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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1999
Characters we lovedWhat a great cast of characters: conspiracy theorists, the chronically depressed and the always angry. And those were the good guys, the cop stars of "Homicide: Life On the Street" for seven seasons.The key players:ANDRE BRAUGHER-- Baltimoreans mourn the end of 'Homicide.'Character: Det. Frank PembletonCharacterization: Ruthless interrogator, intimidating presence, God's avenging angel. Seasons: 1-6Left squad when: Probe of the Luther Mahoney murder case revealed the killer was one of his fellow cops, a revelation that convinced him to quit the department.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
A couple of hard-edged veteran cops are driving down a desolate Louisiana road after investigating a grisly crime scene in HBO's new Sunday-night drama, “True Detective.” They have been partners for three months but have spoken little about their personal lives. “Ask you something?” the older detective (Woody Harrelson) says. “You a Christian, yeah?” “No,” his partner (Matthew McConaughey) replies, looking out the passenger-side window at the barren landscape.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 17, 1995
Los Angeles -- NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Streets" is going through some character changes this summer. Two are going, one is coming, and there's going to be even more of Frank Pembleton (Andre Braugher), easily the most interesting African-American character in prime-time.Just as the critically acclaimed series finally won a measure of security in May with its first full order of 22 episodes from the network, it was announced that Ned Beatty and Daniel Baldwin were leaving the show.Beatty said he wanted to return to feature films.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | April 1, 2004
The television series Homicide: Life on the Street never actually jumped the shark, though it got close the season that Bayliss (Kyle Secor) decided to explore his repressed gayness. But by "The Complete Season 4," it had dumped the documentary-like everydayness of the original episodes and the great book that inspired it to become one of the best cop shows ever aired. The fourth season found the show without the disgraced Beau Felton (Daniel Baldwin) and the retired Stan Bolander (Ned Beatty)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | April 1, 2004
The television series Homicide: Life on the Street never actually jumped the shark, though it got close the season that Bayliss (Kyle Secor) decided to explore his repressed gayness. But by "The Complete Season 4," it had dumped the documentary-like everydayness of the original episodes and the great book that inspired it to become one of the best cop shows ever aired. The fourth season found the show without the disgraced Beau Felton (Daniel Baldwin) and the retired Stan Bolander (Ned Beatty)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 17, 1996
There is no happily ever after on "Homicide: Life on the Street," so don't come looking for any happy endings in tonight's cliffhanger season finale, titled "Work Related."Last week, Meldrick Lewis (Clark Johnson) was married in the Rose Room of the Belvedere Hotel with everybody merrily dancing the night away to a band straight out of "Twin Peaks." This week, Lewis admits to Kellerman (Reed Diamond) that he has yet to consummate his marriage and, in fact, his new wife, Barbara, has left him.'til death do you what?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 31, 1993
After 15 years as a critic, I thought I had finally learned not to become attached to any TV series.Then along came Barry Levinson's "Homicide," with its dark, wise, nervy look at the way life's really lived and the awful way death comes on the homicide beat in Baltimore.The thing is, I didn't truly fall for the show until last week. And tonight, it ends its nine-episode run and disappears -- probably forever -- into the ether of Hiatus Land.NBC's official word is that "Homicide" goes on hiatus after tonight's episode, which airs at 9 on WMAR (Channel 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 11, 2001
LOS ANGELES -- "Oh, man, I'm really wired." Those are the first words out of the mouth of actor-director Clark Johnson, and he just keeps rolling down the stream-of-consciousness highway. "I mean, I just had a couple of these Parisian licorice things, and they make you like humma, humma. And I shouldn't have done that, because I had a couple of them yesterday, and it was like I was on crack or something. They must be something like pure caffeine, you know? Whew." There's a pause as he takes a colorful little tin of tiny black pellets out of his pocket, opens it and pops another caffeine mini-bomb in his mouth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
A couple of hard-edged veteran cops are driving down a desolate Louisiana road after investigating a grisly crime scene in HBO's new Sunday-night drama, “True Detective.” They have been partners for three months but have spoken little about their personal lives. “Ask you something?” the older detective (Woody Harrelson) says. “You a Christian, yeah?” “No,” his partner (Matthew McConaughey) replies, looking out the passenger-side window at the barren landscape.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 21, 1999
The final moments of "Homicide: Life on the Street" find Detectives Meldrick Lewis (Clark Johnson) and Rene Sheppard (Michael Michele) in an alley in the dark searching for clues to the murder of a man whose body lays nearby.Lewis probes a clump of weeds with the toe of his shoe and the beam of his flashlight. "If I could just find this thing, I could go home," he says, not explaining what exactly the "thing" is."You won't find what you're looking for," Sheppard says dismissively, shining her flashlight on the other side of the alley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 11, 2001
LOS ANGELES -- "Oh, man, I'm really wired." Those are the first words out of the mouth of actor-director Clark Johnson, and he just keeps rolling down the stream-of-consciousness highway. "I mean, I just had a couple of these Parisian licorice things, and they make you like humma, humma. And I shouldn't have done that, because I had a couple of them yesterday, and it was like I was on crack or something. They must be something like pure caffeine, you know? Whew." There's a pause as he takes a colorful little tin of tiny black pellets out of his pocket, opens it and pops another caffeine mini-bomb in his mouth.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 21, 1999
The final moments of "Homicide: Life on the Street" find Detectives Meldrick Lewis (Clark Johnson) and Rene Sheppard (Michael Michele) in an alley in the dark searching for clues to the murder of a man whose body lays nearby.Lewis probes a clump of weeds with the toe of his shoe and the beam of his flashlight. "If I could just find this thing, I could go home," he says, not explaining what exactly the "thing" is."You won't find what you're looking for," Sheppard says dismissively, shining her flashlight on the other side of the alley.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1999
Characters we lovedWhat a great cast of characters: conspiracy theorists, the chronically depressed and the always angry. And those were the good guys, the cop stars of "Homicide: Life On the Street" for seven seasons.The key players:ANDRE BRAUGHER-- Baltimoreans mourn the end of 'Homicide.'Character: Det. Frank PembletonCharacterization: Ruthless interrogator, intimidating presence, God's avenging angel. Seasons: 1-6Left squad when: Probe of the Luther Mahoney murder case revealed the killer was one of his fellow cops, a revelation that convinced him to quit the department.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 17, 1996
There is no happily ever after on "Homicide: Life on the Street," so don't come looking for any happy endings in tonight's cliffhanger season finale, titled "Work Related."Last week, Meldrick Lewis (Clark Johnson) was married in the Rose Room of the Belvedere Hotel with everybody merrily dancing the night away to a band straight out of "Twin Peaks." This week, Lewis admits to Kellerman (Reed Diamond) that he has yet to consummate his marriage and, in fact, his new wife, Barbara, has left him.'til death do you what?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 17, 1995
Los Angeles -- NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Streets" is going through some character changes this summer. Two are going, one is coming, and there's going to be even more of Frank Pembleton (Andre Braugher), easily the most interesting African-American character in prime-time.Just as the critically acclaimed series finally won a measure of security in May with its first full order of 22 episodes from the network, it was announced that Ned Beatty and Daniel Baldwin were leaving the show.Beatty said he wanted to return to feature films.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 31, 1993
After 15 years as a critic, I thought I had finally learned not to become attached to any TV series.Then along came Barry Levinson's "Homicide," with its dark, wise, nervy look at the way life's really lived and the awful way death comes on the homicide beat in Baltimore.The thing is, I didn't truly fall for the show until last week. And tonight, it ends its nine-episode run and disappears -- probably forever -- into the ether of Hiatus Land.NBC's official word is that "Homicide" goes on hiatus after tonight's episode, which airs at 9 on WMAR (Channel 2)
NEWS
September 17, 1995
"Swallows and Amazons," by Arthur Ransome. It's a sailing adventure about kids. My mom read it to me and now I'm reading it to my kids.Clark Johnson (Detective Meldrick Lewis, "Homicide: Life on the Street")
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | August 6, 2000
The chance to see Clark Johnson (a.k.a. Detective Meldrick Lewis of "Homicide") playing the role of a hit man wannabe would be enough to recommend "Deliberate Intent," a made-for-cable movie about a famous Maryland murder case premiering tonight on the FX Channel. But there's more: a strong performance by Academy-Award-winning actor Timothy Hutton in the lead, as well as a screenplay that intelligently illuminates one of the more important recent First Amendment cases. The film, based on a book of the same title by Rod Smolla, follows the story of a former Motown executive, Lawrence Horn (James McDaniel)
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