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By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2004
MOSCOW - Lithuanian President Rolandas Paksas was removed from office yesterday for his support of a businessman with alleged links to Russian organized crime, leaving the Baltic republic in political upheaval on the eve of its entry into the European Union. In a close vote, members of parliament approved the impeachment of the 47-year-old former stunt pilot, who acknowledged "mistakes," but insisted he was a corruption-fighter and victim of "a system that ... is more powerful than you can imagine."
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NEWS
August 17, 2011
We should learn the lessons of the London riots, as the root causes can also be found in Baltimore. The real reason why British youth loots is simply because they are following the example shown to them by the establishment. Young Brits are immersed in a culture where looting has become a way of life which has been highly rewarding to those at the top. The bankers have looted the tax-payers, the members of Parliament have looted their expense allowances, and "celebrity culture" has looted the moral seed bank of the nation.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 13, 2004
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's supreme religious leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, refused to intervene yesterday in a confrontation between the conservative and reformist camps after a religious authority barred thousands of pro-reform candidates from running in parliamentary elections. "Once all legal steps have been exhausted, if we arrive at a sensitive situation which demands a decision, there can be no doubt that I will intervene and give my opinion," Khamenei said at a meeting with the country's governor generals, state-run television reported.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | May 21, 2009
I come to London for the signage ("Danger: Men working overhead"), and to pick up a tube of Euthymol toothpaste and devour a cup of Mr. Whippy lemon ice and a package of chocolate HobNobs, and to enjoy the roomy taxicabs and the cabbies' no-hesitation style of driving, their bold U-turns, and to observe the gilded gates and the Mounted Guards and all the storybook tinges of aristocracy so dear to us Americans. And terrific theater. Saw a beautiful performance by puppets - life-sized horses in War Horse at the National Theatre - shells of horses with visible frames and legs of two puppeteers inside, another manipulating the head, yet the sight of the beasts grazing, nuzzling, shying, rearing up was the most perfect and believable thing I've seen onstage in a long time.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 25, 1990
LONDON -- Former Defense Minister Michael Heseltine picked up his first heavyweight support yesterday -- from other former Thatcher Cabinet members -- in the battle to succeed Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.But Mr. Heseltine still appeared short of winning a majority in Conservative Party voting this week.Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major, at 47 the youngest candidate, appeared to be closing fast on Mr. Heseltine, while Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd appeared to be trailing in the race toward Tuesday's crucial vote.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | May 5, 1994
LONDON -- Prime Minister John Major, skittering around among the most dissatisfied voters in a generation, faces two elections in just over a month which can decide Britain's place in the European Union and his future as Conservative Party leader and prime minister.Within the Conservative Party, the most disaffected are the Euro-skeptics, members of Parliament and the Cabinet who dislike the European Union and some who would even pull Britain out of it.L The European issue runs through the party like a fault line.
NEWS
June 25, 1995
Prime Minister John Major, every British caricaturist's model of a wimp in politics, knocked his party's back-stabbers on their behinds by resigning as party leader. His stock immediately soared. He will win re-election as leader by Conservative Members of Parliament, or lose the prime ministry.There are two basic objections to Mr. Major by some Tories. The first is that the unpopular governing party seems destined to lose the election that must be held by summer 1997 to a revived Labor Party.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 13, 2000
NEW DELHI, India - India's former prime minister, P. V. Narasimha Rao, was sentenced yesterday to three years of "rigorous" imprisonment for his role in bribing members of Parliament to vote for his government in a 1993 no-confidence measure. The 79-year-old politician led the nation from 1991 to 1996, opening India's socialist economy to free-market reforms. While in office, he also titillated the country by publishing his own pulp fiction filled with political chicanery and racy sex. Rao was fined $2,200, but he was not jailed.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 4, 1994
MOSCOW -- Starting May 15, every member of the Georgian Parliament will be given a government-issue pistol, but with one condition attached: Legislators must check their guns at the door when Parliament is in session.It sounds a little like the Wild West, except that in the mountainous Caucasian republic of Georgia they don't have any sheriffs.To say Georgia is a trigger-happy country is like saying that Iowa has a thing about corn. In fact, it's probably fair to say that guns are carried by most adults in Georgia, a country where the writ of law doesn't amount to much, if anything.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | October 10, 1991
JERUSALEM -- Until the Jewish settlers arrived yesterday, the small stone building perched on a steep hill in the village of Silwan was merely a house.When settlers and several members of Israel's Parliament moved inside before dawn, vowing not to leave, the house became one of the devices that the extreme right uses to make clear they will insist on expanding settlements even at the cost of regional peace talks. U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III is coming here next week to help prepare for these talks.
NEWS
By M. Karim Faiez and Henry Chu and M. Karim Faiez and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- At least 28 people, including five Afghan lawmakers and a number of children, were killed yesterday in one of the country's deadliest suicide attacks since the ouster of the Taliban, authorities said. The bomber struck a sugar factory in Baghlan province, north of Kabul, during a visit by a delegation from the lower house of parliament. The legislators, on an economic fact-finding trip, were being greeted by local dignitaries and children at the time. "The explosion happened when the school students were singing songs to welcome the lawmakers to their province," said Zemeri Bashary, a spokesman for the Interior Ministry.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Tina Susman and Chris Kraul and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | April 13, 2007
Baghdad -- An apparent suicide bombing of the tightly guarded parliament building that killed two Sunni Arab legislators and six other people here yesterday struck at the heart of Iraq's struggling democracy and the U.S. security plan that is intended to bolster it. The attack in the parliament's cafeteria, which wounded 23 people, highlighted what many have described as serious gaps in security around the building where legislators elected in December 2005...
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | September 22, 2005
In his eloquent autobiography, Olaudah Equiano describes in gripping detail his boyhood in Africa, his capture by slave traders and the hellish Middle Passage voyage in a slave ship across the Atlantic. The book became a sensation in 18th-century Britain and greatly aided that nation's abolition movement. Two centuries later, it became a classic text in African-American studies, a rare first-person account of the cruelties of slavery. The author is virtually a national hero in Nigeria, the land he claimed as his birthplace.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 2005
DEWSBURY, England - The 100 or so Muslim community leaders who gathered recently at the Taleem Community Center in this northern town no doubt knew Shahid Malik - one of the country's four Muslim members of Parliament - would take a strong line. Just days after the July 7 bombings in London, police identified Mohammad Sidique Khan, a Dewsbury resident and the son-in-law of a prominent community leader, as one of the bombers. The three others came from just up the hill in Leeds. Within hours, top security officials and the press bore down on this largely middle-class community.
NEWS
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 29, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A Shiite member of Iraq's parliament was assassinated yesterday as he made his way from his home to a National Assembly meeting in the capital on the first anniversary of the transfer of power to Iraqi authorities. President Bush marked the anniversary with a speech to a prime-time television audience in the United States, but there was little fanfare in Baghdad. Across Iraq, violence continued unabated. Suicide bombers killed two U.S. soldiers in separate attacks, the U.S. military reported.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 15, 2005
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Former Lebanese prime minister and billionaire construction magnate Rafik Hariri was killed by a powerful car bomb yesterday afternoon as his motorcade wended through a posh seaside neighborhood that he helped erect over the ruins of civil war. The blast shook the ground for miles, chewed a crater three yards deep in the street and swathed luxury hotels and restaurants in thick black smoke. At least nine people died along with Hariri, and more than 135 were wounded. It was unclear who had killed the 60-year-old Hariri or why. He resigned as prime minister last year amid a mounting political battle over Syria's longtime occupation of Lebanon, but remained a member of parliament and had moved toward the anti-Syrian opposition.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | September 28, 1993
MOSCOW -- Only a few days ago they were world leaders, members of the Russian parliament, accorded privilege, rank and authority. Yesterday they were just a bunch of guys standing in the unemployment line, hoping to find work.While their chairman, Ruslan I. Khasbulatov, marched before the television lights and vowed to fight to the end, many members of parliament have decided to face facts."I've been in the Supreme Soviet for three years," said Fyodor D. Polyenov, 64, a trifle sadly. "So probably I'm not qualified for anything anymore."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | September 22, 1993
MOSCOW -- Inside Parliament early today, Russia's vice president tried to seize the nation's presidency while outside surly supporters built barricades and formed defense regiments against attack.President Boris N. Yeltsin drove off to the countryside, ignoring his vice president, Alexander Rutskoi, trying to usurp the presidency. Mr. Yeltsin didn't even bother sending troops to the dismissed but defiant Parliament.Vladimir Shumeiko, a vice premier who had been suspended on charges of corruption, but returned to office yesterday under Mr. Yeltsin's wing, was full of disdain for the members of Parliament.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2004
MOSCOW - Lithuanian President Rolandas Paksas was removed from office yesterday for his support of a businessman with alleged links to Russian organized crime, leaving the Baltic republic in political upheaval on the eve of its entry into the European Union. In a close vote, members of parliament approved the impeachment of the 47-year-old former stunt pilot, who acknowledged "mistakes," but insisted he was a corruption-fighter and victim of "a system that ... is more powerful than you can imagine."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 13, 2004
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's supreme religious leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, refused to intervene yesterday in a confrontation between the conservative and reformist camps after a religious authority barred thousands of pro-reform candidates from running in parliamentary elections. "Once all legal steps have been exhausted, if we arrive at a sensitive situation which demands a decision, there can be no doubt that I will intervene and give my opinion," Khamenei said at a meeting with the country's governor generals, state-run television reported.
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