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NEWS
By NEWSDAY | August 11, 2005
The incidence of two forms of non-melanoma skin cancer has tripled among people younger than 40 - particularly women - an increase scientists attribute to tanning's continued allure and Earth's depleting ozone layer. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota say rates of basal and squamous cell carcinomas have risen drastically over the past quarter century, despite repeated public health messages about the importance of sunscreen and protective clothing. The two cancers normally are seen in people older than 50. On rare occasions, doctors said, the cancers have been diagnosed in teens and preteens.
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NEWS
February 23, 2014
Thanks for your recent editorial supporting a ban on indoor tanning by minors ("Ban the booth," Jan. 20). As a melanoma survivor, I know the pain and uncertainty of going through treatment for that illness. My melanoma was probably caused by years of being in the outdoors as a kid before sunscreen was even invented. I am grateful for the treatment I received at Johns Hopkins Hospital that saved my life, and I now volunteer for the American Cancer Society to help others fight cancer.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 1, 2012
Baltimore Ravens Offensive Coordinator Cam Cameron was a young coach at the University of Michigan when his then head coach Bo Schembechler noticed a spot on his back. The spot turned out to be a malignant mole and Cameron was diagnosed with stage 2 melanoma. Melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer. Cameron was treated and survived and is now speaking out about skin cancer. He will be featured in a 30-second public service announcement for the Joanna M. Nicolay Melanoma Foundation, a national nonprofit headquartered in Maryland that promoted melanoma research and prevention.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Catonsville will host an afternoon of high school basketball along with Seton Keough and Mount St. Joseph on Dec. 21 to benefit The Kropfelder Foundation for Melanoma Education and Research. Comets girls basketball coach Mike Mohler had been friends since high school with David Kropfelder, who died of melanoma in 2003. Kropfelder was a three-sport athlete at Mount St. Joseph and is in the Gaels Hall of Fame. He was a standout in soccer, basketball and baseball, Mohler said. “David was two years ahead of me at Mt. St. Joe,” Mohler said.
NEWS
August 19, 2000
MEDICAL authorities say 800 Marylanders will be diagnosed this year with melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer associated with prolonged exposure to the sun. Maryland's health secretary, Georges C. Benjamin, says melanoma is the fastest growing cancer in our state. Similar trends have been spotted nationally. In the nation, melanoma afflicts 45,000 persons each year. The figure is rising. Some 9,200 will die from it. This is the disease that has recurred in U.S. Sen. John McCain, the Navy POW hero and Republican candidate for president from Arizona.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
Jennifer Martin was 28 years old and three months pregnant when a doctor diagnosed her malignant melanoma, the most deadly type of skin cancer. Fifty years ago, the disease rarely struck people in their 20s. Now, it is one of the most common types of cancer in young women. In the past 20 years, the incidence of melanoma more than tripled in Caucasians. Nationwide, 51,400 new cases of melanoma are expected this year - a 9 percent increase over last year. Doctors have known for years that overexposure to the sun is a leading cause of melanoma and other skin cancers and have tried to spread the message that people should wear hats, apply sunscreen and stay out of the sun. Yet the public has been slow to react.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Reporter | September 23, 2005
As a young woman, Shonda Brewer Schilling loved the sun. Sometimes she would sneak onto the flat black roof of her parents' rowhouse in Dundalk, slather herself in baby oil and catch a few rays. Or she'd spend hours on the beach at Ocean City. Later, studying broadcast journalism at Towson University, she discovered that a tanning booth could help maintain her beautifully bronzed look year-round. She met baseball pitcher Curt Schilling, whose Boston Red Sox are in town this weekend, while he was playing for the Orioles and she was working in production for the cable network Home Team Sports.
NEWS
By Andrew Schaefer and Andrew Schaefer,sun reporter | April 27, 2007
Standing in front of a stage where she danced tap and ballet as a little girl at Colgate Elementary School in Dundalk, melanoma survivor Shonda Schilling held up two white plastic discs slathered with sunscreen and asked for volunteers to take them outside for 15 seconds. When the students came back inside, their classmates gasped to see that the UV light-sensitive discs had turned purple, except for the spots where Schilling applied sunscreen. Even on a cloudy day, the sun's rays went to work almost immediately - teaching the students a lesson Schilling, the wife of Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling, hopes they won't soon forget.
HEALTH
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
After her melanoma, Cheryl Stratos is mostly back to a normal life, running a business and driving her teenage son to weekend events, but there are reminders that it could all come back: The sores all over her body, the high fevers, the hair loss -- even the possibility of a suddenly shortened life. For Stratos, of Virginia, and others who have benefitted from a class of revolutionary anti-cancer drugs known as BRAF mutation inhibitors, another tool in the fight against relapse has just been sharpened: Drug maker GlaxoSmithKline received FDA approval Wednesday for a new cocktail that includes a BRAF-targeting component.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 26, 2012
The Baltimore Ravens will offer free skin cancer screenings before tomorrow night's game against the Cleveland Browns to help raise awareness about melanoma, the most common kind of skin cancer. Melanoma kills one American every hour, but can almost always be cured if caught early. Maryland ranks 11th in the country for incidence levels of the disease. Screening tets will bet set up from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. before the game at M&T Bank Stadium . The screenings will be done by licensed dermatologists.
HEALTH
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
After her melanoma, Cheryl Stratos is mostly back to a normal life, running a business and driving her teenage son to weekend events, but there are reminders that it could all come back: The sores all over her body, the high fevers, the hair loss -- even the possibility of a suddenly shortened life. For Stratos, of Virginia, and others who have benefitted from a class of revolutionary anti-cancer drugs known as BRAF mutation inhibitors, another tool in the fight against relapse has just been sharpened: Drug maker GlaxoSmithKline received FDA approval Wednesday for a new cocktail that includes a BRAF-targeting component.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 26, 2012
The Baltimore Ravens will offer free skin cancer screenings before tomorrow night's game against the Cleveland Browns to help raise awareness about melanoma, the most common kind of skin cancer. Melanoma kills one American every hour, but can almost always be cured if caught early. Maryland ranks 11th in the country for incidence levels of the disease. Screening tets will bet set up from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. before the game at M&T Bank Stadium . The screenings will be done by licensed dermatologists.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 1, 2012
Baltimore Ravens Offensive Coordinator Cam Cameron was a young coach at the University of Michigan when his then head coach Bo Schembechler noticed a spot on his back. The spot turned out to be a malignant mole and Cameron was diagnosed with stage 2 melanoma. Melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer. Cameron was treated and survived and is now speaking out about skin cancer. He will be featured in a 30-second public service announcement for the Joanna M. Nicolay Melanoma Foundation, a national nonprofit headquartered in Maryland that promoted melanoma research and prevention.
NEWS
April 13, 2009
Produce-linked food poisonings on the rise Americans didn't suffer more food poisoning last year despite high-profile outbreaks involving peppers, peanut butter and other foods, according to a new government report. Rates of food-borne illnesses have been holding steady for four years. They had been declining from the mid-1990s until the beginning of this decade, mainly because of improvements in the meat and poultry industry, some experts say. But produce-associated food poisonings have been increasing, and the nation is no longer making progress against food-borne disease rates, said Elliot Ryser, a professor of food science at Michigan State University.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 11, 2008
Melanoma rates have risen almost 50 percent among young women in the U.S. since 1980, a trend that may be related to an increase in the use of tanning parlors and exposure to the sun's damaging rays, according to a report released yesterday. Among young men, melanoma rates have remained steady, the report found. The most lethal of the skin cancers, melanoma occurs in pigment-producing skin cells. The American Cancer Society estimates that 62,480 new cases and 8,420 deaths will occur from melanoma in the U.S. this year.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Jonathan Bor and Stephanie Desmon and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporters | May 24, 2008
Despite Sen. John McCain's three bouts with melanoma - including a surgery in 2000 that left his cheek visibly scarred - the presumptive Republican presidential nominee's doctors yesterday declared him cancer-free and in general good health. The Arizona senator's medical history puts him at increased risk for future skin cancer, so he sees his dermatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., every three to four months. This year, he had a minor skin cancer removed from his lower leg. "At the present time, Senator McCain enjoys excellent health and displays extraordinary energy," Dr. John D. Eckstein, McCain's internist at the Mayo Clinic, told reporters yesterday.
NEWS
May 12, 2006
On May 6, 2006, STEVEN CURTIS MARSHALL, beloved husband of Teresa Marshall, stepson of Margaret Taylor Marshall, son of Shirley Stevenson and brother of Gray, Andrew and Bradley Marshall. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Melanoma Research Foundation, the African Wildlife Foundation or the Children's Hunger Fund.
NEWS
December 25, 1997
Hellen B. Smyth, an accomplished horsewoman and homemaker, died of melanoma Friday at Happy Hopeful Farm in Cockeysville. She was 46.Her lifelong interest in horseback riding began as a 4-year-old growing up at Happy Hopeful Farm, where she lived her entire life. She entered riding competitions with several of her thoroughbreds, including Central Park, All of the Sudden and Whiphand. She stopped competing this summer after being diagnosed with melanoma.In 1969, the former Hellen Burns graduated from Garrison Forest School and made her debut at the Bachelors Cotillon.
NEWS
April 19, 2008
DANNY FEDERICI, 58 Rock musician Danny Federici, the longtime keyboard player for Bruce Springsteen whose stylish work helped define the E Street Band's sound on hits from "Hungry Heart" through "The Rising," died Thursday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He had suffered from melanoma for three years. News of his death was posted late Thursday on Mr. Springsteen's Web site. He last performed with Mr. Springsteen and the band last month.
FEATURES
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun reporter | June 21, 2007
Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer and melanoma is its deadliest form. "In 2007, over 100,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed, with over half of them being invasive [beyond the top layer of the skin]," says Dr. Jennifer Cooper, a dermatologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center. "Over 8,000 people are expected to die from melanoma this year. So educating people [about] what to look for and when to see their doctor is critical so that skin cancer can be detected in early stages."
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