Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMemory Loss
IN THE NEWS

Memory Loss

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 2, 2012
A drug commonly used by patients with HIV may be damaging nerve cells and causing memory loss, Johns Hopkins researchers have found. Doctors have long thought the brain damage and memory loss longterm survivors of HIV suffer was caused by the disease. Johns Hopkins scientists now believe a large cause is the anti-retroviral drug efavirenz, which attacks and damages brain cells. Efavirenz is one of the drugs patients with HIV use to suppress the disease. The researchers believe a minor change in the drug's structure may be able to block its toxic effects and still allow it to suppress the virus.  Norman J. Haughey, Ph.D., lead researcher and an associate professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , said in a release that the research is further evidence of the health problems drugs to treat HIV can cause.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | August 9, 2014
Retired U.S. Navy Lt. Brad Snyder of Baltimore won his fourth title of the Pan Pacific Para-Swimming Championships in Pasadena, Calif., winning the men's 100-meter freestyle S11 on Friday, the third day of competition at the Rose Bowl Aquatics Center. But the two-time 2012 Paralympic gold medalist, competing at a major international event for the first time since the Paralympic Games, later suffered his first defeat in the meet at the hands Japan's Keiichi Kimura and U.S. teammate Tharon Drake (Hobbs, N.M.)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Here's a no-brainer for you: Your memory doesn't have to get worse with age. In fact, you can actually grow the short-term memory portion of your brain -- and possibly even stave off the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Or so says Dr. Majid Fotuhi, a Harvard- and Johns Hopkins-trained neurologist who has operated a brain center in Lutherville for the past two and a half years, and who this winter opened an even larger brain center in Columbia, a 6,000-square-foot facility on Charter Drive, behind Howard County General Hospital.
SPORTS
By Nelson Coffin, For The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
Rather than allowing the bitter taste of a 14-6 loss to Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference rival Severn flavor the rest of its season, No. 9 St. Mary's took decisive action immediately after bowing to the No. 7 Admirals on Friday night. The plan was simple enough in theory, just not as easy to implement in reality, considering the Saints had a date with neighboring Broadneck the following morning in Cape St. Claire. In essence, what St. Mary's coach Kate Hickman was asking from her team was to develop collective short-term memory loss as quickly as possible.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Adults who lose their hearing later in life also are more likely to have a hard time concentrating on a book or remembering a simple conversation, Johns Hopkins research has found. The same brain functions that affect hearing also may cause problems with memory and other cognitive function, according to the study, published this month in JAMA Internal Medicine. It is the latest to support a link between hearing loss and decline of memory. The Hopkins researchers said that many people view hearing loss as an inconvenience of old age but that it may also contribute to more serious health problems.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | November 11, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- A highly touted but still controversial drug called tacrine can partially reverse memory loss and reduce dementia in some patients with early stages of Alzheimer's disease, a new study has found.The study results reported yesterday in the Journal of the American Medical Association are the strongest yet to suggest that drugs can ease the ill effects of Alzheimer's, which afflicts at least 2.5 million Americans and perhaps as many as 4 million, most over the age of 65.More than half of patients who received the highest doses of tacrine in a trial at 23 medical centers showed improvement in their short-term memory, use of language and ability to carry out simple tasks, according to the study.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 11, 2005
CHICAGO -- Eating fish once a week slows the memory loss associated with aging by 10 percent a year, according to a Rush University Medical Center study of 6,158 elderly Chicago residents. For people who eat more than one fish meal a week, the slowdown in memory loss amounted to 13 percent a year, Rush epidemiologist Martha Clare Morris reported yesterday in the online version of the medical journal Archives of Neurology. Analyses of diet, lifestyle and cognitive function found that after six years, those who consumed fish weekly were three to four years younger mentally than those who seldom ate fish, she said.
FEATURES
By Barbara McGarry Peters and Barbara McGarry Peters,Contributing Writer | August 3, 1993
Some memory loss is normal and natural. But some people, when they notice a slight memory lapse, fear they have Alzheimer's disease."The chance of developing this disease is small," says psychologist Thomas Crook, president of Memory Assessment Clinics Inc. He calls Alzheimer's "exaggerated aging. There is a quantitative difference."According to psychiatrist Trey Sunderland, chief, geriatric psychiatry at National Institute of Mental Health, people most at risk for this severe dementia are those with several family members who got the disease in their 70s or those with one close relative who got an aggressive form in his or her 50s.Symptoms of this disease can include an abrupt decline in memory, accompanied by the inability to express oneself verbally, by verbal repetition and by noticeable personality changes -- tearfulness, sadness, physical fighting with caretakers, wandering or delusions.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 16, 1993
Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, have discovered what they believe to be the mechanism of memory loss in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. The finding potentially opens the door to the development of new drugs that can halt memory deterioration in such disorders.The discovery, reported today in the journal Science, may also lead to a new understanding of the growth and death of cells during the development of the brain early in life.Dr. Dale E. Bredesen, a UCLA gerontologist, and his colleagues have found that a protein on the surface of key memory cells kills the cells unless a brain hormone called nerve growth factor, or NGF, is bound to, or locked onto, that protein.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 5, 2000
Don't forget: There are many ways to fight against memory loss Q. My husband's memory has been getting hazy, and I am concerned. He was tested by a neurologist who found that his vitamin B12 level was low. Shots were recommended, but that was difficult for us, and our internist suggested Nascobal nose drops as an alternative. We've had some trouble with this product. To my way of thinking, the dropper is hard to use. Is there any other way for him to get this vitamin? A. Vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to neurological symptoms such as moodiness, difficulty concentrating, memory loss, unsteadiness, numbness and tingling in hands and feet.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Here's a no-brainer for you: Your memory doesn't have to get worse with age. In fact, you can actually grow the short-term memory portion of your brain -- and possibly even stave off the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Or so says Dr. Majid Fotuhi, a Harvard- and Johns Hopkins-trained neurologist who has operated a brain center in Lutherville for the past two and a half years, and who this winter opened an even larger brain center in Columbia, a 6,000-square-foot facility on Charter Drive, behind Howard County General Hospital.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
A workshop last week at Howard Community College focused on self-advocacy — a means of enabling people, particularly those with developmental disabilities, to speak up and communicate their needs. Facilitator Ann Kukulies offered a few real-life scenarios that, she said, can make speaking up uncomfortable for anyone. "You are in a movie theater, and the person behind you is kicking the back of your seat," said Kukulies, career assistant for Counseling and Career Services at HCC. "You are pretty sure that he is not doing it on purpose, but it is very annoying.
NEWS
January 2, 2014
Holiday lights Sunday, Jan. 5 is the final day for the 20th annual Symphony of Lights, a 20-minute drive through more than 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays, at Symphony Woods in Columbia. Hours are 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Admission is $20 per car or van, up to eight passengers; $45 for commercial vans and minibuses seating nine to 24 people; and $125 for buses exceeding 24 passengers. Information: 410-740-7666 or hcgh.org/symphonyoflights. Event benefits Howard County General Hospital.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Linda Kellar seemed too young for dementia, the slow-forming disease that erodes the memories of people usually much older than the then-54-year-old housewife. But in 2009 that's what doctors found to be the cause of Kellar's severe agitation, memory loss, sleepless nights, babbling and hallucinations. Kellar now spends her days at Keswick Multi-Care Center under constant care because of the disease, which has progressed steadily since the diagnosis. Her husband, Arnold, knows that dementia will eventually take his wife's life.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Adults who lose their hearing later in life also are more likely to have a hard time concentrating on a book or remembering a simple conversation, Johns Hopkins research has found. The same brain functions that affect hearing also may cause problems with memory and other cognitive function, according to the study, published this month in JAMA Internal Medicine. It is the latest to support a link between hearing loss and decline of memory. The Hopkins researchers said that many people view hearing loss as an inconvenience of old age but that it may also contribute to more serious health problems.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Don't misunderstand. Barry Krauss loved Baltimore - from the crabcakes to the Inner Harbor to the rich provenance of the NFL team that picked him sixth overall in the 1979 draft. But five years later, the Colts' move to Indianapolis proved a godsend for the players, said Krauss, a tough linebacker who played 10 seasons with a horseshoe on his helmet. "It wasn't fair to Baltimore fans, to lose the franchise, with all that great history," he said. "But the relationship between the team and the community was so broken, so sad. It was tough, playing before 35,000" at Memorial Stadium.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | May 26, 2011
I constantly forget where I put my keys and my glasses. And I bet you do, too. I can't remember what groceries I need unless I write them down, and I tend to forget by the time I find a pen and a piece of paper. I can't remember where I was going when I decided to get up out of my chair. I can't remember whether I sent that email or only thought about sending that email. I can't remember my passwords, so I write them down. Thank heaven for speed-dial because I can't remember telephone numbers anymore.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Caitlin Francke and Jonathan Bor and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer D. Quentin Wilber contributed to this article | August 31, 1997
A distinctive pattern of memory loss was the thread that enabled a medical team to establish for the first time a probable connection between human illnesses and the microorganism that has been killing fish by the thousands.Doctors who investigated reports of ailments among people who worked on the Pocomoke River said yesterday that they had been skeptical of finding a link between the complaints and Pfiesteria piscicida.But after subjecting 13 people to hours of physical and psychological testing, doctors were startled to find that most had trouble remembering simple details of everyday life: errands, groceries, phone numbers, tasks just completed.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.