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NEWS
By Ari Schwartz and Ari Schwartz,sun reporter | October 3, 2007
For six years, Richard Hammond has worked out at the Howard County YMCA four to five times a week, putting up with older equipment and a crowded facility. "The air conditioning works off and on, and this place is getting more and more members. After January 1st, when everyone decides to get in shape for the year, this place gets packed," Hammond said. By spring, however, his patience will be rewarded. Targeting a March 2008 completion date, the YMCA is constructing a 36,000-square-foot facility that will more than double the size of the "Y."
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 1, 1997
With the United Parcel Service settlement seen as a major triumph and an omen of future success, union leaders, and many experts, say the labor movement is in its strongest position in nearly a generation and is poised to increase its membership after a two-decade decline.This Labor Day might be a watershed moment for unions, some experts say, because the 15-day UPS strike created a surge of sympathy for unions as many of the efforts at revitalization pushed by John Sweeney, the AFL-CIO's president, have taken root.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | October 20, 1991
Economic development officials, political activists and residents disagreed at a hearing Wednesday on whether Carroll should continue its28-year affiliation with the Baltimore region's premier planning agency.Several speakers, including Carroll's first economic development director, Richard W. Story, stressed that the county is linked tothe metropolitan area geographically, economically and culturally and that it benefits in many ways from membership in the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1997
Baltimore County Circuit Judge Thomas J. Bollinger Sr. -- reprimanded in 1994 for insensitive comments in a rape case -- has wiped out a businessman's conviction for beating his estranged wife, acting after the man said he needed a clean record, among other reasons, to join a country club.Bollinger changed Charles H. Weiner's 1995 battery conviction to probation before judgment Friday, after a 15-minute hearing in which Weiner's lawyer cited the "stigma of a criminal record."The ruling came over the strong objections of a prosecutor who recalled the beating that left Weiner's former wife with head, ear and eye injuries.
NEWS
By David McLemore and David McLemore,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | May 15, 2005
SAN ANTONIO, Texas - It's early on a Thursday night at VFW Post No. 76, and the former door gunner sits in the dimness of the lounge sipping his Miller Lite. Across the room, obscured by a thin haze of cigarette smoke, two men at the long wooden bar watch a basketball game. A thin, gray-haired ex-Marine sniper ponders the jukebox choices before choosing Toby Keith. "See how peaceful it is here," says Domingo Vasquez, 58, who spent 18 months of his youth as a Huey helicopter door gunner above Vietnam's Central Highlands.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 4, 1995
For 75 years, a building in Historic Ellicott City has served as a meeting place for the Patmos Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. But the lodge's aging membership needs handicapped access and more convenient parking, so it has put the structure up for sale.During its century-old history, the property at 8210 Main St. has been a pool hall, a barbershop, a bar and a variety of other businesses. But for most of its existence, the philanthropic Masons have occupied its second and third floors.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
Music is pumping, hearts are thumping and the joint is really jumping, but nobody in Charmaine Gordon's class is swinging to a big band. The women's T-shirts are damp with sweat, and they are bending, stretching, stepping and lifting their legs in a small Columbia gym that is gaining recognition for what it does for its members and the community. Last month, Gordon and her Synergy - the Future of Fitness for Women were recognized by the American Heart Association as the top fund-raising team in Howard County for the nonprofit's American Heart Walk.
BUSINESS
By RICK POPELY and RICK POPELY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 22, 2006
WOODSTOCK, Ala. -- As Jeremy Kimbrell watches thousands of United Auto Workers lose their jobs to plant closings at General Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co., he finds a silver lining. The workers aren't to blame, says Kimbrell, a pro-union activist at a nonunion Mercedes-Benz plant near Tuscaloosa, Ala. Their customers took a different route and went for more fuel-efficient vehicles. Now the unionized workers at GM and Ford are getting buyouts. "They're getting pensions. They have guarantees, and we have none.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | January 18, 2004
If your first resolution of the new year was to take better care of your body, your second resolution ought to be not being suckered into buying the wrong health club membership. Health clubs put on a big sales push each January, and they sell more memberships this month than in any other. The reputation of the fitness business has been tarnished by high-pressure sales tactics used by some club operators. If you're not careful, you may end up shackled to contracts that are difficult to cancel, even with legitimate medical reasons.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
In the months before Life Time Fitness opened for business in February, Columbia Association tallied record-breaking attendance at its sports and fitness facilities, according to a third-quarter financial report. The association's sports and fitness division is changing its focus to keep the wheels turning, water splashing and tennis balls flying at record levels. "We have completed our facility renovations and changed our policies and we have been successful at getting more members than ever into our clubs," said Rob Goldman, the association's vice president for sport and fitness.
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