Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMelvin Franklin
IN THE NEWS

Melvin Franklin

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 25, 1995
Melvin Franklin, 52, an original member of the Temptations whose deep voice anchored the harmonies on such hits as "The Way You Do the Things You Do" and "My Girl," died Thursday in Los Angeles after a series of seizures. Born David English, he sang with the Elgins, later called the Primes, who began recording for Detroit's Motown Records in 1960. Two years later, the group reformed as the Temptations.The group, which for much of its heyday featured Franklin, Otis Williams, Eddie Kendricks, Paul Williams and David Ruffin, recorded 43 Top 10 singles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 31, 1998
It's got a nice beat, and you can dance to it.That's the way the teen guests on "American Bandstand" used to review records, and maybe that's the way we should review made-for-TV miniseries like "The Temptations," airing for four hours tomorrow and Monday nights on NBC."The Temptations" is the Hollywood version of the story of the famed and troubled Motown singing group that scored its first hit in 1964. For 10 points, baby boomers, can you name the tune?In the film, founder Otis Williams (Charles Malik Whitfield)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 31, 1998
It's got a nice beat, and you can dance to it.That's the way the teen guests on "American Bandstand" used to review records, and maybe that's the way we should review made-for-TV miniseries like "The Temptations," airing for four hours tomorrow and Monday nights on NBC."The Temptations" is the Hollywood version of the story of the famed and troubled Motown singing group that scored its first hit in 1964. For 10 points, baby boomers, can you name the tune?In the film, founder Otis Williams (Charles Malik Whitfield)
NEWS
February 25, 1995
Melvin Franklin, 52, an original member of the Temptations whose deep voice anchored the harmonies on such hits as "The Way You Do the Things You Do" and "My Girl," died Thursday in Los Angeles after a series of seizures. Born David English, he sang with the Elgins, later called the Primes, who began recording for Detroit's Motown Records in 1960. Two years later, the group reformed as the Temptations.The group, which for much of its heyday featured Franklin, Otis Williams, Eddie Kendricks, Paul Williams and David Ruffin, recorded 43 Top 10 singles.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 6, 1992
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -- Eddie Kendricks, whose soaring falsetto was one of the signatures of the Temptations' remarkable vocal versatility, has died at age 52.Mr. Kendricks was a founding member and lead singer of the singing group that played such an integral role in the early history of Motown Records.A spokeswoman for Baptist Medical Center-Princeton said the singer died of lung cancer last night. Mr. Kendricks, a native of Birmingham, had been hospitalized since Sept. 25. Another early Motown artist, singer Stevie Wonder, had visited him Saturday.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Joe Nawrozki is a member of the staff of The Evening Sun | June 6, 1991
THE LONG, thin body rolled into the emergency room of a Philadelphia hospital last Saturday had bright, multicolored Bermuda shorts, lime green sport shirt and white sneakers. He carried no identification.After he was pronounced dead, the doctors released the body to the city's medical examiner's office. In the routine of such procedures, it was tagged "John Doe."Not until the afternoon, when the FBI fingerprints came back, did the body get a name: Davis Eli Ruffin, 50, place of birth, Meridian, Miss.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 7, 1992
Last year, Eddie Kendricks sat in a pew in Detroit's New Bethel Baptist Church, hunched over and weeping steadily as he said farewell to David Ruffin -- his singing partner in and out of the Temptations.Ruffin's death was "tough on Eddie," said a friend seated nearby. "They've been through a lot together. They loved each other, hated each other, but they were always better together than they were apart."At 10:35 p.m. Monday, Mr. Kendricks joined his partner in death, succumbing to lung cancer in Birmingham, Ala. He was 52.Mr.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 19, 2003
WASHINGTON -- I am the world's leading expert in "temptology." As such, I know just about every trivial thing there is to know about Motown's storied singing group, The Temptations. I know they recorded once as The Pirates. I know they were the first Motown act to win a Grammy. I know bass singer Melvin Franklin's nickname was Blue. But the one thing I didn't know was how they wound up on an enemy's list posted by the National Rifle Association. We have Bob Herbert to thank for alerting us to said list.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 11, 1998
America loved "The Temptations" miniseries, but nobody loved it like Baltimore.Nationally, 45 million people watched last week's two-night, four-hour NBC film about the Motown singing group, according to Nielsen ratings released yesterday. That makes "The Temptations" a hit by any standard, especially since it was up against such November "sweeps" counterprogramming as an Oprah Winfrey "presents" movie on ABC, a Chuck Norris made-for-TV film on CBS and the creatures from Jurassic Park on Fox.But the Nielsen figure that is absolutely staggering is that one out of every three TVs in the Baltimore market that were turned on from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Nov. 1 and 2 was tuned to "The Temptations."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 4, 1998
I FLASHED MY daylong bus pass at the subway station attendant just as I noticed the tune he was singing, only slightly above a whisper."I never heard about or caught her playing. "A line from the Temptations' "The Girl's Alright With Me," quite possibly the most exquisite song ever recorded."Ah, a Tempts tune," I said. "Did you watch the movie?""Didn't everybody?" he answered.No doubt most die-hard Temptations fans did. Others simply wouldn't have to. There wasn't much the NBC miniseries "The Temptations" could tell die-hard Tempts fans that we didn't already know.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 7, 2007
Ah, what a difference one word makes! I got the word on the grapevine that the Temptations are scheduled to appear at the African-American Heritage Festival tomorrow night, and I figured Camden Yards is exactly where I'll be around 6:30 p.m. Then I read the schedule in The Sun and looked closely at the words. "The Temptations Revue featuring Dennis Edwards and Ali Woodson." Temptations Revue? Revue? You mean I won't be getting the Temps? OK, so Edwards and Woodson technically are Temps.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 15, 1994
No matter how much Motown might have insisted through the '60s that all the record label's artists were equally important to the Motown family, the fans knew some acts were more equal than others. It was no secret that the Supremes were a bigger deal than the Marvelettes or Martha Reeves and the Vandellas -- or, for that matter, that Diana Ross was seen as a brighter star than Mary Wilson or Florence Ballard.Nowhere was Motown's private pecking order more apparent, though, than with the Temptations, who clearly were considered the company's classiest act. Even those who felt the Miracles had more sophisticated material, or that the Four Tops had a stronger front man (the incredibly soulful Levi Stubbs)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.