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Melvin Williams

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By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1999
Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams, a drug dealer who revolutionized Baltimore's heroin culture three decades ago and who was recently released from federal prison, was arrested Monday night on charges that he assaulted a 37-year-old man in Southwest Baltimore.Williams, 57, was charged yesterday in the Monday night incident. He faces trial on charges of first-degree assault, possession of a handgun, false imprisonment and reckless endangerment. Williams, of the 8600 block of Winands Road in Randallstown, was released on $50,000 bond.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Baltimore police shot and killed a man they say fought with police before producing a gun in an East Baltimore housing project Wednesday night. Deputy Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said officers chased the man on foot into the 200 block of N. Spring Court, inside the Douglass Homes community, before 7 p.m. He was later pronounced dead at a hospital, and police could not immediately confirm his age or identity. Rodriguez said officers from the department's special enforcement section were in the Douglass Homes area, working on "intelligence" they had gathered that led them to believe a suspect was about to commit a crime near or in a local business.
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NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Gail Gibson and Sara Neufeld and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2003
Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams, considered one of the worst drug lords in Baltimore history, returned to prison yesterday while a federal judge deliberates whether to release him early. But even if U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis rules against Williams, "we're almost home anyway," defense attorney Michael E. Marr said after court yesterday. The parole board has determined that Williams is eligible for release in September, and Marr said he is optimistic that his client will be released to a halfway house before then.
NEWS
May 7, 2003
On May 1, 2003, NAOMI F. WILLIAMS; mother of James and Melvin Williams. Funeral Service at Concord Baptist Church, Thursday, May 8th, Wake 10 A.M., Service 11 A.M. Arrangements by Millers Metropolitan Chapel.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
To the dismay of prosecutors, a man considered to be one of the worst drug lords in Baltimore history was freed yesterday of what had been a 22-year sentence for a gun crime and vowed as he walked away from the city's federal courthouse to dedicate his life to serving God. Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams, 61, served nearly four years on a handgun possession conviction before his attorney successfully argued that Williams did not meet the technical requirements...
NEWS
May 7, 2003
On May 1, 2003, NAOMI F. WILLIAMS; mother of James and Melvin Williams. Funeral Service at Concord Baptist Church, Thursday, May 8th, Wake 10 A.M., Service 11 A.M. Arrangements by Millers Metropolitan Chapel.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and William Talbott and Frank D. Roylance and William Talbott,Evening Sun Staff | September 14, 1990
Police have charged a 27-year-old northwest Baltimore man with the strangulation death last month of Donald A. Williams, whose nude body was found near the 10th tee of Forest Park Golf Course.Williams, 29, of the 2800 block of Norfolk Ave., was the son of convicted Baltimore drug kingpin "Little Melvin" Williams, who is now in a federal prison in Minnesota.Police said yesterday they arrested Terry Copeland at his home in the 5000 block of Hampshire Ave., just a block and a half from the course's 10th tee.Copeland was charged with first-degree murder and robbery and held at the Central District lockup pending a bail review hearing today.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and William Talbott and Frank D. Roylance and William Talbott,Evening Sun Staff | September 13, 1990
Baltimore police have charged a 27-year-old northwest Baltimore man with the strangulation death last month of Donald A. Williams, whose nude body was found near the 10th tee of Forest Park Golf Course.Williams, 29, of the 2800 block of Norfolk Ave., was the son of convicted Baltimore drug kingpin "Little Melvin" Williams, who is now in a federal prison in Minnesota.Police said today they arrested Terry Copeland at his home in the 5000 block of Hampshire Ave., just a block and a half from the course's 10th tee.Copeland was charged with first-degree murder and robbery and held at the Central District lockup pending a bail review hearing today.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2003
A federal judge who abruptly released Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams in January from what had been a 22-year prison sentence for a gun crime now says the man considered to be one of the worst drug lords in Baltimore history must remain jailed on an old parole violation. Saying he would release Williams again if he had "legal authority to do so," U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis ruled this week that Williams was not unfairly detained on the parole charge and must complete his jail term for that violation.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 22, 1999
The retrial on a federal handgun charge of Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams -- who once presided over a heroin-dealing empire that employed 200 street-level dealers -- began yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore with brief opening statements by a prosecutor and Williams' lawyer.Williams' first trial on the charge of felony possession of a firearm ended in September in a mistrial when jurors were unable to reach a verdict.Assistant U.S. Attorney James M. Webster III told the jury of nine women and three men that Williams in March repeatedly "pistol-whipped" a man on a southwest Baltimore street corner over a $500 debt.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2003
A federal judge who abruptly released Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams in January from what had been a 22-year prison sentence for a gun crime now says the man considered to be one of the worst drug lords in Baltimore history must remain jailed on an old parole violation. Saying he would release Williams again if he had "legal authority to do so," U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis ruled this week that Williams was not unfairly detained on the parole charge and must complete his jail term for that violation.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Gail Gibson and Sara Neufeld and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2003
Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams, considered one of the worst drug lords in Baltimore history, returned to prison yesterday while a federal judge deliberates whether to release him early. But even if U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis rules against Williams, "we're almost home anyway," defense attorney Michael E. Marr said after court yesterday. The parole board has determined that Williams is eligible for release in September, and Marr said he is optimistic that his client will be released to a halfway house before then.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2003
When a federal judge abruptly released Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams in January from what had been a 22-year prison sentence, the breath of freedom for the man considered to be one of the worst drug lords in Baltimore history turned out to be a short one. Less than 24 hours after Williams walked out of U.S. District Court in Baltimore a free man, the U.S. Marshals Service picked him up on an old parole violation warrant, and the 61-year-old ex-convict who...
NEWS
By David Simon | July 27, 2001
IT'S A CERTAIN nostalgia that has me hoping Gary Condit will slip the bonds of scandal and emerge with life, liberty and his political career intact. It has nothing to do with the congressman per se; for me, Mr. Condit stands only as an abstraction, the headline du jour, if you will. And while I might hope against hope for the safe return of intern Chandra Levy, my real interest is among the supporting cast. I'm rooting for Abbe D. Lowell. The name should be familiar to anyone following this scandal, or the Clintonian eruption that preceded it, or any number of instances in which a public man has been compelled to fight for squirm-room amid media frenzy.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 7, 2000
IN A MOVE NOTICED by absolutely no one running for president of the United States, the federal government last week sent Melvin D. Williams, formerly known as "Little Melvin," formerly one of the biggest drug traffickers in Baltimore, back to a life in prison. The charge this time involved illegal possession of a handgun. The government said Melvin used it to pistol-whip a guy in West Baltimore during a dispute over a $500 debt on a bail bond policy. This shows how out of touch Melvin had gotten during his previous 12-year stay in prison.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2000
Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams -- one of the biggest drug lords in Baltimore history -- was sentenced yesterday to nearly 22 years in prison after a federal prosecutor denounced him as living a life of "constant criminal behavior." Williams, 58, received the lengthy no-parole sentence in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, where he was prosecuted under the federal government's Armed Career Criminal statute. The law provides stiff sentences for any criminal with multiple convictions for drug trafficking or felony crimes of violence.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 7, 2000
IN A MOVE NOTICED by absolutely no one running for president of the United States, the federal government last week sent Melvin D. Williams, formerly known as "Little Melvin," formerly one of the biggest drug traffickers in Baltimore, back to a life in prison. The charge this time involved illegal possession of a handgun. The government said Melvin used it to pistol-whip a guy in West Baltimore during a dispute over a $500 debt on a bail bond policy. This shows how out of touch Melvin had gotten during his previous 12-year stay in prison.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2000
Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams -- one of the biggest drug lords in Baltimore history -- was sentenced yesterday to nearly 22 years in prison after a federal prosecutor denounced him as living a life of "constant criminal behavior." Williams, 58, received the lengthy no-parole sentence in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, where he was prosecuted under the federal government's Armed Career Criminal statute. The law provides stiff sentences for any criminal with multiple convictions for drug trafficking or felony crimes of violence.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams -- who once dominated the city's heroin trade with an organization that employed more than 200 street-level dealers -- was convicted yesterday by a federal court jury in Baltimore of felony possession of a handgun.The conviction carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 15 years in prison. In addition, Williams, 58, could face additional time for violating his parole from a mid-1980s federal heroin trafficking sentence.Williams was first tried on the charge in September, but that trial ended in a mistrial when jurors deadlocked on a verdict.
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