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By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2007
As diplomats and world leaders gather at the U.S. Naval Academy today in hopes of laying the groundwork for a new Middle East peace agreement, they will be surrounded by reminders of the terrible cost of war. Memorial Hall, where President Bush will kick off the conference this morning and the bulk of the official events will be held, is filled with tablets that carry the names of 2,623 fallen graduates, killed in conflicts dating to the Civil War. ...
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SPORTS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. - The ride from Collingswood, N.J., to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame takes about four hours by car. Fueled by a passion for the game very few possess, a South Jersey gym rat named Gary Williams arrived here in the class of 2014 after a four-plus-decade coaching journey. “It's a great thrill, a very humbling experience,” Williams told a packed house at Symphony Hall that included nearly 100 family members, former players, assistants and friends, including Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti and former Maryland governor Robert Ehrlich.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2005
Sailors from a Navy nuclear warship surfaced this week in Galesville, a serene country town known as the birthplace of American Quakerism - and they arrived with a decidedly pacifist spirit. Near the blue bay waters and a general store where blueberry pies are baked every morning stands a sign marking the place where William Penn, the Quaker founder of Pennsylvania, once came to meet members of the Religious Society of Friends about 300 years ago. Crew members from the Trident-class ballistic missile submarine USS Maryland came in peace.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
A few months after Maryland men's basketball star Len Bias died from a cocaine overdose in June 1986, and a few days after Dunbar High coach Bob Wade was named to replace Lefty Driesell as coach, a reporter called Gary Williams to ask whether he would have considered taking the job. "It would have been hard, but I would have had to do it - Maryland's my school," said Williams, who was entering his ninth year as a Division I head coach and had...
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2004
It is not the soaring glass ceiling, huge oil paintings or glittering chandeliers that draw most visitors to the Naval Academy's Memorial Hall. Instead, it is the plaques engraved with the names of 3,477 graduates of the Annapolis military college who have been killed in military action or operations since the Civil War. "They hit you like a brick in the face," said retired Col. John W. Ripley, a 1962 graduate who is chairman of the committee that oversaw...
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 7, 1996
TOKYO -- Fifty-five years ago today, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. Earlier, it had invaded China. No one could easily doubt that Japan was the aggressor on both fronts.But Japan is still reluctant to confront its war record, as has become clear in a controversy over a new government-sponsored museum that would retell how the nation suffered during the war but ignore the issue of its responsibility for the suffering of other nations.For some in Japan, the question is not so much why the War Dead Peace Memorial Hall needs to be built.
NEWS
October 12, 1995
Renovated WMC hall to be dedicated tomorrowThe formal dedication of Western Maryland College's renovated Memorial Hall, which includes an address by Gov. Parris N. Glendening, will be at 4 p.m. tomorrow in Baker Memorial Chapel.Formerly called Science Hall, the building was designed by Baltimore architect Charles Anderson and first occupied in 1929. It was renamed Memorial Hall in 1958.The remodeling is being financed by private donations, loans from the federal government and part of a $1.9 million grant from the state.
NEWS
August 16, 1994
A $7.3 million renovation project at Western Maryland College will completely change the school's academic buildings by the end of the school year, college officials said.The major restorations will occur in Memorial Hall, the fine arts building, Alumni Hall and Levine Hall. Other minor changes and improvements will be made to the college's art studio, and some faculty offices will be relocated to other buildings on campus."It'll be interesting for new students," Ethan Seidel, vice president for administration and finance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Helen B. Jones | March 27, 2003
If the combination of a road trip and an antiques show sounds like a good idea to you, you're in luck this weekend. The Antiques Show at York takes place tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday in the York Expo Center in York, Pa. More than 50 dealers will offer room settings showcasing 18th-, 19th- and early-20th-century furniture, primitives, textiles, clocks, jewelry, decorative arts and collectibles. But wait - there's more! Running concurrently is the Spring York Folk Art & Craft Show, which will feature the wares of more than 120 artisans and craftspeople.
NEWS
November 10, 1994
Carroll County developer and Western Maryland College trustee Martin K. P. Hill has committed a $1.25 million gift for the college's building program and provide support for the annual fund program.Six academic buildings are undergoing extensive renovations, including Memorial Hall, the largest classroom facility at the Westminster campus, and the college plans to construct a new Science Center in the next few years.Mr. Hill announced his gift to college trustees Sunday at a conference at the Aspen Institute to discuss the college's future plans.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
All Gary Williams ever dreamed of being was a high school basketball coach. After graduating from Maryland in 1968, Williams thought his dream had come true when he became the junior varsity and, later, varsity coach at Woodrow Wilson High in Camden, N.J. The dream eventually grew, as did Williams' stature as a coach, over the next four decades. More than two years after he retired from a coaching career highlighted by Maryland's first national title, Williams was nominated Friday for basketball's highest individual honor: induction into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2007
As diplomats and world leaders gather at the U.S. Naval Academy today in hopes of laying the groundwork for a new Middle East peace agreement, they will be surrounded by reminders of the terrible cost of war. Memorial Hall, where President Bush will kick off the conference this morning and the bulk of the official events will be held, is filled with tablets that carry the names of 2,623 fallen graduates, killed in conflicts dating to the Civil War. ...
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | July 4, 2007
Throughout her accomplished Naval Academy and Marine Corps career, Capt. Jennifer J. Harris never attracted special attention for being a woman. So it was fitting, friends said, that she was not singled out in death, when the academy placed her name yesterday among hundreds of others on a marble tablet designated to honor graduates who were killed in action. She is only the second woman in school history to be added to the list, which includes 954 men dating back to the Civil War, many long celebrated as heroes.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
A group of Naval Academy grads who watched a preview of Annapolis this week agreed the movie was a pretty good yarn but that it diminished the "majesty" of the academy. Lawrence Heyworth III, Class of 1982 and a vice president of the Naval Academy Alumni Association, called it "An Officer and A Gentleman light." "It would have been a lot more entertaining to me if there had been a theater full of midshipmen, just to hear the reaction of the midshipmen to the inaccuracies of the movie, and there were some," said Heyworth, of Annapolis.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2005
Sailors from a Navy nuclear warship surfaced this week in Galesville, a serene country town known as the birthplace of American Quakerism - and they arrived with a decidedly pacifist spirit. Near the blue bay waters and a general store where blueberry pies are baked every morning stands a sign marking the place where William Penn, the Quaker founder of Pennsylvania, once came to meet members of the Religious Society of Friends about 300 years ago. Crew members from the Trident-class ballistic missile submarine USS Maryland came in peace.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2004
It is not the soaring glass ceiling, huge oil paintings or glittering chandeliers that draw most visitors to the Naval Academy's Memorial Hall. Instead, it is the plaques engraved with the names of 3,477 graduates of the Annapolis military college who have been killed in military action or operations since the Civil War. "They hit you like a brick in the face," said retired Col. John W. Ripley, a 1962 graduate who is chairman of the committee that oversaw...
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
A group of Naval Academy grads who watched a preview of Annapolis this week agreed the movie was a pretty good yarn but that it diminished the "majesty" of the academy. Lawrence Heyworth III, Class of 1982 and a vice president of the Naval Academy Alumni Association, called it "An Officer and A Gentleman light." "It would have been a lot more entertaining to me if there had been a theater full of midshipmen, just to hear the reaction of the midshipmen to the inaccuracies of the movie, and there were some," said Heyworth, of Annapolis.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2003
PORT DEPOSIT - Memorial Hall - once the proud centerpiece of the turn-of-the-century private Tome School, and later a prep school for the Naval Academy - shows its many years of neglect. The clock from its tower is gone, replaced by a circle of plywood with peeling paint. Inside, much of the iron railing from twin stairways leading to the auditorium is gone - ripped out by looters. Giant chandeliers suffered the same fate. A sign out front warns: "Absolutely No Entry Permitted. This Building Has Been Condemned."
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