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NEWS
September 15, 2010
Primary election results were painfully slow last night and this morning in Baltimore County and Baltimore City, for a variety of reasons. In Baltimore County, fewer than 90 percent of election precincts had delivered results to the county election board on Wednesday morning. One of the main culprits: some election judges left the memory cards inside the electronic voting machines at the end of the day, rather than removing them and transmitting their contents. Jeffery Stevens, an information technology manager with the county elections board, told the Sun's Yeganeh June Torbati that all precincts are expected to be updated by the end of the business day.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Army investigators found nearly half a million field reports from Iraq and Afghanistan on a computer memory card among the belongings of Pfc. Bradley Manning, with a note suggesting that an unnamed recipient "sit on this information" while deciding how best to distribute it, according to testimony Monday. The note called the reports "possibly one of the more significant documents of our time" and said they would remove "the fog of war" and reveal "the true nature of 21st century asymmetric warfare," Army special agent David Shaver told the officer leading a preliminary hearing at Fort Meade.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Scott and Andy Scott,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 16, 2003
Think of memory cards as the film for digital cameras. Cards are where your images are stored. At The Dallas Morning News, we've bought hundreds and hundreds of cards in the past few years and have learned what works well - and what doesn't. Let's focus on CompactFlash cards and what to look for when buying them. While CompactFlash cards are the most common type of digital medium, some digital cameras take other media, such as Memory Stick and Smart- Media. Most of what follows will apply to these types of cards as well.
NEWS
September 15, 2010
Primary election results were painfully slow last night and this morning in Baltimore County and Baltimore City, for a variety of reasons. In Baltimore County, fewer than 90 percent of election precincts had delivered results to the county election board on Wednesday morning. One of the main culprits: some election judges left the memory cards inside the electronic voting machines at the end of the day, rather than removing them and transmitting their contents. Jeffery Stevens, an information technology manager with the county elections board, told the Sun's Yeganeh June Torbati that all precincts are expected to be updated by the end of the business day.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1999
Inexpensive alternative to the PalmPilot RoughHandspring's PalmPilot clone, the Visor, has created a monster buzz online and a shipping backlog for the new company. The Visor is not just any Palm clone, but one created by the original architects of the popular personal digital assistant (PDA). They wanted to create a PDA that used the highly regarded Palm operating system, was easily expandable through plug-in expansion cards and was cheaper than Palm Computing's products.The basic Visor sells for $179, has 2 megabytes of RAM and comes in one color -- graphite.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 11, 2003
When my wife and I took a fly-and-drive vacation to the Pacific Northwest last year, I had no problem figuring out what to do with the photos from my digital camera. I packed a laptop PC and dumped my camera's memory card to the hard drive when it was full. From our hotel rooms, I could transfer the best shots to a photo-sharing service to make sure they wouldn't get lost or ruined by an electronic glitch or airport security systems. The only heavy-duty laptop lugging involved getting the computer from the airport to our car on both ends.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | September 17, 2006
Anne Arundel County's elections director blamed a shortage of poll workers for a mishap last week that left thousands of primary votes missing and uncounted on election night, and said she worries that a lack of volunteers and inadequate training with electronic voting machines could "overload" the county's vote-counting system in November. Candidates for several offices, including those in the hotly contested Republican primary for county executive, had to wait until the day after the primary to find out who won, as election officials sorted out what happened to several missing electronic memory cards that stored votes.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Frustrated candidates and voters waited hours for results in this week's closest primaries, but elections officials insisted that delays and minor glitches were customary and that the state's voting system worked smoothly. While Marylanders may want electronic machines to spit out instantaneous numbers when polls close, elections officials say the reality of counting is more cumbersome, with room for error. The lag for results in Baltimore City and Baltimore County stemmed from missteps by poll workers and judges, as well as computer software glitches in some places.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 4, 2003
If you're looking at digital cameras this holiday season, you have plenty of company. Digital cameras are better and easier to use than ever. And this year, you can buy one that produces close-to-film quality without breaking the budget. I noticed the change this summer on a trip to Italy, where at least a third of the tourists I saw were snapping digital photos. According to the U.S. Photo Marketing Association, the number of rolls of film processed by photofinishers here has been declining since 2000, and the organization expects digital cameras to outsell film cameras for the first time this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Harner and Lauren Harner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2004
In the world of computer memory, the floppy disk has officially reached brontosaurus status. In other words, it's ancient history. The technological meteor that will soon replace it is the new, compact flash memory card. In the week and a half I spent running PQI's Intelligent Stick 2.0 ($44.99 to $124.99) through the gauntlet, I found it to be durable, fast and remarkably easy to use -- in addition to being much smaller than a floppy disk. Flash memory, for those who are still on the floppy disk wavelength, performs the same tasks but with no moving parts and no magnets.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
With most of the city's votes tallied, challenger Gregg Bernstein appears to have edged out incumbent Patricia C. Jessamy in the race for Baltimore City state's attorney, her campaign acknowledged Wednesday morning, though Jessamy has not conceded the race. "I just don't know how this happened,” said Jessamy's spokeswoman  Marilyn Harris-Davis, questioning the integrity of Bernstein's campaign, which Jessamy has said was made up of “lies” and misrepresentations about her record.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Frustrated candidates and voters waited hours for results in this week's closest primaries, but elections officials insisted that delays and minor glitches were customary and that the state's voting system worked smoothly. While Marylanders may want electronic machines to spit out instantaneous numbers when polls close, elections officials say the reality of counting is more cumbersome, with room for error. The lag for results in Baltimore City and Baltimore County stemmed from missteps by poll workers and judges, as well as computer software glitches in some places.
NEWS
September 26, 2006
Security problems plague e-voting In all the news about problems in Maryland's recent primary, the most disturbing possibility has not been much discussed in the media ("Ehrlich would end electronic voting," Sept. 21). A recent study by computer scientists at Princeton University has demonstrated that the Diebold touch-screen voting systems used by a number of states, including Maryland, are susceptible to vote stealing. This is easily done by loading malicious software via the machines' removable memory cards.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | September 17, 2006
Anne Arundel County's elections director blamed a shortage of poll workers for a mishap last week that left thousands of primary votes missing and uncounted on election night, and said she worries that a lack of volunteers and inadequate training with electronic voting machines could "overload" the county's vote-counting system in November. Candidates for several offices, including those in the hotly contested Republican primary for county executive, had to wait until the day after the primary to find out who won, as election officials sorted out what happened to several missing electronic memory cards that stored votes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Harner and Lauren Harner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2004
In the world of computer memory, the floppy disk has officially reached brontosaurus status. In other words, it's ancient history. The technological meteor that will soon replace it is the new, compact flash memory card. In the week and a half I spent running PQI's Intelligent Stick 2.0 ($44.99 to $124.99) through the gauntlet, I found it to be durable, fast and remarkably easy to use -- in addition to being much smaller than a floppy disk. Flash memory, for those who are still on the floppy disk wavelength, performs the same tasks but with no moving parts and no magnets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 4, 2003
If you're looking at digital cameras this holiday season, you have plenty of company. Digital cameras are better and easier to use than ever. And this year, you can buy one that produces close-to-film quality without breaking the budget. I noticed the change this summer on a trip to Italy, where at least a third of the tourists I saw were snapping digital photos. According to the U.S. Photo Marketing Association, the number of rolls of film processed by photofinishers here has been declining since 2000, and the organization expects digital cameras to outsell film cameras for the first time this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | October 17, 2002
I have used digital cameras at family gatherings for years, but I've always been squeamish about depending on one to record our vacations. And not without reason. Until recently, digital cameras that cost less than a thousand dollars couldn't deliver the quality of film cameras that sell for a fraction of the price. When you're spending hard-earned vacation time and money to visit the most spectacular locations in the country, you want to bring back the best possible photos. Also, what do you do with your digital pictures on the road?
NEWS
September 26, 2006
Security problems plague e-voting In all the news about problems in Maryland's recent primary, the most disturbing possibility has not been much discussed in the media ("Ehrlich would end electronic voting," Sept. 21). A recent study by computer scientists at Princeton University has demonstrated that the Diebold touch-screen voting systems used by a number of states, including Maryland, are susceptible to vote stealing. This is easily done by loading malicious software via the machines' removable memory cards.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Scott and Andy Scott,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 16, 2003
Think of memory cards as the film for digital cameras. Cards are where your images are stored. At The Dallas Morning News, we've bought hundreds and hundreds of cards in the past few years and have learned what works well - and what doesn't. Let's focus on CompactFlash cards and what to look for when buying them. While CompactFlash cards are the most common type of digital medium, some digital cameras take other media, such as Memory Stick and Smart- Media. Most of what follows will apply to these types of cards as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 11, 2003
When my wife and I took a fly-and-drive vacation to the Pacific Northwest last year, I had no problem figuring out what to do with the photos from my digital camera. I packed a laptop PC and dumped my camera's memory card to the hard drive when it was full. From our hotel rooms, I could transfer the best shots to a photo-sharing service to make sure they wouldn't get lost or ruined by an electronic glitch or airport security systems. The only heavy-duty laptop lugging involved getting the computer from the airport to our car on both ends.
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