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By Cathryn Creno and Cathryn Creno,Arizona Republic | August 30, 1995
It's a one-shot jet-lag remedy, estrogen suppressant and sex-drive stimulant, according to Newsweek and three new big-selling books.The hormone supplement melatonin is being bought off health-food store shelves faster than clerks can restock it.But is melatonin really an antidote to age-related hormone problems, as suggested in books like "The Melatonin Miracle," by Drs. Walter Pierpaoli and William Regelson (Simon & Schuster; $21)?And is it really safe to pop a nightly hormone supplement the way you might take vitamin C?
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NEWS
December 8, 2008
New drug may offer relief from jet lag An experimental drug that mimics the effects of the hormone melatonin can reset the body's circadian rhythms, bringing relief to jet-lagged travelers and night-shift workers, researchers reported last week. In a study of 450 people who were subjected to simulated jet lag in a sleep laboratory, a team from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston found that the drug restored near-normal sleep the first night it was used. There were no after effects, minimal side effects and people who took it performed normally the next day, said Dr. Elizabeth B. Klerman, one of the authors of the study published online in the journal Lancet.
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NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | October 7, 2005
Melatonin, long known to insomniac Americans as an over-the-counter sleep aid, is now being studied as a way to prevent and treat breast and other cancers. Dubbed the "hormone of darkness," melatonin is a hormone that is made by the brain's pineal gland at nighttime. This summer, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, led by epidemiologist Dr. Eva Schernhammer, showed that women who produced the lowest levels of melatonin had a 70 percent higher chance of getting breast cancer than those with the highest levels.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | October 7, 2005
Melatonin, long known to insomniac Americans as an over-the-counter sleep aid, is now being studied as a way to prevent and treat breast and other cancers. Dubbed the "hormone of darkness," melatonin is a hormone that is made by the brain's pineal gland at nighttime. This summer, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, led by epidemiologist Dr. Eva Schernhammer, showed that women who produced the lowest levels of melatonin had a 70 percent higher chance of getting breast cancer than those with the highest levels.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 1996
One of my friends is taking melatonin and has urged me to do the same in order to protect against heart attacks and Alzheimer's disease. Do you agree that it is worthwhile to take melatonin?My short answer: No.Melatonin is a hormone produced by the tiny pineal gland located deep within the brain. The formation of melatonin is regulated by light -- melatonin is manufactured when it is dark, and its production is turned off by bright light. As a result, blood levels of melatonin follow a daily cyclical pattern.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2003
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University and National Institutes of Health have discovered a key step in how the body controls melatonin, the chemical that regulates the sleep-wake cycle. The knowledge could eventually help scientists come up with drugs to better treat sleep disorders, including insomnia, narcolepsy and jet lag. Published yesterday in the online edition of Nature Structural Biology, the paper identified the switch that destroys the enzyme controlling melatonin production.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Blackerby and Cheryl Blackerby,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 4, 1996
As soon as the 747 took off from New York's Kennedy Airport at 7 p.m., I put two small white tablets under my tongue and settled back in my seat to see what would happen.I was testing the new cure for jet lag -- melatonin -- a "miracle drug" that made the cover of Newsweek in November and was discussed recently on "Donahue."At least four recent books have touted the wonders of it, including "The Melatonin Miracle" by Walter Pierpaoli and William Regelson (Simon & Schuster; $21), which came out in August and made it to No. 3 on the New York Times best-seller list.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and By Delthia Ricks,Newsday | July 22, 2005
Night shift workers who had low levels of the body's vital "sleep hormone," were significantly more likely to develop breast cancer than those who were awake during the day but got plenty of shut-eye at night, a team of scientists reported this week. The analysis by Boston researchers goes straight to the heart of a question scientists have asked for years: Are night shift workers, because of extended exposure to light, more likely to develop cancer? "Two or three years ago, we probably would have been reluctant to say there was an association," said Dr. Eva Schernhammer, an epidemiologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital.
FEATURES
By New York Times | October 20, 1998
When Americans go off daylight-saving time at 2 a.m. on Sunday, they will need to set their clocks back an hour. That's easy. Harder for many is setting their body clocks back an hour.To the rescue: Dr. Alfred Lewy, a professor at Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland and an expert on resetting biological clocks.In April, Lewy proposed a system for speeding the adjustment to daylight time. Now he has a regimen to help people shift their body clocks the other way. It relies on the body's two main zeitgebers, or time keepers -- sunlight and the hormone melatonin, which is produced by a tiny gland at night.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 25, 2004
You recently wrote about a link between black cohosh and liver problems. I have a friend who has had hepatitis C for 23 years. She had been taking black cohosh for menopausal hot flashes, but her liver enzymes were high. When I read your column I e-mailed her, and she quit taking the herb. Today she phoned to tell me her liver enzymes are now down significantly. She credits quitting the black cohosh for this dramatic improvement. We both thank you. We are delighted to learn that your friend had such a positive outcome.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | September 18, 2005
I have fibromyalgia, and it disturbs my sleep. I take Lunesta for sleep every night (in addition to practicing healthy sleep habits). What is your opinion of the new medication Rozerem? Lunesta (eszopiclone) was hailed as the first sleeping pill to be approved for long-term use. It is being widely advertised. Side effects may include headache, dry mouth, drowsiness, indigestion and an unpleasant aftertaste. Rozerem (ramelteon) is new and should start showing up in pharmacies over the next several weeks.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and By Delthia Ricks,Newsday | July 22, 2005
Night shift workers who had low levels of the body's vital "sleep hormone," were significantly more likely to develop breast cancer than those who were awake during the day but got plenty of shut-eye at night, a team of scientists reported this week. The analysis by Boston researchers goes straight to the heart of a question scientists have asked for years: Are night shift workers, because of extended exposure to light, more likely to develop cancer? "Two or three years ago, we probably would have been reluctant to say there was an association," said Dr. Eva Schernhammer, an epidemiologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 25, 2004
You recently wrote about a link between black cohosh and liver problems. I have a friend who has had hepatitis C for 23 years. She had been taking black cohosh for menopausal hot flashes, but her liver enzymes were high. When I read your column I e-mailed her, and she quit taking the herb. Today she phoned to tell me her liver enzymes are now down significantly. She credits quitting the black cohosh for this dramatic improvement. We both thank you. We are delighted to learn that your friend had such a positive outcome.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | December 21, 2003
In a column I read, you suggested using diluted vinegar to eliminate dandruff. What measurement of vinegar to water do you recommend, and when is it used -- after the shampoo or before? I'd never heard of this remedy, and since normal dandruff shampoos do not seem to help me, I am anxious to try this new idea. A number of people have found that rinsing with dilute vinegar (either before or after shampooing) can discourage dandruff. The acidity makes it hard for yeast to thrive, and dandruff is caused at least in part by yeast that live on the skin.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2003
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University and National Institutes of Health have discovered a key step in how the body controls melatonin, the chemical that regulates the sleep-wake cycle. The knowledge could eventually help scientists come up with drugs to better treat sleep disorders, including insomnia, narcolepsy and jet lag. Published yesterday in the online edition of Nature Structural Biology, the paper identified the switch that destroys the enzyme controlling melatonin production.
NEWS
November 18, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a Boston Globe editorial, which was published Monday.A STUDY on aging and sleep published this month in the American Journal of Medicine belies a couple of popular myths: that the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin decreases as people get older and that a bottled version of the stuff is needed to correct the deficiency.Dr. Charles Czeisler of Harvard Medical School and his colleagues show that there is no problem. In sleep lab experiments, the researchers found that the melatonin levels of healthy people ages 65 to 81 matched those of people ages 18 to 30.So those ads hawking melatonin as a must-have supplement for anyone over 40 are akin to the babble of the old medicine wagon huckster.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1995
Seasonal cycles are known to influence everything from the sex lives of horses to the migration patterns of birds. Now a Johns Hopkins University researcher says that autumn's lengthening nights may trigger another important change: mobilizing the disease-fighting immune systems of various creatures, including humans, to face the onslaught of winter.The body appears to do this, said Randy J. Nelson, a professor of psychology at Hopkins, on cue from a hormone called melatonin. And to explain how this versatile chemical became a kind of seasonal alarm system, Dr. Nelson turns to no less an authority than Charles Darwin and his theory of evolution.
TRAVEL
By RANDI KEST | February 14, 1999
SEE WILLY -- AT HIS NEW HOMEA trip to visit ``Free Willy'' star Keiko at his new home in Iceland's Westmann Islands is being offered by Oceanic Society Expeditions. The killer whale's confinement in a small tank in Mexico City was the inspiration behind both the movie and a rescue effort to place him in a more natural habitat. After rehabilitation at the Oregon Coast Aquarium, he was returned to a sea pen in the waters off Iceland.Besides interacting with the famous whale, visitors on the May 30 to June 9 expedition will whale watch, search for dolphins and see many different species of birds.
FEATURES
By New York Times | October 20, 1998
When Americans go off daylight-saving time at 2 a.m. on Sunday, they will need to set their clocks back an hour. That's easy. Harder for many is setting their body clocks back an hour.To the rescue: Dr. Alfred Lewy, a professor at Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland and an expert on resetting biological clocks.In April, Lewy proposed a system for speeding the adjustment to daylight time. Now he has a regimen to help people shift their body clocks the other way. It relies on the body's two main zeitgebers, or time keepers -- sunlight and the hormone melatonin, which is produced by a tiny gland at night.
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