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Memorial Stadium

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SPORTS
May 20, 1992
Baltimore Mayor Kurt Schmoke says that under one possible scenario, the city might tear down Memorial Stadium before its NFL expansion status is clarified. Bidders for a franchise have been counting on having Memorial Stadium available for at least one or two years if the city gets a pro team, serving as the new team's home while a second stadium is built.The Evening Sun would like to know what you think. Should Baltimore tear down Memorial Stadium, regardless of whether the NFL has awarded the city a new franchise?
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 9, 2014
One of the things I like about baseball - and there are a lot of things to like, especially when the Orioles reach the American League Championship Series - is the way it marks time. You don't have to be a stats freak to remember the milestones. When your team is alive in October, the year of that happy development registers forever. In the Barry Levinson-directed film adaptation of Bernard Malamud's "The Natural," the fictional slugger Roy Hobbs shatters the glass clock in center field with a line-drive home run. That is to say: Baseball will never be ruled by time.
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NEWS
September 29, 1991
* DON SHULA, COLTS HEAD COACH, 1963-69: "I had a lot of great moments in Memorial Stadium and I shared a lot of victories with so many great players. I was privileged to coach people like Unitas, Berry, Moore and so many others, but what set the Colts apart from other teams was the unique relationship we had with our fans."It was a special feeling to play in Memorial Stadium. There was no greater thrill for me than coming out on the field right before kickoff and hearing those cheers, and it left me with memories I will never forget.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Mom-Mom and Pop-Pop listening to the Orioles on the radio on the front porch. Grandpa keeping score with pencil and paper. The yells of the fans floating over from Memorial Stadium. Chuck Thompson saying, "Ain't the beer cold. " Kids falling asleep on the ride home from the game. For many Baltimoreans, the story of the Orioles is the story of their family. It's a way for fathers and sons to talk, for mothers and daughters to connect, for grandparents to pass down traditions. Through the dark years of losing seasons, these families kept the Orioles magic alive.
NEWS
By Janet Ruth Goldstein | March 27, 1998
IT'S a shame that there isn't more nostalgia associated with public places like Memorial Stadium, which is slated to be torn down by 2001.I guess nostalgia is dead. That "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" mentality that used to infest Americans with so much hope and optimism has been replaced by a jaded fatalism. It is a dichotomy we must learn to live with, that our yearning toward the future must always do battle with our natural desire to preserve the past.The stadiums of ancient times have been handed down to us intact.
NEWS
April 8, 1991
For 37 years, Baltimore's most dramatic sports moments have happened at Memorial Stadium. Rabid football fans transformed it into "the world's largest outdoor insane asylum" for their beloved Colts, giving the home team a keen advantage over opponents. Baseball fans have known it as the major-league Orioles' only home, a neighborhood ball field that both players and spectators found endearing.Today, the park hosts its last baseball opener. Next year, the Orioles will inaugurate their spanking-new playpen at Camden Yards.
NEWS
September 29, 1991
At age 20, I returned to Baltimore, having served in the U.S. Navy in North Africa in August of 1945. My father, who was a big football fan, obtained tickets to a college game at the stadium on a balmy Saturday afternoon in November of 1945.He bought tickets for me, a co-worker of his and the co-worker'twin cousins. The twins turned out to be two very pretty girls who had never been to a football game. I sat next to the taller of the two girls and while explaining the intricacies of the game of football, I asked her for a date.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 7, 2014
If there's any joy in Baltimore this week, it comes from baseball and the Orioles. With this frustrating city having slipped into another cycle of summer shootings - one of them ending the life of a 3-year-old girl - I guess we turn to baseball for communal relief from all that's awful, all that makes us angry and weary. Having the Orioles in first place helps. And, further, it helps to hear a pleasant fellow named Mike Cataneo tell why his father bought four season tickets to Orioles games 60 years ago, for the team's inaugural season here.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
The Ravens are flying the Owings Mills coop to come to Annapolis, and the capital city is ready to greet them. The Ravens will be at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium Monday for a 7 p.m. practice that's free and open to the public. Events include post-practice player autograph signings for children, activities for younger fans, giveaways, and cheerleader and mascot meet-and-greets. The session also features a youth football clinic on the field before the practice. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. It's the third year the team has made the trek to the state capital, solidifying a relationship between the team and Anne Arundel.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
Arthur L. Rhoads Jr., a Baltimore attorney who maintained a general law practice for more than six decades, died Thursday of complications from a stroke at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 87. "He was a lawyer's lawyer and was representing the little guy, like Andy Griffith on the TV show 'Matlock' before there was a 'Matlock,' " said Andrew J. Long, who retired from the practice of law in 2001. "He was an incredible man and friend. There were no airs about him. " The son of a grocer and a homemaker, Arthur Lampe Rhoads Jr. was born and raised in Frederick, where he graduated in 1942 from St. John's High School.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
1954 Record: 54-100 Place: Seventh in American League Manager: Jimmy Dykes Most Valuable Oriole: Chuck Diering Batting leader: Cal Abrams (.293) Home run leader: Vern Stephens (8) RBI leader: Vern Stephens (46) Wins leader: Bob Turley (14) ERA leader: Duane Pillette (3.12) Notable: After 52 years as the St. Louis Browns, the Orioles played their first home game in Memorial Stadium on April 15, a 3-1 win over the Chicago White Sox. After the season, new manager-general manager Paul Richards completed a 17-player swap - the largest in Major League Baseball history - that brought catcher Gus Triandos, outfielder Gene Woodling and eight other players to the Orioles.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Herbert Charles Wagner, a retired pharmacist, died Dec. 21 at Sinai Hospital after suffering a fall a week earlier. He was 82 and lived at the Kensington Park Retirement Community. Born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park, he was the son of Raphael "Ray" Wagner, a pharmacist who owned a business adjacent to the Hippodrome Theatre, and Rose Waller Wagner, a teacher. He attended the Robert E. Lee School, No. 49, and was a 1948 City College graduate. He earned a degree in biology at the Johns Hopkins University.
SPORTS
By Eric Meany and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Although it has been more than 11 years since Memorial Stadium was demolished, much of the concrete that once made up the bygone home of the Orioles, Colts and Ravens continues to host a hotbed of activity nearly 18 miles southeast of its previous location. In 2002, approximately 10,000 cubic yards of rubble from the stadium was deposited over a 6-acre site on the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay, 3 miles west of Tolchester Beach in Kent County. Every year since then, the Perry Hall chapter of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association has organized the construction and placement of reef balls - hollow, flat-bottomed concrete blobs with holes - on a 1-acre section of the Memorial Stadium reef.
NEWS
By Frank Askin | December 25, 2013
Although I have lived in New Jersey for nearly 60 years, I still explain my strange loyalties by saying "You can take the boy out of Baltimore, but you can't take Baltimore out of the boy. " While I left Charm City for good in 1955 (long before the advent of that moniker), I still subscribe to Major League Baseball's Extra Innings so I can watch the Orioles on TV all summer. And for years I tried to put a hex on the Indianapolis Colts for sneaking out of town with our name in he middle of the night.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
After five years in the nation's capital, the Military Bowl is staking out a future in Annapolis, and city leaders are hoping to cash in on the cachet of hosting a nationally televised college football bowl game. With events including a flyover by a B-25 bomber and the landing of a parachute team at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, bowl organizers hope Friday's game between the University of Maryland and Marshall University (W.Va.) taps the military pride of Annapolis - home of the Naval Academy and plenty of Navy retirees.
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