for those without a planet. "Ever see 'Casablanca'?" he asks. "Same thing, no Nazis."
NEWS
August 11, 2005
Judith Rossner, 70, who in Looking for Mr. Goodbar and other novels relentlessly analyzed educated women amid the fear and freedom of social and sexual revolutions, died Tuesday at a New York hospital. She had been ill with diabetes and leukemia. Mr. Goodbar, which came out in 1975, was probably her bestknown work, thanks to the 1977 movie that starred Diane Keaton as the Roman Catholic schoolteacher in New York City who frequents singles bars, with fatal results. Her many novels also include To the Precipice, His Little Women and August.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff | February 1, 2000
By day they wear Roman collars, pray in chapel and study the tomes of Thomas Aquinas. By night they don black tank tops and shorts, take to the court and study the works of Michael Jordan. They are the Men in Black, seminarians who play hoops for Jesus. About a dozen men studying for the priesthood for the Archdiocese of Baltimore formed the basketball team nearly three years ago as a way to attract more men to the priesthood. Their mission is to travel to parishes and show people, particularly young men, that they are just regular guys, in hopes that some will follow in their footsteps.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 3, 2002
SUN SCORE ** 1/2 Men in Black II gets some credit because, in an era when blockbusters come "super-sized," like fast food, its director, Barry Sonnenfeld, has continued to downsize. The most refreshing thing about the original Men in Black was that it was relatively small - a modest, slapdash, 98-minute special-effects farce. The most refreshing thing about Men in Black II is that it is 10 minutes shorter. Of course, it's often true that less is more. But in these films less is less, because Sonnenfeld fails to make the most of his concept and his characters.
NEWS
September 15, 1991
A Baltimore County motorist reported she was raped early yesterday after her car was pulled over on Rossville Boulevard near Gum Spring Road in the Rosedale area by two men in black uniforms she believed to be police officers.The woman, 28, told police she was on her way to work at 5:40 a.m. when she saw the red and blue light of a white police cruiser behind her and stopped.One of the men ordered her out of her car, marched her into woods and raped her, she said.The woman walked to her home, called police and was examined at a hospital, county police said she told them.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1999
The call goes out late Thursday morning along the echoing corridors of cellblock B at the city detention center -- "Lock in, gentlemen!" -- and a grumbling parade of inmates heads toward two rows of gloomy, narrow cells. Heavy doors begin shutting with clanks and thuds.Then, from around the corner come the Men in Black -- five beefy guys, silent and expressionless, decked from head to toe in black, belted uniforms, with pants tucked into polished boots. Soon, their five sets of gloved hands are poking and probing for whatever drugs or weapons this latest unannounced search can turn up.Such work is the centerpiece of a new strategy yielding dramatic results for LaMont W. Flanagan, who oversees the city jail and its 4,000 inmates as commissioner of pretrial detention and services.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre | April 16, 1995
"Men in Black," by Scott Spencer. 321 pages. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. $24Sam Holland aspires to be a serious novelist, but he writes junk for money. His latest, "Visitors from Above," a potboiler about UFOs, has touched off a freakish enthusiasm among readers and is about to make him rich.Wealth and fame come awkwardly. Holland is ashamed of the book, which he wrote under the pseudonym John Retcliffe. Tensions with his wife, Olivia, have tipped him into an affair of some months with a woman he met while writing the UFO book.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 19, 1997
Do you know anyone who has bought compact disc recordings of singer Foxy Brown or the soundtrack of "Men in Black" on the street since Wednesday?Baltimore County police said yesterday that such information could be valuable in tracking down a suspected serial robber and rapist whose loot in a music store holdup included 15 Foxy Brown CDs and nine copies of the movie soundtrack.It also could prove valuable to anyone providing a lead, since a $2,000 reward has been offered.The gunman who held up a Woodlawn music store also forced three people in the store to undress and two of them to perform a sex act.Police believe the same man robbed and raped a clerk at a Catonsville business Thursday and may be the one who twice robbed a clothing store in Security Square Mall -- on Dec. 22 and July 4, each time forcing people in the store to disrobe down to their underwear.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
NFL Defensive Player of the Year. Super Bowl Most Valuable Player. Fashion designer. Ray Lewis' Hall of Fame resume got a little more colorful yesterday when the Ravens unveiled a new all-black uniform that will be worn once this season. The All-Pro linebacker suggested the idea to owner Steve Bisciotti during a practice last year and played a role in the final look of the uniform. The Ravens will debut the dark jerseys and pants at their Nov. 7 nationally televised home game against the Cleveland Browns.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 19, 2002
YORK, Pa. - Two white men convicted in the 1969 race-riot killing of a black preacher's daughter were sentenced yesterday to spend at least 4 1/2 and 9 years in prison. York County Judge John C. Uhler handed down the sentences - 4 1/2 years to 10 years for Gregory H. Neff and 9 years to 19 years for Robert N. Messersmith - at the end of an emotional court hearing in which Messersmith leveled new accusations against former York Mayor Charlie Robertson. The former mayor was acquitted in October of charges that as a police officer he offered encouragement and bullets to the white gang members who killed Lillie Belle Allen.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 3, 2002
SUN SCORE ** 1/2 Men in Black II gets some credit because, in an era when blockbusters come "super-sized," like fast food, its director, Barry Sonnenfeld, has continued to downsize. The most refreshing thing about the original Men in Black was that it was relatively small - a modest, slapdash, 98-minute special-effects farce. The most refreshing thing about Men in Black II is that it is 10 minutes shorter. Of course, it's often true that less is more. But in these films less is less, because Sonnenfeld fails to make the most of his concept and his characters.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2001
Those two ominous looking men appearing on billboards around the state are part of the ad campaign launching the state's 61-day tax amnesty, which begins Sept. 1. The teaser billboards and signs on the backs of buses began late last week, and the full television, print and radio campaign gets under way Sept. 3. Except for the word "amnesty," the teaser ads say nothing about the state program to allow people to pay back taxes and interest, without penalties. The state expects the amnesty to raise $70 million, most of it earmarked for health and education.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff | February 1, 2000
By day they wear Roman collars, pray in chapel and study the tomes of Thomas Aquinas. By night they don black tank tops and shorts, take to the court and study the works of Michael Jordan. They are the Men in Black, seminarians who play hoops for Jesus. About a dozen men studying for the priesthood for the Archdiocese of Baltimore formed the basketball team nearly three years ago as a way to attract more men to the priesthood. Their mission is to travel to parishes and show people, particularly young men, that they are just regular guys, in hopes that some will follow in their footsteps.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1999
The call goes out late Thursday morning along the echoing corridors of cellblock B at the city detention center -- "Lock in, gentlemen!" -- and a grumbling parade of inmates heads toward two rows of gloomy, narrow cells. Heavy doors begin shutting with clanks and thuds.Then, from around the corner come the Men in Black -- five beefy guys, silent and expressionless, decked from head to toe in black, belted uniforms, with pants tucked into polished boots. Soon, their five sets of gloved hands are poking and probing for whatever drugs or weapons this latest unannounced search can turn up.Such work is the centerpiece of a new strategy yielding dramatic results for LaMont W. Flanagan, who oversees the city jail and its 4,000 inmates as commissioner of pretrial detention and services.
NEWS
August 11, 2005
Judith Rossner, 70, who in Looking for Mr. Goodbar and other novels relentlessly analyzed educated women amid the fear and freedom of social and sexual revolutions, died Tuesday at a New York hospital. She had been ill with diabetes and leukemia. Mr. Goodbar, which came out in 1975, was probably her bestknown work, thanks to the 1977 movie that starred Diane Keaton as the Roman Catholic schoolteacher in New York City who frequents singles bars, with fatal results. Her many novels also include To the Precipice, His Little Women and August.
FEATURES
By Sid Smith and Sid Smith,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 10, 1997
The image is among the more indelible from film Wunderkind Quentin Tarantino: an imposing row of guys, bedecked in black suits and shades, methodically marching toward the camera -- a menacing gaggle of human crows.Later, we discover that the hoods in the 1992 movie "Reservoir Dogs" have been given anonymous names based on colors. Mr. Pink asks Joe, the man in charge, "Why can't we pick out our own color?"Joe replies: "I tried that once, it don't work. You get four guys fighting over who's gonna be Mr. Black."
NEWS
By Paul Delaney | October 25, 1998
A REPORTER at the New York Times once called Imiri Baraka, when the black poet and writer was still known as Leroi Jones, to ask if he would comment on some black anniversary, perhaps of the Newark riots, the reporter was working on.Mr. Baraka refused, instead, barking insults into the phone about the New York Times' celebrating its own Negro week.Occasionally, pop culture turns its attention to African Americans in a serious way, though sometimes leaving the impression of living out Mr. Baraka's asperity.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 19, 1997
Do you know anyone who has bought compact disc recordings of singer Foxy Brown or the soundtrack of "Men in Black" on the street since Wednesday?Baltimore County police said yesterday that such information could be valuable in tracking down a suspected serial robber and rapist whose loot in a music store holdup included 15 Foxy Brown CDs and nine copies of the movie soundtrack.It also could prove valuable to anyone providing a lead, since a $2,000 reward has been offered.The gunman who held up a Woodlawn music store also forced three people in the store to undress and two of them to perform a sex act.Police believe the same man robbed and raped a clerk at a Catonsville business Thursday and may be the one who twice robbed a clothing store in Security Square Mall -- on Dec. 22 and July 4, each time forcing people in the store to disrobe down to their underwear.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.