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NEWS
June 7, 2000
Lt. Gen. R. H. D. Rogers, 78, a highly decorated airman who rose through the ranks to become the chief of staff of South Africa's air force, died of cancer Sunday in Cape Town. General Rogers had been a member of parliament for the opposition Democratic Party until his retirement in 1994.
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NEWS
August 17, 2011
We should learn the lessons of the London riots, as the root causes can also be found in Baltimore. The real reason why British youth loots is simply because they are following the example shown to them by the establishment. Young Brits are immersed in a culture where looting has become a way of life which has been highly rewarding to those at the top. The bankers have looted the tax-payers, the members of Parliament have looted their expense allowances, and "celebrity culture" has looted the moral seed bank of the nation.
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NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 19, 2006
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- The transitional president of Somalia narrowly escaped assassination yesterday when a car bomb exploded as he left a converted grain silo that serves as the nation's makeshift parliament. President Abdullahi Yusuf was unharmed. However, eight people, including his brother and several security guards, were killed by the blast in Baidoa, the nation's provisional capital. The attack marked the second-consecutive day of bloodshed in the Horn of Africa nation, which has been without a functioning government since 1991.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 30, 2008
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A suicide bomber and gunmen attacked a drug-eradication team in eastern Afghanistan yesterday, killing at least 19 people and injuring more than 40, authorities said. Twelve police officers were among the dead in the assault, the latest in a string of attacks by militants against government teams responsible for destroying the lucrative opium poppy crop during the planting season. The insurgency is fueled with profits from the drug trade. The seven other people killed were civilians, the Interior Ministry said in a statement.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 30, 1995
LONDON -- So, maybe Brian Sedgemore got carried away when he wrote "The Insider's Guide to Parliament."A Labor member of Parliament, and far from the center of power, Mr. Sedgemore chose to detail the sex scandals, the money-grubbing and the perks that have come to seem a permanent part of the world's most hallowed debating chambers. But did he have to get so personal in the book?Mr. Sedgemore called a Conservative minister, Virginia Bottomley, "beautiful but sexless." He also dismissed the Chancellor of the Exchequer with a word -- "fat" -- and claimed that Labor's leader, Tony Blair, "hijacked a political party in the pursuit of personal power."
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 6, 2007
London -- A joyous reception for 15 British sailors and marines freed from Iran quickly turned to hard questioning yesterday about the British military's handling of the event and the ready confessions the Britons offered to their Iranian captors. The 14 men and one woman had scarcely settled down at a marine base in Devon when politicians began calling for inquiries into how the crews of two small patrol boats had found themselves lightly armed, without escort and far from their ship in disputed waters in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2004
MADRID, Spain - Spain's new prime minister, Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, was sworn in yesterday by King Juan Carlos, setting the country on a new path of sweeping foreign policy and domestic changes. Zapatero, 43, a Socialist, succeeds a pro-American right-wing leadership that has left the nation more prosperous but has also angered many Spaniards over its authoritarian style. The new prime minister, a lawyer and longtime member of parliament, has been praised, even by his critics, for his mild manner and his inclusive, conciliatory approach.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 24, 1992
BANGKOK, Thailand -- The Thai monarch issued a general amnesty yesterday to government leaders and military officers involved in the brutal suppression of last week's anti-government demonstrations amid signs that Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon was preparing to resign and possibly flee the country.General Suchinda, who tenaciously clung to power for six weeks despite popular demands that he resign, spent the day yesterday negotiating his departure from the job.Deputy Prime Minister Meechai Ruchupan said General Suchinda had told him that he would quit after seeing King Bhumibol Adulyadej to resolve the crisis.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 30, 2008
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A suicide bomber and gunmen attacked a drug-eradication team in eastern Afghanistan yesterday, killing at least 19 people and injuring more than 40, authorities said. Twelve police officers were among the dead in the assault, the latest in a string of attacks by militants against government teams responsible for destroying the lucrative opium poppy crop during the planting season. The insurgency is fueled with profits from the drug trade. The seven other people killed were civilians, the Interior Ministry said in a statement.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | November 24, 1992
LONDON -- The fire is out in Windsor Castle, but the effects of it still smolder as the public and politicians divide over who is going to pay to have the royal fortress restored.Peter Brooke, the heritage secretary, threw more fuel on the controversy when he repeated yesterday before the House of Commons that the government would pick up the cost of restoration."Windsor Castle is the property of the state, and it is the government's responsibility to ensure that resources are provided to maintain it in a manner commensurate with its status," he told the chamber.
NEWS
By M. Karim Faiez and Henry Chu and M. Karim Faiez and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- At least 28 people, including five Afghan lawmakers and a number of children, were killed yesterday in one of the country's deadliest suicide attacks since the ouster of the Taliban, authorities said. The bomber struck a sugar factory in Baghlan province, north of Kabul, during a visit by a delegation from the lower house of parliament. The legislators, on an economic fact-finding trip, were being greeted by local dignitaries and children at the time. "The explosion happened when the school students were singing songs to welcome the lawmakers to their province," said Zemeri Bashary, a spokesman for the Interior Ministry.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 6, 2007
London -- A joyous reception for 15 British sailors and marines freed from Iran quickly turned to hard questioning yesterday about the British military's handling of the event and the ready confessions the Britons offered to their Iranian captors. The 14 men and one woman had scarcely settled down at a marine base in Devon when politicians began calling for inquiries into how the crews of two small patrol boats had found themselves lightly armed, without escort and far from their ship in disputed waters in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 19, 2006
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- The transitional president of Somalia narrowly escaped assassination yesterday when a car bomb exploded as he left a converted grain silo that serves as the nation's makeshift parliament. President Abdullahi Yusuf was unharmed. However, eight people, including his brother and several security guards, were killed by the blast in Baidoa, the nation's provisional capital. The attack marked the second-consecutive day of bloodshed in the Horn of Africa nation, which has been without a functioning government since 1991.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 2005
DEWSBURY, England - The 100 or so Muslim community leaders who gathered recently at the Taleem Community Center in this northern town no doubt knew Shahid Malik - one of the country's four Muslim members of Parliament - would take a strong line. Just days after the July 7 bombings in London, police identified Mohammad Sidique Khan, a Dewsbury resident and the son-in-law of a prominent community leader, as one of the bombers. The three others came from just up the hill in Leeds. Within hours, top security officials and the press bore down on this largely middle-class community.
NEWS
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 29, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A Shiite member of Iraq's parliament was assassinated yesterday as he made his way from his home to a National Assembly meeting in the capital on the first anniversary of the transfer of power to Iraqi authorities. President Bush marked the anniversary with a speech to a prime-time television audience in the United States, but there was little fanfare in Baghdad. Across Iraq, violence continued unabated. Suicide bombers killed two U.S. soldiers in separate attacks, the U.S. military reported.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 15, 2005
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Former Lebanese prime minister and billionaire construction magnate Rafik Hariri was killed by a powerful car bomb yesterday afternoon as his motorcade wended through a posh seaside neighborhood that he helped erect over the ruins of civil war. The blast shook the ground for miles, chewed a crater three yards deep in the street and swathed luxury hotels and restaurants in thick black smoke. At least nine people died along with Hariri, and more than 135 were wounded. It was unclear who had killed the 60-year-old Hariri or why. He resigned as prime minister last year amid a mounting political battle over Syria's longtime occupation of Lebanon, but remained a member of parliament and had moved toward the anti-Syrian opposition.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 29, 2001
KIEV, Ukraine - With Russia expectantly standing by, Ukraine is looking forward to 11 months of debilitating political turmoil after a vengeful coalition of business tycoons and Communists last week forced out the popular reformist prime minister. This country of 49 million once cherished its friendly relations with the West. Some of Viktor Yushchenko's allies believe that his departure from the government, almost a full year before parliamentary elections, leaves little to keep Ukraine from slipping inexorably back into Moscow's orbit.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 2004
KIEV, Ukraine - For two weeks the enormous crowds swirling through central Kiev shouted and marched until the government agreed to a new presidential runoff. But yesterday afternoon, the streets grew quieter as protesters braced themselves for what they believe will be an anxious wait until the new vote on Dec. 26. Many of the protesters supporting the opposition candidate Viktor A. Yushchenko say they will stay in their tents pitched in the streets and continue their blockade until the government adopts measures to ensure that the vote is fair.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 2004
KIEV, Ukraine - For two weeks the enormous crowds swirling through central Kiev shouted and marched until the government agreed to a new presidential runoff. But yesterday afternoon, the streets grew quieter as protesters braced themselves for what they believe will be an anxious wait until the new vote on Dec. 26. Many of the protesters supporting the opposition candidate Viktor A. Yushchenko say they will stay in their tents pitched in the streets and continue their blockade until the government adopts measures to ensure that the vote is fair.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2004
MADRID, Spain - Spain's new prime minister, Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, was sworn in yesterday by King Juan Carlos, setting the country on a new path of sweeping foreign policy and domestic changes. Zapatero, 43, a Socialist, succeeds a pro-American right-wing leadership that has left the nation more prosperous but has also angered many Spaniards over its authoritarian style. The new prime minister, a lawyer and longtime member of parliament, has been praised, even by his critics, for his mild manner and his inclusive, conciliatory approach.
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