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NEWS
August 11, 1996
Key votes cast by Maryland's members of Congress will not be published this week because both chambers are in recess.Pub Date: 8/11/96
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
On Tuesday, restaurants and bars in Baltimore and Washington (but mostly Washington) tweeted out discounts, special offers and messages of support for furloughed federal workers. See below for some examples. Among the first restaurants to extend a hand to the furloughed was Range, Bryan Voltaggio's meat-centric restaurant inside Washington's Chevy Chase Pavilion, which offered free cheese pizza to the affected workers. The Tuesday morning tweet read, “free Govt Cheese Pizza w/ID starting today until it's over.” By Wendesday, the offer had been amended.
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NEWS
By Meridian (Miss.) Star | October 24, 1991
WITH ALL the recent talk in Washington about sexual harassment and the need for heightened awareness and stricter laws, one thing has been left unsaid: Laws on the subject do not apply to Congress.Nor do other employment discrimination laws. Nor wage and hour laws. Nor Social Security laws.It isn't that the matter simply slipped the minds of members of Congress. The latest civil rights bill under debate in Congress would also exempt members of Congress and their staffs. So would the pending Family Leave Act, which is designed to guarantee employees unpaid time off from their jobs for circumstances such as childbirth or terminal illness.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
A proposed revision to the federal definition of rape, the first in more than 80 years, would greatly expand the number of crimes reported to the FBI by local law enforcement agencies. The new definition would increase the likelihood that cases in which victims are drugged or are under the influence of alcohol are counted. The definition also would cover cases that include "penetration, no matter how slight" by a body part or an object without the consent of the victim. And it removes specific reference to female victims.
NEWS
By James K. Coyne | August 27, 1991
THE AMERICAN public consistently displays tremendous support for the concept of limiting congressional terms -- nearly 70 percent in the most recent polls. Nevertheless, most members of Congress adamantly oppose the concept. They can't help themselves, because they are addicted to re-election at all costs.The Federalist Papers, written 200 years ago, predicted our modern dilemma: ". . . it is a cause for just uneasiness when we see a legislature legislating for their own interest in opposition to those of the people."
NEWS
By Jonathan Tilove and Jonathan Tilove,Newhouse News Service | January 7, 2007
Washington -- The new Congress includes, for the first time, a Muslim, two Buddhists, more Jews than Episcopalians and the highest-ranking Mormon in congressional history. Roman Catholics remain the largest single faith group in Congress, accounting for 29 percent of all members of the House and Senate, followed by Baptists, Methodists, Presbyterians, Jews and Episcopalians. While Catholics in Congress are nearly 2-to-1 Democrats, the most lopsidedly Democratic groups are Jews and those not affiliated with any religion.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Sparing the Clinton administration for now from having to defend in court the U.S. role in the airstrikes against Yugoslavia, a federal judge dismissed yesterday a constitutional challenge by 31 members of the House.The lawmakers promised an immediate appeal of the decision by U.S. District Judge Paul L. Friedman.In his ruling, Friedman said the courts could not get involved unless Congress and the White House reached "a constitutional impasse" on the use of U.S. armed forces in the Kosovo crisis, and that has not happened.
NEWS
By NANCY E. ROMAN | February 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Congress is about to overreact to media and public disdain for excessive lobbying practices by banning all privately financed congressional travel. This is tantamount to reacting to a drive-by shooting with a federal law disallowing people to drive. Lobbyist Jack Abramoff has pleaded guilty to offenses that deserved to be punished. And Congress is right to place restrictions on lobbying practices. But in a global era, when our relationships with other countries are ever more central to U.S. policy, members of Congress should be traveling more, not less.
NEWS
By CHARLES KOLB | June 19, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Congress responded to the recent corporate accounting, financial and governance scandals by imposing new legal obligations on publicly traded companies. One of the most noted provisions of the 2002 Sarbanes-Oxley legislation requires chief executive officers and chief financial officers to certify quarterly that they have personally reviewed their companies' earnings reports and that the financial information they contain is accurate. These certifications are considered vital in assuring the investing public that they can rely on companies' accurate, transparent reporting before they make important financial decisions.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 6, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Join Congress, see the world. Join a congressman's staff, see more of it. Private groups, corporations or trade associations -- many with legislation that could affect them pending before Congress -- paid nearly $50 million since 2000 to send members of Congress and their staffers on at least 23,000 trips overseas and within the United States, according to a study released yesterday. The trips included at least 200 journeys to Paris and 150 to Hawaii, room rates of up to $500 a night and some high-flying on corporate jets that cost up to $25,000 a trip, according to a report by the Center for Public Integrity, American Public Media and Northwestern University's Medill News Service.
EXPLORE
June 13, 2011
David Crowl, a dairy farmer from Street, was among more than 65 Dairy Farmers of America Inc. board members and young cooperators who visited Capitol Hill last month to discuss issues affecting the dairy industry. DFA members and staff convened in Washington, D.C., for the cooperative's annual D.C. Board Meeting and Hill Visits, where they conducted more than 175 visits with legislators. Crowl met Congressman Roscoe Bartlett, who represents northern Harford County, and his staff and the staffs of Maryland Sens.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,paul.west@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
Is Congress fiddling while America burns? That question might be worth posing to members of Congress, but very few were on hand in Washington at the end of the week to provide answers. Maybe it was superstition, but Congress took Friday the 13th off. The House was not in session. Neither was the Senate. No votes were taken. No action occurred. The seemingly relaxed pace of work is nothing new. A Monday-night-through-Thursday week in Washington frees up time for more politicking back home or fact-finding trips abroad.
NEWS
By Jonathan Tilove and Jonathan Tilove,Newhouse News Service | January 7, 2007
Washington -- The new Congress includes, for the first time, a Muslim, two Buddhists, more Jews than Episcopalians and the highest-ranking Mormon in congressional history. Roman Catholics remain the largest single faith group in Congress, accounting for 29 percent of all members of the House and Senate, followed by Baptists, Methodists, Presbyterians, Jews and Episcopalians. While Catholics in Congress are nearly 2-to-1 Democrats, the most lopsidedly Democratic groups are Jews and those not affiliated with any religion.
NEWS
October 10, 2006
Miserly pay raise insults our troops Last week, I received a call from my 20-year-old granddaughter, who was on a bus heading for an airport in Colorado. She is in the Army and was calling to say goodbye. Her destination is Baghdad. That night, I wondered if President Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney or Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld were losing any sleep worrying about a son, daughter or grandchild who is in danger. Their decisions about the war might be different if they did. The next morning, I looked at The Sun and discovered how much our Congress values these young people who are willing to die or be severely injured serving their country ("OK'd raise for military less than expected," Oct. 6)
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Iraq's prime minister ended his visit to Washington yesterday with a plea for more money, a prod not to abandon his country and a pointed effort to dodge criticism over his comments on the conflict between Israel and Hezbollah. In a speech to a joint session of Congress, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki hewed close to the Bush administration's formulation of the challenges in his homeland, describing Iraq as the "vanguard" of the "war on terror." "I know that some of you here question whether Iraq is part of the war on terror," al-Maliki told lawmakers.
NEWS
By CHARLES KOLB | June 19, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Congress responded to the recent corporate accounting, financial and governance scandals by imposing new legal obligations on publicly traded companies. One of the most noted provisions of the 2002 Sarbanes-Oxley legislation requires chief executive officers and chief financial officers to certify quarterly that they have personally reviewed their companies' earnings reports and that the financial information they contain is accurate. These certifications are considered vital in assuring the investing public that they can rely on companies' accurate, transparent reporting before they make important financial decisions.
NEWS
April 20, 1992
They still don't get it. House Speaker Thomas S. Foley continues to play childish word games about the technical definition of check bouncing. House Minority Whip Newt Gingrich continues to brag about the partisan damage to the Democrats he helped orchestrate while sluffing off as simple "errors" his $26,000 in overdrafts in the House bank. Other House members rush to the microphones to proclaim that no laws were broken. Marylanders, at least, were spared that sorry spectacle. Its delegation was relatively free of the taint.
NEWS
By VICTORIA CLARKE | April 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay may be gone, but Congress' problems are not. It's obvious to everyone outside the coddling confines of the Washington Beltway that Congress' bad image is grounded squarely in the reality of its bad behavior - behavior that, like the image, is shared by Republicans and Democrats alike. Perceptions won't change until the facts do. Cosmetic - or, depending on your perspective, comical - half-measures such as a proposal to ban registered lobbyists from the congressional gym only reinforce the public's accurate sense that legislators live in an alternate ethical universe.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 6, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Join Congress, see the world. Join a congressman's staff, see more of it. Private groups, corporations or trade associations -- many with legislation that could affect them pending before Congress -- paid nearly $50 million since 2000 to send members of Congress and their staffers on at least 23,000 trips overseas and within the United States, according to a study released yesterday. The trips included at least 200 journeys to Paris and 150 to Hawaii, room rates of up to $500 a night and some high-flying on corporate jets that cost up to $25,000 a trip, according to a report by the Center for Public Integrity, American Public Media and Northwestern University's Medill News Service.
NEWS
By VICTORIA CLARKE | April 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay may be gone, but Congress' problems are not. It's obvious to everyone outside the coddling confines of the Washington Beltway that Congress' bad image is grounded squarely in the reality of its bad behavior - behavior that, like the image, is shared by Republicans and Democrats alike. Perceptions won't change until the facts do. Cosmetic - or, depending on your perspective, comical - half-measures such as a proposal to ban registered lobbyists from the congressional gym only reinforce the public's accurate sense that legislators live in an alternate ethical universe.
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