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NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 2004
Great Fortune Buffet is a hybrid of two great American traditions: the Chinese restaurant and the all-you-can-eat corral. The result is a melting pot of choices: from raw oysters to dim sum, from sushi to chunks of Jell-O. Some offerings, in and of themselves, reflect ingenious cultural collisions. The cheese won tons are one example. On a very chilly January night, Great Fortune Buffet Chinese Restaurant was quiet and the steam tables were full and well-tended. By family request, I decided to order mostly from the menu, which resembles the general idea of Chinese-American food more than the idiosyncratic buffet.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2003
The plane was coming in last week from Toronto, and Blast forward Chris Handsor could barely contain his excitement. His family was coming for Christmas. His longtime sweetheart, Michelle, and their two children, Sheradan, 10, and Christian, 18 months, were making their first trip to Baltimore since he signed with the Blast in August. "I'm really looking forward to just sitting on the couch and being able to hold my kids," Handsor said. "I'm looking forward to doing all the things this Christmas that most fathers can do every day."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 18, 2003
HE WAS halfway across the War Memorial Plaza when they started screaming at him. They surrounded Howard "Pete" Rawlings, and squeezed in on him suffocatingly, and strode menacingly with him step by step. Rawlings did not stop. He seemed to ignore them all. They wanted him to change his mind on the next mayor of Baltimore. He wanted to change history. On that sunny summer morning four years ago, Rawlings was endorsing Martin O'Malley and not Lawrence Bell, setting off the most overtly ugly moment in modern city political history - and one of its most liberating.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | September 21, 2003
Why America Slept: The Failure to Prevent 9 / 11, by Gerald Posner. Random House. 241 pages. $24.95. Any literate person who cares about the future of humanity has absorbed a mind-numbing number of words since Sept. 11, 2001, words attempting to explain how America-haters managed to ram airplanes into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Until now, figuring out the blame game has been difficult, because those who are supposed to be monitoring the evildoers tend to point the finger elsewhere.
NEWS
September 19, 2002
Charen's attack on NEA ignores critical facts Mona Charen's column "Liberals' lies leave our kids confused"(Opinion * Commentary, Sept. 2) leaves me confused about her unjustified criticism of the National Education Association's (NEA) guidance to teachers about the anniversary of Sept. 11. Although it's true, as Ms. Charen says, "that all of the individuals who attacked this country on Sept. 11 were Arabs," it is also true that our president sees fit to invite the Saudi hierarchy to his ranch.
NEWS
By Lucie L. Snodgrass and Lucie L. Snodgrass,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2002
Like millions of her fellow Americans, Rosy Lawrence is planning a cookout for the Fourth of July. As she has for the past 29 years, the soft-spoken Edgewood resident will join a group of close friends and family to relax, celebrate America's independence and eat good food. It's part of how she expresses her patriotism for her country. "We do practically the same menu as everyone else," the diminutive, dark-haired woman says cheerfully. "Macaroni and potato salads, and watermelon and barbecued chicken."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Olesker and By Michael Olesker,Sun Staff | March 17, 2002
The Short Sweet Dream of Eduardo Gutierrez, by Jimmy Breslin. Crown Publishers. 198 pages. $22. Jimmy Breslin's new book, The Short Sweet Life of Eduardo Gutierrez, reminds us that the journey to America is more than a Kodak moment at the Statue of Liberty. It begins in desperation and continues with each generation of new arrivals settling for the grubbiest of jobs, the shabbiest of living conditions, and the most precarious daily existence. This is the extended entrance test America gives to all who would reach for her promise.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2001
SEATTLE - Arizona Diamondbacks outfielder Luis Gonzalez should be cursing the fates right now. He is having the season of his life - and just might be a candidate for baseball's elusive Triple Crown - but his amazing all-around performance has been obscured all season by the home run heroics of San Francisco Giants superstar Barry Bonds. Gonzalez has got to be irritated, right? He's got to be upset that he's not getting his proper due from the national media and the fans, right? He's waiting to get the respect he deserves for a first-half performance that includes a .355 average, 35 home runs and 86 RBI, right?
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 2001
POSTVILLE, Iowa -- This is a town where on one side of the street, an Israeli can get halvah, while on the other a Mexican can wire money back home. A town where you can hear both the Norwegian uff da and the Yiddish oy vey in a single office. A town of just 2,300 residents, but more than 20 ethnic groups. Welcome to the United Nations of Iowa. How this community in the northeast corner of the state became the United Nations in miniature is in some ways the story of America, circa 21st century, writ small.
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