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NEWS
April 26, 2007
JAMES A. MELVILLE, 80, of Columbia, MD, passed away peacefully at Charlotte Hall Veterans Home Thursday, April 19, 2007. He was a veteran of the United States Navy and loved this country dearly. He was a graduate of Dartmouth College, NH, and was captain of their football team's defense. Jim was a nationally ranked amateur tennis player, winning the Middle States Tennis Championship, the Virginia over 65 title, the Maryland over 65 title, and the Maryland over 75 Senior Olympics Championship in 2004.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 3, 2013
I always thought that for any negotiations to succeed both sides have to have something that is "negotiable. " For the Republicans in Congress to hold the president's Affordable Health Care Act hostage to the stopping, defunding and/or dismantling of "Obamacare," is ludicrous. It's simply not going to happen. Why would the president agree to harm or kill the crowning achievement of his presidency? It's tantamount to asking him to kill his "baby. " It simply is non-negotiable - and the Republicans know it!
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NEWS
June 23, 2006
On June 19, 2006, MELVILLE WARREN LOWMAN of Ferndale; devoted husband of the late Margaret Lowman (nee Coleman) for 57 years; beloved father of Melville J. Lowman, Maureen L. Agro, Bonnie Nugent and Margaret Atkinson; cherished grandfather of seven and great-grandfather of four. The family will receive visitors at the family owned Singleton Funeral Home, 1 Second Avenue, S.W. (at Crain Highway) Glen Burnie on Sunday, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9pm with a VFW Service during the evening visitation.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
Melville French Heath II, an avid traveler and a self-trained guitarist who grew coveted peonies and taught French and Spanish at private schools in the city as well as Baltimore and Cecil counties, died April 12 of a heart attack. The retired teacher, who moved to Southport, N.C., last year and was building a home along the Cape Fear River with his companion, Ethel Taylor, was 69. Mr. Heath was born in Massachusetts, the youngest of three boys. His father worked in insurance and his mother ran the household while maintaining a boutique clothing business on the side.
NEWS
June 29, 2005
On June 27, 2005, MELVILLE WESTBROOK, JR., devoted husband of Idell Pugh. Beloved father of Clifford (Carol) and Melville (Joyce) Pugh III. He is also survived by three grandchildren, Jennifer, Adam and Kelsey, three brothers - Fenton (Myrna), Harry (Geraldine), and Joseph (Jo Ann). One sister-in-law Marguerite Duere, one brother-in-law, Thomas Campbell. A host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Wednesday after 2 P.M. where the family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. Family will receive friends on Thursday at the St. Mary's of The Assumption RCC, 5502 York Road at 9 A.M. at which time fraternity service will begin.
NEWS
September 26, 2005
On September 23, 2005, BETTY M. LESLIE-MELVILLE STEELE, beloved wife of VADM (Ret.) George P. Steele; loving mother of Rick Anderson and his wife Bryony of Nairobi, Kenya, Dancy Bruce Mills and her husband Carder of Glen Arm, MD, and the late Mc Donnell Bruce; dear daughter of the late Richard and Ida Mc Donnell; cherished grandmother of Garrick and Rex Anderson, Liza Mills, Coale and Jock Bruce, Alice Devaney and Michael Behrens; caring aunt of Dick...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | September 24, 2005
Betty Leslie-Melville, an unconventional conservationist who dedicated much of her life to protecting the once-imperiled Rothschild's giraffe, died yesterday of a type of dementia at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Roland Park resident was 78. Known as the Giraffe Lady, she founded the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife USA after settling in Kenya nearly 40 years ago. She worked to save the endangered Rothschild's giraffe, one of three subspecies of the gangly, treetop-munching animal known for its immense size and snow-white legs.
NEWS
By Tom Worgo and Tom Worgo,Contributing Writer | July 19, 1992
The pictures, trophies, plaques, medals and certificates that crowd three shelves in the living room of James Melville's Long Reach Village home boast his athletic achievements.The honors include a silver medal from the 1990 Maryland senior Olympics, a certificate for his role on the No. 3 U.S. senior doubles squash team in 1982, and numerous trophies from tennis tournaments he has won.Melville, a 65-year-old active senior tennis player who displays the enthusiasm and competitiveness of a person one-third his age, moved to Columbia two years ago from Pittsburgh, and has made a name for himself with the Maryland tennis community.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
Melville Warren Lowman, a longtime resident of South Baltimore's Brooklyn neighborhood and a World War II veteran who wrote an unpublished memoir of his wartime experiences, died of kidney failure Monday at FutureCare Chesapeake in Arnold. He was 81. Mr. Lowman lived in the Pontiac Avenue house in Brooklyn where he was born and raised, until moving to Ferndale in Anne Arundel County in 1996. For the last two years, he had been a resident of the Arnold nursing facility. After the death of his father, a master mechanic who was killed in an industrial accident at a Baltimore foundry, Mr. Lowman dropped out of Benjamin Franklin Junior High School and went to work to help support his family.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2001
William F. Melville Jr., who was the first president and chief executive officer of MBNA America, died Wednesday at FutureCare Chesapeake in Arnold of respiratory failure from Alzheimer's disease. The Severna Park resident was 80. Mr. Melville, a longtime Roland Park resident who had lived in Severna Park since 1995, rose from bank teller to become president and CEO of the credit card giant. He began as a teller in 1946 with Fidelity Trust in Baltimore, which was later acquired by Maryland National Bank.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
Both fans and detractors of Quentin Tarantino should check out films by his great predecessor, the French writer-director Jean-Pierre Melville, whose "Army of Shadows," a summer hit at the Charles several years ago, plays like an adult riposte to "Inglourious Basterds." Beginning Saturday, the Charles Theatre showcases a terrific introduction to Melville's work. "Doulos: the Finger Man" is a 1962 crime film that conveys his hard-boiled love for genuine mavericks and their individualistic styles.
NEWS
By Shreyo Banerjee and Shreyo Banerjee,special to the Sun | March 14, 2008
Funds are low, and St. Godley's Girls' School is on the brink of being closed down. Only a pocket-picking musical can save it. Enter ... Herman Melville? One can only speculate as to exactly what Robert Longden and Hereward Kaye were thinking when they conceptualized Moby Dick! The Musical -- "Pour me another, Frank," sounds likely -- but the students at Wilde Lake High School take the premise to heart and fuse it with a delicious insanity of their own to portray St. Godley's inspired theatrical production of Melville's classic.
FEATURES
November 14, 2007
Nov. 14 1851 Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick was first published in the United States. 1969 Apollo 12 blasted off for the moon.
NEWS
November 13, 2007
DR. DOROTHY MELVILLE SINCLAIR, a native of Baltimore, former reference librarian at Enoch Pratt Free Library and retired professor of library science at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, died there on September 28, 2007. Daughter of James Melville and Ena (nee Gambrill) Sinclair both life-long residents of Baltimore. Dorothy was interred in the family plot at Loudon Park Cemetery on Monday, November 12, 2007.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 22, 2007
LES ENFANTS TERRIBLES -- The Criterion Collection / $39.95 As a collaboration between an established master of French cinema (writer Jean Cocteau) and one of its rising stars (director Jean-Pierre Melville), 1950's Les Enfants Terribles is a landmark film that has been eagerly studied, analyzed and picked apart for decades. But watching this extraordinary film should never be regarded as simply an academic exercise: It's too rich, too endlessly fascinating, too singular for that. Based on Cocteau's sensational and best-selling 1929 novel, Les Enfants Terribles unveils the story of teen siblings Elisabeth and Paul, whose relationship seems incestuous (some argue that it stops just short of that, though a close viewing of the film suggests otherwise)
NEWS
By Debby Applegate and Debby Applegate,Los Angeles Times | July 15, 2007
Leviathan The History of Whaling in America By Eric Jay Dolin W.W. Norton / 480 pages / $27.95 On Jan. 3, 1841, a 21-year-old schoolteacher named Herman Melville set sail aboard the Acushnet, a Yankee whale ship headed for the South Seas. After 15 grueling months, Melville jumped ship in the cannibal-infested Marquesas Islands, figuring that even being eaten would be better than life on a whaler. Still, this failed voyage had a remarkable effect on American culture. Inspired by true stories of vengeful whales - particularly the sinking of the Essex by an enraged sperm whale and the exploits of an albino whale nicknamed Mocha Dick, legendary for his ferocious attacks on whale ships off Chile - Melville's tale of Captain Ahab's suicidal obsession with killing the white whale Moby-Dick has become a symbol of humankind's doomed struggle to subdue nature.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1995
Lockheed Martin Corp. has been awarded a $244 million contract to take over the data processing, information management and telecommunication operations of retailing giant Melville Corp.The contract represents Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin's first major foray into the commercial market for providing such services.As part of the agreement, Lockheed Martin will acquire some of the assets of Melville's data processing centers. The purchase price is included in the value of the contract award and was not disclosed.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
Both fans and detractors of Quentin Tarantino should check out films by his great predecessor, the French writer-director Jean-Pierre Melville, whose "Army of Shadows," a summer hit at the Charles several years ago, plays like an adult riposte to "Inglourious Basterds." Beginning Saturday, the Charles Theatre showcases a terrific introduction to Melville's work. "Doulos: the Finger Man" is a 1962 crime film that conveys his hard-boiled love for genuine mavericks and their individualistic styles.
NEWS
April 26, 2007
JAMES A. MELVILLE, 80, of Columbia, MD, passed away peacefully at Charlotte Hall Veterans Home Thursday, April 19, 2007. He was a veteran of the United States Navy and loved this country dearly. He was a graduate of Dartmouth College, NH, and was captain of their football team's defense. Jim was a nationally ranked amateur tennis player, winning the Middle States Tennis Championship, the Virginia over 65 title, the Maryland over 65 title, and the Maryland over 75 Senior Olympics Championship in 2004.
NEWS
January 8, 2007
On Friday January 5, 2007, JOHN MELVILLE "Johnny" MILLER, 78, formerly of Baltimore, MD, at his residence in Gastonia. Son of the late Melville and Mary Byrne Miller. He is survived by 5 cousins, Joan Siscosky and husband Charles of Lewes, DE, Patricia Helwig and husband Harry of Pasadena, MD, Herbert Saffield and wife Mary Ellen and Frank Narer of Glen Burnie, MD, Beverly Arnold of Baltimore, MD. He was preceded in death by his parents and his wife Robbie Parks Miller. Visitation Monday 6:00 to 8: P.M. at Carothers Funeral Home, Gastonia, N.C. Funeral services Tuesday January 9, 2007, 11 A.M. at Queen of The Apostles Catholic Church, Belmont, N.C. See www.carothersfuneralhomesgastonia.
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