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By New York Times News Service | December 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Carroll Hubbard Jr., a former member of the House of Representatives from Kentucky, served as an informer for the FBI for about six months this year while trying to avoid prosecution on charges related to his use of campaign contributions, the Justice Department said Saturday.FBI spokesman Carl Stern said that the investigation of Mr. Hubbard was continuing but that the former member of Congress was no longer working for the bureau.Mr. Hubbard's role as an informer was disclosed yesterday in the Washington Post, which said that he concluded he had no choice but to cooperate with the bureau after finding himself the target of a federal investigation into his use of campaign money.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
On Tuesday, restaurants and bars in Baltimore and Washington (but mostly Washington) tweeted out discounts, special offers and messages of support for furloughed federal workers. See below for some examples. Among the first restaurants to extend a hand to the furloughed was Range, Bryan Voltaggio's meat-centric restaurant inside Washington's Chevy Chase Pavilion, which offered free cheese pizza to the affected workers. The Tuesday morning tweet read, “free Govt Cheese Pizza w/ID starting today until it's over.” By Wendesday, the offer had been amended.
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NEWS
By ROBERT S. BENNETT | July 4, 1993
Washington. -- Even though it is not mentioned in the United States Constitution, there can be little doubt that constituent service by members of Congress is a valuable part of our system.This is particularly true because in this country we have a large and powerful bureaucracy which is capable of arbitrary conduct and non-responsiveness to legitimate concerns.In addition to checking into bureaucratic abuses in individual cases, members of Congress performing constituent services may learn about problems which make them better qualified to carry out their primary work of oversight and legislation.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
A proposed revision to the federal definition of rape, the first in more than 80 years, would greatly expand the number of crimes reported to the FBI by local law enforcement agencies. The new definition would increase the likelihood that cases in which victims are drugged or are under the influence of alcohol are counted. The definition also would cover cases that include "penetration, no matter how slight" by a body part or an object without the consent of the victim. And it removes specific reference to female victims.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | December 29, 2005
I don't make $1 million a year, but I think every member of Congress should be paid at least that much. It's not because those turkeys in Washington deserve it. It's because we deserve a lot better people than we have in Congress. The cost of paying every member of Congress $1 million a year is absolutely trivial compared with the vast amounts of the taxpayers' money wasted by cheap politicians doing things to get themselves re-elected. You could pay every member of Congress $1 million a year for a century for less money than it costs to run the Agriculture Department for one year.
NEWS
By Dan Clawson & Alan Neustadtl | January 20, 1993
If we want to restore democracy, the most important reform i eliminating the influence of money on politics. As long as money talks, campaign contributions will have far more influence than ordinary voters. But many of the reform proposals being discussed would do little or nothing to limit the clout of big money contributors in fact, they arent even intended to do so. Meaningful reform depends on understanding how campaign finance works today, and especially the influence of Political Action Committees, or PACs.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | August 6, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The effort in Congress to rewrite the law allowing for special federal prosecutors began yesterday, but with a proposal that may help doom the whole idea.In the new bill, offered in the Senate, future special prosecutors who probe high-level government scandal would have clear-cut, wide authority to go after members of Congress who may have violated federal law -- a proposal that many lawmakers have feared.None of the 11 special prosecutors named under the law since its initial adoption in 1978 has ever investigated a member of Congress; all of those probed, prosecuted, or convicted have been members of the executive branch.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 12, 1990
Four weeks before the midterm elections, the American public is in adiscontented mood, with 60 percent saying they disapprove of the way Congress is doing its job and more than two-thirds saying it is time to replace most members of Congress, a New York Times/CBS News Poll has found.But people still looked more kindly on their own member of Congress than on Congress in general, and the forces protecting incumbent House members are formidable -- from superior war chests to the perquisites of office.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 18, 2008
I think George W. Bush deserves a raise. You're waiting for the punch line, I know. You're figuring with a setup like that, about a president whose popularity lives down where moles and earthworms do, the payoff's got to be a doozy. Sorry, but there is no punch line because that wasn't a setup. I think the president should get a raise. Congress, too. And yes, I know Congress' approval ratings are similarly subterranean. But see, the argument I'm making has nothing to do with this individual president or Congress.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- When Rep. Kweisi Mfume resigns from Congress Sunday to head the NAACP, he will retain control of as much as $188,000 in leftover campaign funds -- money he could use to help erase the organization's $3.2 million debt, to bolster the campaigns of other politicians or to help finance a possible return to politics.Mr. Mfume is the second Marylander to leave Capitol Hill in the past year with a substantial campaign kitty. Helen Delich Bentley had nearly $42,000 when she left the House in January 1995 to pursue an unsuccessful bid for the Republican nomination for governor.
EXPLORE
June 13, 2011
David Crowl, a dairy farmer from Street, was among more than 65 Dairy Farmers of America Inc. board members and young cooperators who visited Capitol Hill last month to discuss issues affecting the dairy industry. DFA members and staff convened in Washington, D.C., for the cooperative's annual D.C. Board Meeting and Hill Visits, where they conducted more than 175 visits with legislators. Crowl met Congressman Roscoe Bartlett, who represents northern Harford County, and his staff and the staffs of Maryland Sens.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 18, 2008
I think George W. Bush deserves a raise. You're waiting for the punch line, I know. You're figuring with a setup like that, about a president whose popularity lives down where moles and earthworms do, the payoff's got to be a doozy. Sorry, but there is no punch line because that wasn't a setup. I think the president should get a raise. Congress, too. And yes, I know Congress' approval ratings are similarly subterranean. But see, the argument I'm making has nothing to do with this individual president or Congress.
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Iraq's prime minister ended his visit to Washington yesterday with a plea for more money, a prod not to abandon his country and a pointed effort to dodge criticism over his comments on the conflict between Israel and Hezbollah. In a speech to a joint session of Congress, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki hewed close to the Bush administration's formulation of the challenges in his homeland, describing Iraq as the "vanguard" of the "war on terror." "I know that some of you here question whether Iraq is part of the war on terror," al-Maliki told lawmakers.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | December 29, 2005
I don't make $1 million a year, but I think every member of Congress should be paid at least that much. It's not because those turkeys in Washington deserve it. It's because we deserve a lot better people than we have in Congress. The cost of paying every member of Congress $1 million a year is absolutely trivial compared with the vast amounts of the taxpayers' money wasted by cheap politicians doing things to get themselves re-elected. You could pay every member of Congress $1 million a year for a century for less money than it costs to run the Agriculture Department for one year.
NEWS
By RICHARD SIMON and RICHARD SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Oil industry executives summoned to Capitol Hill are expected to receive a grilling this week - perhaps unlike any they have received before - about their record profits at a time of high oil prices. But the questions won't just be coming from the usual critics. Some of the industry's traditional Republican allies are eager to show that they, too, share their constituents' anger over high prices and record profits. The hearing, ordered by Senate Republican leader Bill Frist of Tennessee, illustrates the political pressure that is driving Republicans to make a show of getting tough on an industry that has been a major source of GOP cash.
NEWS
By Chuck Neubauer and Chuck Neubauer,Los Angeles Times | September 25, 2005
WASHINGTON // A watchdog group, naming what it calls "the 13 most corrupt members of Congress," is calling for ethics investigations of some of the most prominent political leaders on Capitol Hill in a report to be released tomorrow. Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) claims in its report that the 13 members, among them Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist and House Majority Whip Roy Blunt, violated a variety of congressional ethics rules. The bipartisan list includes California GOP Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham, one of two House members whose residences have been searched as part of separate federal criminal investigations.
NEWS
By DAVID MASON | July 3, 1992
Washington. -- How much do you think your own senator or congressman is worth? Perhaps more important, how much does he think he's worth?Based on the congressional budget, nearly $6 million.To understand what's wrong with the Imperial Congress, it's essential to examine the budget of the royal household. However, the Legislative Appropriations Bill, which funds most of Congress's expenses, is arcane and deliberately confusing. To find out how much one committee spends, for example, you have to examine five different accounts.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | January 14, 1991
After voting to authorize the use of force in the Persian Gulf, Rep. Helen D. Bentley went to a meeting in Harford County and encountered a dozen relatives of troops in Saudi Arabia.These families stand to lose more than most if President Bush exercises the authority Congress gave him Saturday. But none of the people gathered at the Joppa-Magnolia Fire Department condemned Bentley, R-2nd."They all thanked me for my vote," she said yesterday.So far, several Maryland members of Congress say they're finding support and understanding from the public, even people who oppose the use of force.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw, Robert Little and Matthew Hay Brown and Gwyneth K. Shaw, Robert Little and Matthew Hay Brown,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 16, 2005
In the waiting room of the West Jefferson Medical Center - one of only three operating hospitals in the New Orleans area - people jeered when President Bush came on the television last night, standing in the city's famous Jackson Square. When the president praised rescue workers for bringing food to victims of Hurricane Katrina, a man in a wheelchair stood and shouted, "What about medication?" Four members of the Krummel family, all of them residents of the city's West Bank - and all in varying degrees of homelessness since the storm swept through - watched as they waited for news about their father, in the hospital for a heart condition.
NEWS
By Steven Bodzin and Steven Bodzin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - In an apparent response to congressional charges that it was ignoring methamphetamine abuse, three high-level Bush administration officials went to a Tennessee drug court yesterday to offer "innovative solutions" to combat a problem that has spread rapidly across the country. "The scourge of methamphetamine demands unconventional thinking and innovative solutions to fight the devastation it leaves behind," said Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales. "I have directed U.S. attorneys to make prosecution of methamphetamine-related crimes a top priority and seek the harshest penalties."
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