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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
Melissa Leo has officially entered overdrive. Her past two years have made even the half-decade she spent playing a Charm City cop in "Homicide" look like a modest accomplishment. She hasn't taken a timeout since she earned a best actress Academy Award nomination for playing a struggling upstate New Yorker who smuggles illegal aliens in "Frozen River" (2008). She has acted in a string of films. "Conviction" with Hilary Swank opened this weekend in Baltimore. "The Dry Land" with America Ferrera appears on DVD next month and "The Fighter" with Mark Wahlberg will start rolling into theaters in December.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Sun reporter | February 24, 2012
Looking for backstage access to this year's Academy Awards? You've come to the right place. All weekend, I'll be blogging about what is being said backstage, as Hollywood takes the time to pat itself on the back for whatever good work it did in 2011. The fun begins on Saturday, when I'll be attending the 27th annual Spirit Awards, given to movies produced outside the major studios and with limited budgets. Among this year's big contenders is"The Artist," which is also favored in the Oscar race -- meaning this could be the first time ever that the same film has won the Best Picture Spirit and Oscar.
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By William E. Thompson Jr. and William E. Thompson Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1997
Actor John Heard will have 18 months of supervised probation and must attend a 22-week program for abusive men at the House of Ruth, Baltimore District Court Judge Barbara B. Waxman decided yesterday.Heard, 51, best known for his role as the father in the "Home Alone" movies, was found guilty in March of trespassing and harassing his ex-girlfriend, "Homicide" actress Melissa Leo, with telephone calls. The charges resulted from a dispute between the two over Heard's visitation rights to their son, John Matthew, 9, who was placed in Leo's custody by a New York judge in 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
Melissa Leo has officially entered overdrive. Her past two years have made even the half-decade she spent playing a Charm City cop in "Homicide" look like a modest accomplishment. She hasn't taken a timeout since she earned a best actress Academy Award nomination for playing a struggling upstate New Yorker who smuggles illegal aliens in "Frozen River" (2008). She has acted in a string of films. "Conviction" with Hilary Swank opened this weekend in Baltimore. "The Dry Land" with America Ferrera appears on DVD next month and "The Fighter" with Mark Wahlberg will start rolling into theaters in December.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
Buzz" has become the byword for the combination of reviews, gossip and publicity that may win the attention of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. But the fun and significance of Oscar can go way deeper than buzz, into a magic quality we'll call "mojo" - a blend of filmmaking zest and originality, uncanny timing and tumultuous audience response that can drive "little movies that could" as well as big-studio blockbusters into moviegoers' bloodstreams. Slumdog Millionaire has mojo to the max. But so does a much smaller independent film named Frozen River, which has garnered a best actress nomination for Melissa Leo and a best original script nod for first-time writer-director Courtney Hunt.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 5, 2008
From the moment Melissa Leo's sharp features and mane of red hair slashed through the dull precinct light of Homicide: Life on the Street, she offered something new to movie and TV audiences: a woman who was just as smart and tough as any of the guys (the role was originally written as male) but also unapologetically different, passing judgment on partners and perps alike and unafraid to use all the crime-solving tools at her disposal, including what used to be called "woman's intuition."
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,sun staff | May 24, 1998
Melissa Leo was always convinced that her "Homicide" character, Kay Howard, was not supposed to be your stock excuse for sexual tension in a male-dominated cop show."
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | February 10, 2009
Starring Melissa Leo, Misty Upham. Written and directed by Courtney Hunt. Released by Sony Pictures. $28.95 *** 1/2 (3 1/2 STARS) dvds Melissa Leo, still thought of fondly in Baltimore for playing Sgt. Kay Howard in Homicide: Life On the Street, is simultaneously tender, powerful and vulnerable in Frozen River, a quiet drama about family, sacrifice and loyalty among people who live on little else. Leo plays Ray Eddy, a mother of two living near an Indian reservation along New York's U.S.-Canadian border, whose gambling-addicted husband has fled a few days before Christmas.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 26, 2003
SUN SCORE 2-stars Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu apparently thinks that fractured narratives about characters connected by car crashes are his metier, but 21 Grams, his first English-speaking feature, is a considerable comedown from Amores perros. That spectacular Mexican debut told three intertwining, time-bending stories that were provocative and touching in isolation, and convulsively moving when you saw how their characters fit into a dazzling overall mosaic. No such pattern emerges from 21 Grams.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1999
Characters we lovedWhat a great cast of characters: conspiracy theorists, the chronically depressed and the always angry. And those were the good guys, the cop stars of "Homicide: Life On the Street" for seven seasons.The key players:ANDRE BRAUGHER-- Baltimoreans mourn the end of 'Homicide.'Character: Det. Frank PembletonCharacterization: Ruthless interrogator, intimidating presence, God's avenging angel. Seasons: 1-6Left squad when: Probe of the Luther Mahoney murder case revealed the killer was one of his fellow cops, a revelation that convinced him to quit the department.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
Buzz" has become the byword for the combination of reviews, gossip and publicity that may win the attention of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. But the fun and significance of Oscar can go way deeper than buzz, into a magic quality we'll call "mojo" - a blend of filmmaking zest and originality, uncanny timing and tumultuous audience response that can drive "little movies that could" as well as big-studio blockbusters into moviegoers' bloodstreams. Slumdog Millionaire has mojo to the max. But so does a much smaller independent film named Frozen River, which has garnered a best actress nomination for Melissa Leo and a best original script nod for first-time writer-director Courtney Hunt.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | February 10, 2009
Starring Melissa Leo, Misty Upham. Written and directed by Courtney Hunt. Released by Sony Pictures. $28.95 *** 1/2 (3 1/2 STARS) dvds Melissa Leo, still thought of fondly in Baltimore for playing Sgt. Kay Howard in Homicide: Life On the Street, is simultaneously tender, powerful and vulnerable in Frozen River, a quiet drama about family, sacrifice and loyalty among people who live on little else. Leo plays Ray Eddy, a mother of two living near an Indian reservation along New York's U.S.-Canadian border, whose gambling-addicted husband has fled a few days before Christmas.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 5, 2008
From the moment Melissa Leo's sharp features and mane of red hair slashed through the dull precinct light of Homicide: Life on the Street, she offered something new to movie and TV audiences: a woman who was just as smart and tough as any of the guys (the role was originally written as male) but also unapologetically different, passing judgment on partners and perps alike and unafraid to use all the crime-solving tools at her disposal, including what used to be called "woman's intuition."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 28, 2004
A13-year-old New Zealand girl. An actor channeling a member of the Rolling Stones. A violent, gritty Brazilian film cast with amateur actors. An ostensible sure thing whose reception instead proved nearly as cold as its name. It's nice to see the Oscars haven't lost their ability to surprise. The 2003 Academy Award nominations, announced at a pre-dawn ceremony yesterday in Beverly Hills, proved a delightfully adroit mix of the expected and unexpected. Yes, the early favorites dominated - The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King led all films with 11 nominations, including a Best Picture nod. But movies that lie off most people's radar screens also were recognized.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 26, 2003
SUN SCORE 2-stars Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu apparently thinks that fractured narratives about characters connected by car crashes are his metier, but 21 Grams, his first English-speaking feature, is a considerable comedown from Amores perros. That spectacular Mexican debut told three intertwining, time-bending stories that were provocative and touching in isolation, and convulsively moving when you saw how their characters fit into a dazzling overall mosaic. No such pattern emerges from 21 Grams.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1999
Characters we lovedWhat a great cast of characters: conspiracy theorists, the chronically depressed and the always angry. And those were the good guys, the cop stars of "Homicide: Life On the Street" for seven seasons.The key players:ANDRE BRAUGHER-- Baltimoreans mourn the end of 'Homicide.'Character: Det. Frank PembletonCharacterization: Ruthless interrogator, intimidating presence, God's avenging angel. Seasons: 1-6Left squad when: Probe of the Luther Mahoney murder case revealed the killer was one of his fellow cops, a revelation that convinced him to quit the department.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Sun reporter | February 24, 2012
Looking for backstage access to this year's Academy Awards? You've come to the right place. All weekend, I'll be blogging about what is being said backstage, as Hollywood takes the time to pat itself on the back for whatever good work it did in 2011. The fun begins on Saturday, when I'll be attending the 27th annual Spirit Awards, given to movies produced outside the major studios and with limited budgets. Among this year's big contenders is"The Artist," which is also favored in the Oscar race -- meaning this could be the first time ever that the same film has won the Best Picture Spirit and Oscar.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 14, 1994
Maybe "Homicide: Life on the Street" is only the second-best police drama on network television, behind "NYPD Blue." But what a wonderful second it is.It's been so long since the last episode aired in January that I forgot how smart the dialogue was, how rich the acting is, how the show manages to play viewers back and forth between funny and profound, light and dark -- like maybe no show since "St. Elsewhere" (which was the work of "Homicide" executive producer...
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,sun staff | May 24, 1998
Melissa Leo was always convinced that her "Homicide" character, Kay Howard, was not supposed to be your stock excuse for sexual tension in a male-dominated cop show."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 15, 1998
Paula Vogel's "How I Learned To Drive" is set in a time when, as one character puts it, people knew about troubles, but didn't talk about them.Vogel, however, does talk about them in this daringly disturbing yet entertaining 1998 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, which is receiving its Maryland premiere at Center Stage.The chief "trouble" she talks about is pedophilia, and she talks about it with high theatrical style -- eloquently, metaphorically and with an unusual degree of sympathy for both parties involved.
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