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NEWS
June 30, 2004
On June 28, 2004, LAURA J. MELODY (nee Jones), beloved wife of the late Felix Joseph Melody and devoted mother of Jeannette Teresa Melody of Cockeysville, MD, Richard Patrick Melody of Cockeysville, MD and James Vincent Melody of Egg Harbor, N.J. Also survived by six grandchildren and one great-grandson. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home, Inc., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook), on Wednesday from 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be offered in St. Pius X Church on Thursday, July 1 at 10 A.M. Interment New Cathedral Cemetery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Allison Eatough | April 24, 2014
The women of the Upper Chesapeake Chorus are far from similar. Their ages span 50 years, with the youngest members in their 20s and the oldest in their 70s. Their professions include everything from teachers and lawyers to stay-at-home moms and graphic designers. Some had professional singing experience before joining the chorus, while others just liked to sing around the house. But when this diverse group joins together to sing, chorus members say something magical happens: They create resounding, uplifting and energetic music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 1, 1991
LIVERPOOL ORATORIOPaul McCartney/Carl Davis (EMI Classics 54371)Tempting as it is to joke that this is where "the cute one" becomes "the classical one," Paul McCartney's "Liverpool Oratorio" is quite earnest about its aspirations. Recorded with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic and a first-rate set of soloists (including Dame Kiri Te Kanawa), it arrives with all the trappings of a serious orchestral work -- except, of course, the dissonance and abstractions usually associated with contemporary classical music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
In August 2011, Baltimore singer/songwriter Adam Lempel finally realized he needed to get serious about his music. The epiphany came where many epiphanies occur - in a hospital bed. "I ended up getting sick. I had a pneumothorax, which is like a hole in my lung," Lempel, who performs Friday at Metro Gallery, said from a park bench in his Bolton Hill neighborhood. "Just being in the hospital put things into perspective. If I want to make this, I just have to make it and not really worry about it. " The result was the self-titled debut album from Adam Lempel and the Heartbeats, a noticeable shift in style from Lempel's other band, the psychedelic-rock duo Weekends.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | August 6, 1991
JAMES INGRAM knows how stiff the competition is for good songs."Trying to get James Ingram's music on a James Ingram album is sometimes tough," he said yesterday from his downtown hotel, where he was preparing for tonight's "Night on the Town" show with Patti Austin and others at Pier Six Concert Pavilion."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 31, 1993
One of the downsides of celebrity is that it makes people look at you funny. Instead of being known for what you did and how you did it, suddenly you become seen in terms of your looks, your quirks and your social contacts. And while that doesn't necessarily diminish the public's appreciation of your real work, it can make it hard for them to remember what brought you fame in the first place.Take Mariah Carey. When her self-titled debut popped up in 1990, all most listeners knew about her was her name and the sound of her voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 17, 2008
The friendly woman behind the counter thinks I've been stood up. "How late is your date, honey?" she asks. I smile. "It's not a date, but he's late." For half an hour on a chilly Monday evening, I've been sitting at the downstairs window inside Mount Vernon's trendy XS restaurant. I'm waiting on Raheem DeVaughn, the Grammy-nominated neo-soul artist who lives just outside Washington. His publicist called my cell phone earlier and said the artist is stuck in rush-hour traffic. So I pull out my iPod and end up killing another 15 minutes shuffling tunes before the artist appears.
FEATURES
By Frank B. Edwards | July 26, 1998
The year that she turned 6, Melody Mooner said, "I want to take lessons. I want to be good at something special. But I don't know what."In January, Mother Mooner took her skating, but Melody said, "I don't think so."I hate falling down on the cold ice."In February, Father Mooner sent her to ski school, but Melody said, "I don't think so."I could never go down hills so fast."In March, Grandmother Mooner paid for ballet lessons, but Melody said, "I don't think so."All that twirling makes me dizzy.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
It was an intriguing day at Laurel Park yesterday with a shower hitting the track the race before the feature, a rainbow arching over the backstretch following the downpour, then the rare bald eagle flying in for a visit to the infield pond just before the card ended. But all the off-track activity had no effect on the competition itself as prohibitive favorites continued to rule. The trend was underscored again in the featured $75,000 Lady Baltimore Stakes when Melody Queen upheld her even-money status to score a 2 1/4 -length victory over the rallying second choice, Orange Sunset.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 8, 2003
Mozart and Tchaikovsky lived roughly a century apart - and were light-years apart emotionally - but had in common an effortless gift for ear-catching melody. Although Mozart could do infinitely more with his melodies than Tchaikovsky (or anyone else, for that matter), Tchaikovsky, at his best, could mold ideas into structures of Mozartean proportion and symmetry. That's one good reason to pair these two composers on a program, as the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has done. Another is that Tchaikovsky positively worshiped Mozart's music.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Melody A. Cronin, a Baltimore attorney who was known for her pro bono work with the Wills for Heroes Foundation, died Sunday of acute myelocytic leukemia at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Fells Point resident was 35. "Mel was a quick-witted, intelligent attorney and she always worked long, long hours, even after she became a mother," said Kari M. Kelly, a colleague and real estate attorney at the Baltimore law firm of Rosenberg Martin Greenberg, where Mrs. Cronin worked as an associate in the firm's litigation and creditors' rights groups.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore sun | February 17, 2012
An article in The Baltimore Sun  by Chris Kaltenbach recounts how documents from 1917 on the musical arrangement of "The Star-Spangled Banner" came to be donated to Fort McHenry.   The tune to which Francis Scott Key's poem (originally titled "Defence of Fort McHenry") is that of "To Anacreon in Heaven. " Anacreon, the Greek lyric poet, was the patron of The Anacreontic Club of eighteenth-century London, which celebrated food and drink. The melody is attributed to the British musicologist and composer John Stafford Smith.  But it is probably not the text of   "To Anacreon in Heaven"*  that buzzed in Key's head as he wrote his verses, but a different set of words, "Adams and Liberty,"  a patriotic text by Robert Treat Paine also set to Smith's tune:  YE sons of Columbia, who bravely have fought,          For those rights, which unstained from your Sires had descended,      May you long taste the blessings your valour has brought,          And your sons reap the soil which their fathers defended.                          'Mid the reign of mild Peace,                          May your nation increase,      With the glory of Rome, and the wisdom of Greece;          And ne'er shall the sons of Columbia be slaves,          While the earth bears a plant, or the sea rolls its waves.
EXPLORE
November 30, 2011
The Susquehanna Symphony Orchestra presents its popular holiday concert Saturday, Dec. 3. This year, it's "Holiday Melodies and Peanuts" - the Charles Schulz kind. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. at Bel Air High School, 100 Heighe St. in Bel Air. Tickets, $20 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for students, are available at Preston's and Music Land in Bel Air or at the door. Or visit http://www.ssorchestra.org and click on Ticket Leap. According to SSO founder and director Sheldon Bair, the concert will contain many surprises.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | November 28, 2011
Whereas some 25-year-olds find themselves grappling with the newly dubbed “quarter-life crisis,” Rachel Harkins, of Kingsville, is right on track to accomplishing her goals. Following a four-year stint as campus ministry director at her alma mater Mount de Sales Academy for Girls in Catonsville, Maryland, Rachel embarked on a new part of her journey earlier this year when she began teaching religion at The John Carroll School in Bel Air. “Being a role model is a great responsibility and a great privilege at the same time,” Rachel says.
NEWS
February 19, 2009
Peacefully at home on February 16, 2009, DONALD W., SR.; beloved husband of Diane J. Crislip (nee Ruth); devoted father of Donald Crislip, Jr., Daniel Crislip and Melody Ann Esposito; cherished grandfather of Amber, Marysa, Chandler, Cierra, and Carly Crislip, Lauryn and Isabella Esposito; loving son of Ruby Feltner and the late Gilbert B. Crislip; dear brother of Loretta "Sue" Timmerman, Patricia Lawton, Charles and Frederick Crislip. Relatives and friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road on Wednesday and Thursday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.m. Funeral services will be held on Friday 10 A.M. Interment Sacred Heart of Jesus Cemetery.
NEWS
June 15, 2008
On June 12, 2008, VERNON A. "Guy" BALDWIN JR., beloved husband of M. Melody (nee Sullivan) Baldwin; devoted father of Angel Baldwin of Hampden, Sarah Baldwin of Reisterstown; step-father of Justin Frick, Lindsay Frick and Kaitlyn Frick, all of Reisterstown; dear brother of Verna Coultas of Hanover, PA., Vivian Freeman of Owings Mills, and Carol Pettrey of Stewartstown, PA. Also survived by five grandchildren. Memorial services will be held on Monday, at 2 P.M. at the Eline Funeral Home, 934 S. Main Street, Hampstead.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | December 13, 1991
Police are searching for a 12-year-old girl who failed to return to her West Baltimore home Dec. 1 after spending the night with a friend.Melody McKoy, of the 300 block of N. Mount St., slept over at a friend's house on nearby Saratoga Street on the night of Nov. 30, police said.She was last seen Dec. 1 about 7 p.m. while on her way home, police said."Right now, we're not suspecting foul play," said Agent Arlene Jenkins, a police spokeswoman. "We have no indication she's in harm's way."But Jenkins said police are concerned because of Melody's age and because she has no money or other means to take care of herself.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 30, 2000
Ever since the bebop revolution of the 1940s, jazz musicians have tended to see songs in terms of possibility. They would look not at the melody but the harmony beneath, and tried to imagine the infinite new melodies that could be extrapolated from those chords. That's why many jazz combos spend so little time playing the melody - they're anxious to get to the good stuff. Charles Lloyd (who performs at the Baltimore Museum of Art tomorrow) takes rather a different approach on his latest recording, "The Water Is Wide."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 1, 2008
To a large extent, modern music is in the ear of the beholder, but there are various characteristics that your average audience would agree on as constituting this genre - undetectable (and certainly un-hummable) melodies, confusing rhythms, unexpected sounds emanating from traditional instruments. In every generation, a composer comes to symbolize this uncomfortable, severe modernity. Once upon a time, it was Beethoven (decades after his death, critics were still railing against his "wrong chords" and "incomprehensible wildness")
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 17, 2008
The friendly woman behind the counter thinks I've been stood up. "How late is your date, honey?" she asks. I smile. "It's not a date, but he's late." For half an hour on a chilly Monday evening, I've been sitting at the downstairs window inside Mount Vernon's trendy XS restaurant. I'm waiting on Raheem DeVaughn, the Grammy-nominated neo-soul artist who lives just outside Washington. His publicist called my cell phone earlier and said the artist is stuck in rush-hour traffic. So I pull out my iPod and end up killing another 15 minutes shuffling tunes before the artist appears.
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