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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1997
Squeezed between flat premiums and rising medical costs, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Maryland said yesterday its 1996 earnings fell about a third, to $29.6 million from $44.3 million the year before, despite increases in membership and revenues.Membership grew by 64,000, or 5 percent, to 1.35 million, with almost all of the growth coming in the second half of the year. Largest areas of growth were Blue Cross HMO for senior citizens, MediCareFirst and the small employer market.While premiums stayed flat, the growth in membership pushed revenue to $1.96 billion, up 4.2 percent from $1.88 billion in 1995.
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NEWS
By HEARST NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- For environmental groups, success in the 1990s means giving up the fight to save the world and instead battling for what Americans really care about: things in their own backyard."
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | August 23, 1992
At first glance, Oriole Park's Camden Club seems to have everything you'd expect of an upscale restaurant overlooking one of baseball's most talked-about ballparks: Good food, appealing surroundings and striking views.But five months after opening, the club is missing one desirable ingredient: A dining room bustling with members.The club, located on two floors in the B&O Warehouse, attracted some interest among fans of Orioles baseball and linen tablecloths when it served its first gourmet meals last April.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 31, 2003
ANKARA, Turkey - The Turkish parliament took another step in this country's quest to join the European Union by giving overwhelming approval yesterday to landmark reforms designed to significantly curtail the political power of the military. On paper, at least, this represents a remarkable move in a country whose very existence is defined by the army. The modern Turkish republic was forged by military commanders from the ruins of the Ottoman Empire, and the army has steered most major political developments since.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1997
The AFL-CIO launched a $5 million TV campaign on Baltimore's airwaves yesterday to improve the image of organized labor -- and to add to its membership.The media campaign features four commercials that will run for eight weeks locally and in Milwaukee, Seattle, San Antonio and St. Louis. The blitz will be supplemented by community activities such as union-sponsored rallies and other events, AFL-CIO officials said at a news conference in Southwest Baltimore yesterday.For years, unions have suffered from declining memberships.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | March 11, 2007
Tucked between storefronts in the middle of Towson, a glass door marked "Odd Fellows Temple, Towson Lodge No. 79" leads to a narrow staircase. At the top, a heavy door with a peephole opens to a hall where throne-like chairs face an altar. In a back room, a skeleton lies in a casket. Generations have met in this stone building to plan good works or hold mystic ceremonies. They were brothers in a secret society, founded in the Old World but, in America, first chartered in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | April 19, 1992
The Ku Klux Klan will make a swing through Mount Airy as part of an 11-town, three-month membership drive that is expected to culminate with an Ocean City rally on July 4."We want to let the folks in Mount Airy know what the Klan is all about, that we are against drug abuse, child molestation, rapists and all of that stuff," said Dale Reeves, an officer with the Invisible Empire, Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. "We just want to let people see what we're against and what we condone."What the white supremacist group condones, however, is far more than a world free of child abuse, drug addiction and rape, says a former vice president for the Carroll County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
The NAACP is going door-to-door this month in a bid to boost its national membership by reminding Americans of all races what the organization is doing and how new members can get involved.Although the NAACP's leadership is strong and its finances stable, organization officials have struggled to boost national membership in recent years. To address the problem, it hired its first membership consultant this summer.The Knock Across America campaign asks each member of the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to knock on at least 10 doors to tell friends and neighbors about the organization.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Catherine Collins and Tom Hundley and Catherine Collins,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 18, 2004
LONDON - For both parties it felt more like a shotgun wedding than a match made in heaven, but in the end the European Union proposed and Turkey accepted. European political leaders agreed warily to begin formal membership talks with Turkey next October. In return, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan accepted a compromise under which Ankara will extend a trade protocol to its Greek adversaries on the divided island of Cyprus. The Greek half of Cyprus, which Turkey does not recognize, joined the EU this year.
NEWS
May 25, 1996
LOOK, CHILDREN. See the teachers. See the teachers be selfish. See them ignore the rules. See the teachers make a mockery of the democratic election they held to choose a new president of their union.It is outrageous for board members of the Baltimore Teachers Union who remain loyal to ousted BTU President Irene B. Dandridge to attempt to undercut the authority of her elected successor. The BTU membership has spoken. It does not want Ms. Dandridge, whose tenure was tainted by disclosures in The Sun that she and other top BTU officials were paid far more than their members, received large interest-free salary advances from the deficit-ridden union and hired relatives as full-time employees.
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