Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMemoir
IN THE NEWS

Memoir

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Rosenthal | April 10, 2012
Carole King's new memoir, "A Natural Woman," was released today, and she's making the rounds wuith television and radio interviews. The book chronicles her rise from a New York childhood influenced by music, to her discovery of rhythm and blues on the radio shows of legendary DJ Alan Freed , to acclaim with the hit album "Tapestry," (a hallmark of my generation) and through her troubled marriages. (In two weeks, King is scheduled to release "The Legendary Demos," an album of her early recordings, including " Yours Until Tomorrow.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The photos of author Robert Timberg in recent years aren't as horrifying as his memoir leads readers to expect. His eyes are direct and unflinching, and his mouth expresses wry amusement. He has the kind of wrinkles normally found on a 74-year-old man and a patch of skin across his nose that at a casual glance appears sunburned. There's nothing about Timberg's appearance now that could be described as freakish, nothing that would cause young children to howl in fright. It's taken Timberg more than 35 operations - including one without anesthesia - and 47 years to achieve that face, and he's still not entirely reconciled to it. There are moments even now when he looks in the mirror and is first startled, then furious.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 11, 2012
Irreverent comedian and bad-girl author Chelsea Handler has turned her popular memoir, "Are You There, Vodka? It's Me, Chelsea," into a new sitcom that makes its debut tonight. The NBC series, "Are You There, Chelsea?" stars Laura Prepon as Handler, while Handler plays the older sister - who is reportedly based on her real sister Simone, according to People. A review in the Los Angeles Times said the show "takes the intemperate habits that were long the province of the crazy sidekick and gives them to the lead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
When M.P. Mariappan was born 95 years ago, England's King George V was emperor of India. Mahatma Gandhi hadn't yet taken up India's struggle for independence. Most Indians lived in small, scattered villages instead of in cities. Mariappan survived plague, the Great Depression, World War II and a 1,700-mile death trek from Burma, where he was living at the time, to his homeland. He became a respected fruit merchant who struggled to educate his eight children, boosting the family decisively from their lowly caste and into the middle class.
NEWS
By JOSEPH R. L. STERNE | February 12, 1994
Gerald E. Griffin, editor of this page from 1964 to 1972 and before that chief of The Sun's Washington Bureau, has written ''A Memoir at 85'' that can stand as a model for all those now living who want their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren to know what they were all about.I know next to nothing about my great-grandparents, only a little more about my grandparents and have but a sketchy idea about the early life of my parents. Would that they had written something like Jerry's 166-page memoir.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | June 6, 1998
Few politicians in modern memory have been mourned as steadfastly as Robert Kennedy, whose death 30 years ago todayconstituted one of the greatest wastes of the 20th century. "Robert F. Kennedy: A Memoir" (8 p.m.-11 p.m. tomorrow, repeats midnight-3 a.m., Discovery) lets his associates,campaign workers and family members explain why. The result is extraordinarily moving, especially his eldest daughter, Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, who reads a letter her father wrote to her upon her uncle John's assassination.
NEWS
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,special to the sun | January 21, 1996
"Time Present, Time Past: A Memoir," by Bill Bradley. Knopf. 442 pages. $25Bill Bradley's new memoir may be the first example of a new genre: the non-campaign book. He is retiring after three terms as U.S. senator from New Jersey and, despite earlier reports, seems unlikely to seek the presidency this year. So, unlike political leaders' books that are little more than expanded stump speeches, this is a summing-up of Mr. Bradley's 18 years as a well-respected figure in Washington, D.C., and a well-traveled campaigner for Democratic candidates.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1995
Soon after she moved to Montana in 1964, Annick Smith became curious about the state's history. She would go to the library at the University of Montana in Missoula; there she would peruse such volumes as Granville Street's 1925 memoir "Forty Years on the Frontier," which told of rustlers and vigilantes and other colorful sorts so familiar in Wild West myth.She read other accounts, too -- ones written by women. These did not concentrate on gunfights and desperadoes but on the day-to-day lives of people trying to establish a life on the frontier.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The photos of author Robert Timberg in recent years aren't as horrifying as his memoir leads readers to expect. His eyes are direct and unflinching, and his mouth expresses wry amusement. He has the kind of wrinkles normally found on a 74-year-old man and a patch of skin across his nose that at a casual glance appears sunburned. There's nothing about Timberg's appearance now that could be described as freakish, nothing that would cause young children to howl in fright. It's taken Timberg more than 35 operations - including one without anesthesia - and 47 years to achieve that face, and he's still not entirely reconciled to it. There are moments even now when he looks in the mirror and is first startled, then furious.
NEWS
By Drew Limsky and Drew Limsky,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1995
"12 Going on 13: An Autobiographical Novel," by Jan Myrdal. Chicago: Lake View Press/Ravenwood Books. 200 pages. $19.95/cloth The son of not one, but two, Nobel laureates, Jan Myrdal finds the distinction more of a burden than a blessing. The third in a trilogy of autobiographical works about his rarefied but tumultuous childhood, and an absorbing read by any standard, "12 Going on 13" documents both Mr. Myrdal's fervid imagination and his awakening moral conscience.Set during World War II, the memoir offers a child's perception of a world spinning out of control.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Author and Baltimore teacher Sheri Booker has won the NAACP Image Award for outstanding literary work by a debut author. Booker, a teacher at Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women and a graduate of both Notre Dame of Maryland University and Goucher College, won the award for her Baltimore-based memoir "Nine Years Under: Coming of Age in an Inner City Funeral Home," which recounts the nine years she spent working at the Wylie Funeral Home...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
Young buck. Buck wild. Make a buck. Buck the system. The buck stops here. "Buck" stops here. In his office at Morgan State University, MK Asante, the youngest professor ever to receive tenure at the school, is reflecting upon his teen years in the city he calls "Killadelphia, Pistolvania," and that are chronicled in his acclaimed recent memoir, "Buck. " "Buck" never was his nickname. Asante chose the title because he lived through nearly every variation of that "short but loaded" word and acted them out in roughly the order they're presented above.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 21, 2014
One of the best and most enduring aspects of presidential cabinets has been the willingness of many chief executives to appoint at least one member from the opposition party. The practice demonstrates bipartisanship and also gives the president access to views that may not always be offered by loyalist appointees. The custom of reaching across the party aisle has been brought into question by the new memoir of former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, kept in the job by President Obama as a carryover from the George W. Bush presidency.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
For acclaimed mystery novelist Martha Grimes, the witches' caldron that nearly proved her undoing didn't contain the usual eye of newt and toe of frog. Instead, it held 10 parts gin or sometimes vodka, a splash of vermouth, lemon peel, olive and onion. Grimes was an alcoholic so high-functioning that the people who knew her best never suspected that dry martinis were her intoxicant of choice. Since 1981, the writer, now 82, has published at least one book each year, including 22 of the best-selling Richard Jury mysteries.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 15, 2013
The publication of Alfred Sommer's new memoir, "10 Lessons in Public Health," comes precisely 30 years after the publication of the most important thing he's ever written: "Increased mortality in children with mild vitamin A deficiency," a report of a medical discovery that has saved an estimated 10 million children from blindness and death. This is one of the classic stories from the realm of epidemiology, the stuff of medical detectives, and for it we slip back to the winter holidays of 1982 in Baltimore: Sommer, an ophthalmologist and professor at the (pre-Bloomberg)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Jeanine Cummins wants more than anything in the world to give a voice to people who are unable to speak for themselves. In the past, she has spoken for family members. In her 2004 memoir, "A Rip in Heaven," Cummins spoke for her cousins, Julie and Robin Kerry, who were gang-raped and murdered in 1991. She spoke for her older brother, Tom, who also was hurt in that attack on a bridge outside St. Louis. "My cousin, Julie was a really gifted writer," says Cummins, 38, who grew up in Gaithersburg.
NEWS
By Susan Baer | September 17, 1995
Random House may have lavished a $6 million advance on Colin L. Powell for his just- published memoirs, "My American Journey." But it looks as if the publishing house skimped on fact-checkers.In the 950,000 copies of the book that hit the stores Friday, Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is referred to, in the text and the index, as Carl Schmoke."I'm looking forward to reading the book regardless of whether they spelled my first name right or not," Mr. Schmoke said yesterday after the error was pointed out to him. "Hopefully, it can be corrected in the second printing."
NEWS
By Brenda L. Becker and Brenda L. Becker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 1996
"Man-to-Man: Surviving Prostate Cancer," by Michael Korda. 224 pages. Random House. $20.If you are unlucky enough to be one of the 200,000-plus men in the U.S. to get prostate cancer each year, this mercilessly frank account of publishing hotshot Michael Korda's bout with the disease will probably be a page-turner, its flaws irrelevant. Otherwise, spare yourself, unless you are incurably hooked on the genre the publisher calls "health/memoir."Health/memoirs follow a pretty tight formula, ideal for TV movies-of-the-week: The author (usually a celebrity, for who wants to read about the medical woes of the obscure?
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | September 22, 2012
Even as I rejoice for the hometown Baltimore Orioles, I'm depressed by the play of another favorite team, the N.Y. Mets. Another spring filled with hope, another summer of depressing reality. But there is one bright spot: R.A. Dickey, who is chasing a 20-win season with an improbable knuckleball that was developed late in his career. Dickey, one of the subjects of the new documentary, "Knuckleball!" appears to be a thinker as well as pitcher. He has already written a memoir, “Wherever I Wind Up,” and has a deal to write three children's books.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 12, 2012
It was one of the true watershed moments in Baltimore sports history, so why should anyone be surprised that Frank Deford - one of the greatest sportswriters of the modern era and a Charm City native - would be there to witness it? Well, slightly after the fact. The date was July 4, 1944 and the place was Greenmount Avenue and 29th Street, where a 5-year-old Deford stood with his mother and looked at the smoking pile of debris that remained of Oriole Park. The old wooden stadium was destroyed the night before by a fire that some now credit with helping turn Baltimore into a major league city.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.