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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The United States stood nearly alone yesterday as it voted against the creation of a new U.N. Human Rights Council, saying the reform did not go far enough to exclude abusers. However, U.S. officials did not carry through on a threat to block the new body's funding, and they pledged to work with other nations to make the council "as strong as it can be." Jan Eliasson, president of the General Assembly, called the vote "a historic moment" as 170 member states backed the new council.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
John W. Dorsey, former chancellor of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who later returned to the classroom where he taught economics, died Monday of respiratory failure at his Laurel home. He was 78. "Many believe that he saved UMBC from several alternative fates, from absorption to closure, and set it onto the sound course that leads to today," said Joseph N. Tatarewicz, an associate professor of history at UMBC and director of the university's human context of science and technology program.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 2003
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- It will be much less than a United States of Europe. But it will be more than the distillation of five decades of treaties into one document. For 16 months, Europe's most important and exclusive club has struggled to draft its first constitution. The process has been awkward and unpredictable, ambitious and timid, as delegates from the 15 member nations of the European Union and the 10 that are to join next year fight to protect their countries' national interests even as they agree to cede bits of sovereignty.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Baltimore County Council members rejected state funding Monday for a planned low-income housing development in Rosedale, passing a resolution expressing disapproval of the project. In a 6-0 vote, with Councilman Kenneth Oliver abstaining, council members turned down more than $1 million in funding from the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development for a project planned by the nonprofit Homes for America. "Baltimore County is becoming poorer and poorer, and a lot of people can't afford high-end housing," said Oliver, a Randallstown Democrat, after the council meeting.
NEWS
By Samuel F. Wells Jr | June 7, 2005
WITH THE strong rejection of the European Union constitutional treaty by two founding member states last week, the effort to strengthen the integration of the 25-member union appears deadlocked. Many commentators claim that further integration is impossible, expansion to new states foreclosed and the security of the euro currency system threatened. While it may prove impossible for this constitutional treaty to be saved, the heads of government have some important issues to consider when they gather for a summit as the European Council on June 16 in Brussels.
NEWS
By Karl F. Inderfurth | September 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - The leaders of 175 countries, including President Bush, will gather at the United Nations this week for a world summit intended to reform and reinvigorate the world organization to meet the threats and challenges of the new century. The occasion also should provide the leaders with the opportunity to address what has long been considered an Achilles heel of the international body, U.N. peacekeeping, which needs to be strengthened, not placed on the back burner. The recent report of a congressionally mandated task force on the United Nations, chaired by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and former Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, states that peacekeeping is "arguably, the most important U.N. activity designed to prevent and end conflict and build stable societies."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | May 29, 2002
We all know that the world has been transformed dramatically in recent months and years, with terrorist attacks against the United States, the demise of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War among the agents of change. Even so, Russia's becoming part of NATO, even if just a junior partner, seems truly extraordinary. NATO - the North Atlantic Treaty Organization - was formed in 1949 expressly as an anti-Soviet alliance, set up to keep the Soviet Union at bay and prevent it from attacking its non-Communist neighbors in Europe.
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | May 13, 1991
Washington -- Not so long ago, it seemed to many that Britain's Margaret Thatcher was the principal obstacle to construction of a federal union of the European Community's 12 member states. In Brussels today, those must seem like the good old days.This is a time of trouble for the community. The Gulf War was the first test of its capacity to forge a common foreign and military policy. It flunked. The very effort revealed that there is no common European diplomacy or military policy because there are no foreign-policy views shared by all members.
NEWS
By New York Times | July 15, 1991
Representatives of 12 states -- including Maryland -- and the District of Columbia will meet tomorrow to consider adopting California's stringent rules requiring additional anti-pollution equipment for gasoline-powered cars and trucks.Eight of the states are on record in favor of the change, and it is likely that at least some of the others will go along.Proponents of the standards say they will result in cleaner air fromVirginia to Maine. As each state signs on, they contend, it cleans its own air and helps that of its neighbors.
NEWS
August 25, 2006
Ehrlich's petty ploy to revive slots plan I find it astounding that Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is now arguing that we must have slot machine gambling to cover the costs of the population growth that will be caused by the base realignment process ("Ehrlich sees slots in '07," Aug. 20). Wasn't it Mr. Ehrlich who boasted that the process would be good for Maryland, bringing both jobs and tax revenues? Yet he now appears to be arguing that this influx will be so costly for Maryland that we will need to resort to scamming quarters from our seniors and sucking dollars out of our poorest neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
Prosecutors dropped charges Monday against Ryan Marcus Coleman, a former City College administrator accused of sexually abusing a 17-year-old student, saying they lacked sufficient evidence to take the case to trial. Coleman, 36, was charged in July 2010 with sex abuse of a minor, fourth-degree sex offense and second-degree assault. Assistant state's attorneys Michael Leedy and Katherine Smeltzer dropped all of those charges in Baltimore Circuit Court just before jury selection and a trial were slated to begin.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | January 24, 2012
Reps. Roscoe G. Bartlett and Chris Van Hollen are planning to take service members past and present to President Barack Obama's State of the Union Address Tuesday evening. Bartlett, a Western Maryland Republican, and Van Hollen, a Montgomery County Democrat, are among some two dozen lawmakers participating in the bipartisan effort organized by the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs and the House National Guard and Reserve Components Caucus to help focus attention on veterans' needs.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2011
The Anne Arundel County Board of Education has asked the state to dismiss county Executive John R. Leopold's request to exempt the county from state-mandated education funding requirements, officials said on Monday. In March, Leopold formerly requested that the State Board of Education grant the county a waiver request from maintenance of effort, a state requirement that counties spend at least as much per pupil to educate county students the upcoming school year as it did the previous year.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 22, 2010
Members of Maryland's slots panel, worried that neighboring states are enhancing their casinos, recommended Friday that lawmakers allow table games like blackjack and poker at the five slots locations voters have approved. "It is apparent we are well behind the curve," said Commissioner D. Bruce Poole at a slots commission meeting Friday. "We are running catch-up with other states." The commission's decision came hours after a key vote by Delaware lawmakers to allow dice and card games at their gaming facilities.
NEWS
August 25, 2006
Ehrlich's petty ploy to revive slots plan I find it astounding that Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is now arguing that we must have slot machine gambling to cover the costs of the population growth that will be caused by the base realignment process ("Ehrlich sees slots in '07," Aug. 20). Wasn't it Mr. Ehrlich who boasted that the process would be good for Maryland, bringing both jobs and tax revenues? Yet he now appears to be arguing that this influx will be so costly for Maryland that we will need to resort to scamming quarters from our seniors and sucking dollars out of our poorest neighborhoods.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
Charles R. Boutin, a member of the Public Service Commission, apologized yesterday for using his state computer account to exchange sexually oriented e-mails with a prostitute. In a written statement, Boutin, 64, a former Republican delegate who was appointed to the commission last year by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., acknowledged that his conduct was "morally wrong and I am ashamed and deeply sorry." Boutin's admission was made as the Harford County Sheriff's Office said it intended to release thousands of e-mails and documents it obtained as part of its criminal investigation into Valerie Fletcher, a Baltimore County woman who pleaded guilty last month to one count of prostitution.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 15, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III embarks this weekend on a new series of consultations to draw support for a U.N. resolution authorizing the use of military force, if necessary, to drive Iraq from Kuwait.The effort comes amid continued division even among coalition partners over whether United Nations sanctions can work and how long to give them, and over when and how to go to war if they fail.The State Department said yesterday Mr. Baker would be meeting the foreign ministers of Zaire, Ethiopia and the Ivory Coast in Geneva Saturday after sessions with the European Community tomorrow in Brussels, Belgium.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 15, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III embarks this weekend on a new series of consultations to draw support for a U.N. resolution authorizing the use of military force, if necessary, to drive Iraq from Kuwait.The effort comes amid continued division even among coalition partners over whether United Nations sanctions can work and how long to give them, and over when and how to go to war if they fail.The State Department said yesterday Mr. Baker would be meeting the foreign ministers of Zaire, Ethiopia and the Ivory Coast in Geneva Saturday after sessions with the European Community tomorrow in Brussels, Belgium.
NEWS
By TOM LANTOS | March 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Our country did violence to the legacy of Eleanor Roosevelt last week. She chaired the nascent U.N. Human Rights Commission and was the driving force behind the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. At one point during the drafting process in 1948, Mrs. Roosevelt wrote about a procedural dispute: "The government of the United States had never, of course, been opposed to writing a convention; it simply felt that the attempt would not be practical in these early stages. When it was found that feeling ran high on this subject, we immediately cooperated."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The United States stood nearly alone yesterday as it voted against the creation of a new U.N. Human Rights Council, saying the reform did not go far enough to exclude abusers. However, U.S. officials did not carry through on a threat to block the new body's funding, and they pledged to work with other nations to make the council "as strong as it can be." Jan Eliasson, president of the General Assembly, called the vote "a historic moment" as 170 member states backed the new council.
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