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Melanie Smith

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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2004
IT WAS 13 YEARS between interviews with Melanie Smith. The first time, she was a shy 17-year-old, the 1991 valedictorian at Baltimore's Western High School. Clearly, she was going places. She had already won $5,000 at an international science fair. Freeman A. Hrabowski III, then executive vice president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and Del. Howard P. Rawlings had persuaded Smith to enter "M-3," the third class of a new program designed to attract African-Americans to the study of science, mathematics and engineering at UMBC.
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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2004
IT WAS 13 YEARS between interviews with Melanie Smith. The first time, she was a shy 17-year-old, the 1991 valedictorian at Baltimore's Western High School. Clearly, she was going places. She had already won $5,000 at an international science fair. Freeman A. Hrabowski III, then executive vice president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and Del. Howard P. Rawlings had persuaded Smith to enter "M-3," the third class of a new program designed to attract African-Americans to the study of science, mathematics and engineering at UMBC.
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NEWS
By Mark Bomster | May 29, 1991
Melanie Smith held a fidgety white mouse in her hands as she discussed brain chemistry, behavioral conditioning and neuroscience."When I was younger, when I saw a mouse, I used to jump on the table," said Smith, this year's valedictorian at Western High School. "I think I've progressed from that."That's an understatement.Just two weeks ago, Smith won a $5,000 scholarship at the 42nd International Science and Engineering Fair in Orlando, Fla., for her prize-winning entry, "The Effects of Abnormal Brain Development on the Behavior of Mice."
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2000
MELANIE SMITH has been singing since she was a little girl. Her father was a professor of vocal music at Arizona State University, and Smith loved the time she spent with him, training her naturally beautiful voice. Smith became a bank examiner for the federal government, but continued to sing, focusing on liturgical music. She has been a cantor since 1983, beginning in a parish in Oklahoma. In 1991, she moved to Crofton and became a cantor at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Roman Catholic Church and a member of the contemporary choir.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2000
MELANIE SMITH has been singing since she was a little girl. Her father was a professor of vocal music at Arizona State University, and Smith loved the time she spent with him, training her naturally beautiful voice. Smith became a bank examiner for the federal government, but continued to sing, focusing on liturgical music. She has been a cantor since 1983, beginning in a parish in Oklahoma. In 1991, she moved to Crofton and became a cantor at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Roman Catholic Church and a member of the contemporary choir.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | June 9, 1991
Her counselor calls her a renaissance woman. Her principal is reminded of a flower, once furled, now bursting into full bloom. When she graduates today from Western High School -- valedictorian, student body president, winner of an international science prize -- Melanie Smith will epitomize the very best to those who have shared her success.There will be the teachers and principal who nurtured her, the counselor who let her talk out her problems, the scientist who helped her win money and recognition and a new sense of direction, the school bureaucrats who promoted her achievements and helped her attract a full university scholarship to study to be a doctor.
NEWS
September 16, 1999
Four Baltimore County residents were arrested and a fifth was being sought in the armed robbery yesterday morning of a Harford County convenience store.State police in Bel Air said a Royal Farms store in Churchville was robbed about 1: 25 a.m. Police stopped a 1999 Toyota Corolla traveling south on Interstate 95 in Joppa and arrested three occupants. Two others fled into a nearby woods. Hours later, one of them was arrested at his Essex home.Charged in connection with the robbery and held at the Harford County Detention Center were Melanie L. Smith, 19, of the first block of Hedgeford Court; Mark B. Topfer, 18, of the first block of Waldmann Mill Court; and Ronald R. Jackson, 19, of the first block of Bellington Court, all of Perry Hall; and William Burr, 20, of the 2000 block of Firethorn Road, Essex.
NEWS
By Mary C. Schneidau and Mary C. Schneidau,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2004
Mary Sharps dreamed of owning a home for years, but banks always refused her request for a mortgage. So the 42-year-old turned to the Anne Arundel Habitat for Humanity. "I am so excited," Sharps said yesterday, as she began a week of vacation from her job at Anne Arundel Medical Center to work on the Habitat home in Pumphrey near the Baltimore border, which she will share with her two sons and three grandchildren. Sharps, who is helping to build her new home, is expected to move in in December.
NEWS
March 20, 2000
Julia Anne Deuso, 59, homemaker, registered nurse Julia Anne Deuso, a homemaker and registered nurse, died Friday of a brain tumor at home in Arnold. She was 59. As a registered nurse, she worked privately for elderly patients. She was active in many projects at St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church in Severna Park, and she enjoyed playing bridge. The Cincinnati native graduated from Rhode Island College School of Nursing. A Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 10 a.m. Wednesday at St. John the Evangelist Church, Ritchie Highway at Cypress Creek Road.
NEWS
By Mary C. Schneidau and Mary C. Schneidau,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2004
Mary Sharps dreamed of owning a home for years, but banks always refused her request for a mortgage. So the 42-year-old turned to the Anne Arundel Habitat for Humanity. "I am so excited," Sharps said yesterday, as she began a week of vacation from her job at Anne Arundel Medical Center to work on the Habitat home in Pumphrey near the Baltimore border, which she will share with her two sons and three grandchildren. Sharps, who is helping to build her new home, is expected to move in in December.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | June 9, 1991
Her counselor calls her a renaissance woman. Her principal is reminded of a flower, once furled, now bursting into full bloom. When she graduates today from Western High School -- valedictorian, student body president, winner of an international science prize -- Melanie Smith will epitomize the very best to those who have shared her success.There will be the teachers and principal who nurtured her, the counselor who let her talk out her problems, the scientist who helped her win money and recognition and a new sense of direction, the school bureaucrats who promoted her achievements and helped her attract a full university scholarship to study to be a doctor.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster | May 29, 1991
Melanie Smith held a fidgety white mouse in her hands as she discussed brain chemistry, behavioral conditioning and neuroscience."When I was younger, when I saw a mouse, I used to jump on the table," said Smith, this year's valedictorian at Western High School. "I think I've progressed from that."That's an understatement.Just two weeks ago, Smith won a $5,000 scholarship at the 42nd International Science and Engineering Fair in Orlando, Fla., for her prize-winning entry, "The Effects of Abnormal Brain Development on the Behavior of Mice."
EXPLORE
August 12, 2011
The Cal Ripken World Series opened for the 12th time Friday night, the ninth time in Aberdeen, with a ceremony in front of hundreds of fans from the United States and other countries at the Ripken Academy in Aberdeen. Players, coaches, ambassadors and bat boys from all 16 teams paraded around the complex into Ripken Stadium, before returning to Cal Sr.'s Yard, where each team was introduced and each manager was awarded a participation plaque. While parading was going on, students from Chung's Martial Arts displayed board breaking moves and other forms from Tae Kwon Do. Fourteen-year-old Melanie Smith performed the national anthem.
NEWS
February 16, 1997
Westminster City Police Department has graduated about 160 East Middle School sixth-graders from its Project DARE program.DARE -- or drug abuse resistance education -- is given to middle school students to try to keep them from trying drugs, alcohol and tobacco.The DARE graduating students were:Heather Adkins, Tessea Antonis-Parr, Stephanie Briscoe, Jennifer Digangi, Melissa Dodge, Jacqueline Dustin, Laura Gibson, Britni Isaac, Kimberly Kraft, Rebekah Krolus, Lauren Papi, Amanda Pollard, Tabitha Peed, Jennifer Sipes, Crystal Slater, Reba Jade Smith, Julianne Wagner, Alycia Woodring.
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