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FEATURES
April 22, 2004
Do you have a favorite or unusual memory of spending vacation in Ocean City? If so, we'd like to hear about it - in writing (no more than 175 words, please). We'll publish some of the memories in the Home & Family section. Please mail your stories to Harry Merritt, Features, Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore MD 21278 or e-mail to sun.fea tures@baltsun.com, with the subject field labeled Ocean City. Make sure to include a daytime phone number. If possible, include a photo from the O.C. vacation you're describing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Sam Mellinger and The Kansas City Star | October 9, 2014
Those are the Royals over there in front of all the cameras. That's Eric Hosmer on the cover of Sports Illustrated. That's him and his teammates making the funnest kind of off-the-field news by dropping around $15,000 on a bar tab to say thank you to fans. That's James Shields starting for the third time in five playoff games for a franchise writing a brilliant, welcome and enthralling new history. And that's George Brett, off to the side - always off to the side now - thankful for it all and saying something that may surprise you. “I'm tired of talking about 1985, I really am,” he says.
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NEWS
April 19, 2011
Today in New York, I am wearing an autographed "Baltimore is Best" necktie in memory of former Governor and Baltimore Mayor William Donald Schaefer, which signed necktie was sent me by this amazing advocate for Baltimore. While I am profoundly sad to have heard of Don's passing, I am simultaneously profoundly proud of the "Maryland memories" which his unique style and effervescent personality allowed my wife and me to share. Edward B (Woody) Ryder IV, Greenlawn, N.Y.
SPORTS
By Luke Broadwater and Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
During the dark days of Baltimore baseball, the true fans never gave up. Despite the 14 losing seasons. Despite the maddening trades. Despite the deriding jokes from friends in New York or Boston. So when the Orioles on Sunday finally locked up a spot in the American League Championship Series for the first time in nearly a generation, fans were elated. After sweeping the Detroit Tigers in the AL Division Series, the Orioles need to win four games in the upcoming best-of-seven series to earn their first World Series appearance in 31 years.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 7, 2012
I received a piece of clarification on one of the photos used with yesterday's retrospective of the Ash Wednesday Storm that I found interesting. As one reader remembers it, the "motel" shown above was perhaps a forebear of the condominium towers that arose from the beaches of Ocean City in the 1970s. As the article pointed out, the storm helped clear the way (literally) for towering development over the following decades. Writes Neal Haynie of Reisterstown: Just wanted to thank you for the article in today's SUN - and to identify the photo on page 8. The "motel" was actually the Ocean Side Apartments.  It was built by Alger "Tiny" Abbott and wife Ann, local well-known denizens of O.C.  The two cottages behind the right side of the destroyed complex were their first two ventures (on 36th St.)
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | June 26, 2010
It's easy to get all romantic about the great Orioles teams of the past, especially when the alternative is a current version of the team that is so far under water that it's almost eligible for a federal bailout. Who wouldn't wax nostalgic about the guys who represent everything that was ever good and true about the franchise — who were the cornerstones of a team that would run off 18 straight winning seasons — when they are placed in juxtaposition with the guys who are well on their way to a losing record for the 13th straight year?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
W hen Hutzler's left Baltimore it was like losing my mother," Shirley Cooper said in a phone call the other day. "I spent 99 percent of my shopping dollars at Hutzler's and when I gave a gift, folks always knew where it came from," said the longtime Pikesville resident. Evidently, a lot of readers had memories of the fabled and now vanished Howard Street merchant. Since writing a column several weeks ago about Michael J. Lisicky's valentine to the great department store, "Hutzler's: Where Baltimore Shops," I've been flooded with letters, phone calls and e-mails from readers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2011
Morris Martick, the inimitable Baltimore restaurateur, has died at 88. Martick died of lung cancer early Friday at Union Memorial Hospital. Read Jacques Kelly's obituary . We've started to hear from people who knew Morris Martick, or just about him. We will collect comment, tributes and memories from Baltimore chefs, restaurateurs, friends and former employees here. We'll also add in Martickana from the Baltimore Sun archives. What are your Martick memories? Please add your thoughts and reminiscences in the comments or in the Morris Martick Guest Book   (Martick)
SPORTS
November 8, 2010
Gift for gab a plus Bill Shaikin Los Angeles Times It would be too simple to say that Anderson won because he lasted, although it is true players knew there would be no point in trying to undermine the manager and get him fired. Anderson had great players, of course, especially in Cincinnati. But his genius was in making players feel good even when they faltered. The clubhouse usually opens to the media 10 minutes after a game, but Anderson would keep his clubhouse closed for 15 or 20 minutes after a tough loss.
BUSINESS
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
When her husband of 30 years died in 2004, Rosalie Lijinsky decided she no longer wanted to live in the 3,000-square-foot home they had shared with their daughter in the Columbia neighborhood of Hickory Ridge. She sold the house the same year for $720,000, more than double the purchase price, and rented a townhouse in Columbia with a view of Lake Elkhorn. Five years later, she purchased a townhouse in the same community overlooking the lake for $370,000. Her new home, built in 1986, has four stories, but it's about half the size of her previous residence, she said.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
If Len Bias could attend his own Hall of Fame ceremony on Friday , he'd do so as a 50-year-old man. That's a heck of a thing to wrap your head around if, like me, you grew up as an obsessed ACC basketball fan in the 1980s. Lenny has lived as an idea about what could have been for so long, it's strange to think of him as an actual person. Every generation has its touchstones. For my parents, it was the Kennedy assassination. People my age remember watching from their elementary school classrooms as the Challenger exploded and later on, 9/11.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 30, 2014
The University of Connecticut has completed fundraising for a memorial in honor of former Huskies cornerback Jasper Howard, who was killed at an on-campus dance in 2009. The “lead gift” for the memorial came from Maryland's Randy Edsall, who was Howard's coach at Connecticut. “Jasper Howard represented everything that is good about college athletics,” Edsall said in a statement released by Connecticut. “He loved being a student-athlete at UConn. His tragic death had a bonding reaction with the entire UConn community that none of us will ever forget for the rest of our lives.” Former Connecticut players, as well as Huskies fans from around the country, contributed towards constructing the statue as well.
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The Scunny Memorial Paddle, which ran from Sept. 16 to 21, turned out to be even less fun than Christopher Furst, a marketing director for Power Plant Live, thought it would be. And the novice kayaker didn't go in expecting the 175-mile kayak trip was going to be a day at the beach. "In all honesty, it was the hardest thing I've ever done in my life. I've played every sport, baseball, football," Furst said, "but this was sheer endurance, paddling eight hours a day in an uncomfortable position.
HEALTH
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
More than 1,000 people rode bicycles 150 miles - in the rain, for part of the way - this weekend to raise $2.6 million for cancer research at Johns Hopkins. The funds from the inaugural Ride to Conquer Cancer in Washington, D.C. on Saturday will support the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington and Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. Organizers said the money raised will allow researchers to personalize cancer treatment and screening methods for each patient.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter said his final visit to Camden Yards this week brought back memories of his first full season in pinstripes. That year, he played against the Orioles in the American League Championship Series and he was in awe of Cal Ripken, Jr., whom Jeter still regards as a role model. “I was sort of thrust right into it,” Jeter said before his final regular-season game at Camden Yards on Sunday night. “Baltimore had great teams. I remember coming here in 1996 in my first full season.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Douglas W. Henley, former executive director of the War Memorial and a Carroll County restaurateur, died Wednesday at his Mount Airy home of pancreatic cancer. He was 67. Douglas Wade Henley was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Airy. After graduating in 1965 from Mount Airy High School, he enlisted in the Navy, where he served as a machinist's mate third class until being discharged in 1969. From 1998 until retiring in 2012, Mr. Henley was the executive director of Baltimore's War Memorial.
NEWS
By Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Personnel and guests at Fort Meade gathered Thursday, on the anniversary of the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil, to remember the nearly 3,000 lives lost that day - and pay tribute to 411 fallen first responders with the unveiling of a stained-glass image that includes a piece of the World Trade Center. "It has been 13 years since New York City, New Jersey, and the D.C.-area emergency responders became the stuff of legend as firefighters, police officers and paramedic EMTs followed the call of duty into the pages of history," Deputy Garrison Cmdr.
NEWS
August 31, 2014
When I came to Baltimore-based Erickson Living to work as a public relations summer intern, I imagined I would enrich my professional experiences and skills but never dreamed I'd walk away with such a wealth of knowledge on memory care, memory health and memory fitness. With more than 5 million Americans now suffering from Alzheimer's disease, the timing could not have been better to help raise awareness for the Erickson Living-managed Charlestown retirement community's Memory Support Program and funds for Alzheimer's research.
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