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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 26, 1993
"Born Yesterday" isn't to be confused with an actual comedy, but it's nevertheless an amusingly cynical romp through the byways of the glossy town 40 miles to the south. Derived from a 1950 movie that starred Broderick Crawford, Judy Holliday and William Holden, this version offers, respectively, John Goodman, Melanie Griffith and Don Johnson. Of the three, two are net plusses and one is a slight minus.As far back as the '50s -- probably the 1850s, come to think of it -- writers had seen through the hoax of D.C. and realized that behind those marble statues and Doric pillars stood sleazebags, hucksters, peddlers, racketeers and bullyboys, and that the loudest and the slickest of them usually ended up with the most toys.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 19, 2002
Stuart Little 2 holds firmly to the law of diminishing returns when it comes to movie sequels: Content to strive for nothing more than a replication of the earlier success, it manages to pretty much ignore all the strengths of the earlier film while exacerbating all its faults. We get to see all manner of close-ups of the adorable little Stuart, a mouse who's been adopted and is being raised as one of their own by the very human (and, of course, very humane) Little family. Which serves to remind us that mice - even computer-generated mice - do not have the most expressive faces.
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
Melanie Griffith, stick thin, all in black, a dazzling diamond crucifix against her throat, is right here in front of Planet Hollywood at the Inner Harbor.You'd think this would be the ultimate glam fix for the nearly 400 stargazers clustered by the stage and gawking from store windows and staircases.So, why is a mouthy band of fans asking for her hot Latin husband, Antonio Banderas?"You want Antonio?" the movie star asks in her baby bird voice. Yes, it is her real voice."I want Antonio too, believe me," she says with a smile almost as bright as the mango-sized diamonds in her ears.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 8, 2000
In "Cecil B. Demented," the latest offering from Baltimore director John Waters, an underground filmmaker (Stephen Dorff) kidnaps a big Hollywood star (Melanie Griffith) and forces her to appear in his next flick. After spending time with the soundtrack album, you might wonder why he didn't grab a few pop stars while he was at it. The songs on "Cecil B. Demented: Music from the Motion Picture" (RCA Victor 09026-63722, arriving in stores today) aren't just noisy and annoying; they're amateurishly so, drawing on rap and club music, thrash and noise rock without doing any of them well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By The Hollywood Reporter | July 7, 1995
Jeremy Irons is in final negotiations to star in Adrian Lyne's remake of Stanley Kubrick's 1962 classic dark comedy "Lolita."Sources said that Mr. Irons will play the part of Humbert Humbert, a gentle English professor whose life turns tragic because of his passionate love for a 12-year-old nymphet and the vengeful determination of the girl's sleazy but canny former lover.While Dianne Wiest initially had been considered for the role of Lolita's mother, sources said that discussions are under way to bring Melanie Griffith on board.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 17, 1992
If I were a rich man, I wouldn't have had to see "A Stranger Among Us." Lord, I ask You: Would it have mattered so much?You go to a mystery with cops and guns and murders, set on the mean streets of New York City, good dirty fun, but "Fiddler on the Roof" keeps breaking out. It's "Lethal Shiksa."Melanie Griffith plays a tough New York police detective who, after shooting a fleeing suspect, is sent not to jail but to Brooklyn to investigate a missing person in the close-knit, mysterious Hasidic community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Orlando Sentinel | October 4, 1991
This Mary Agnes Donoghue thing is getting out of hand.For those who haven't been alerted yet, Ms. Donoghue is a writer who specializes in screenplays that glorify self-dramatizing and/or self-pitying characters. That was certainly true of the 1988 Bette Midler-Barbara Hershey weeper "Beaches," and it is also true of "Deceived" -- although the recent thriller is so implausible that Goldie Hawn's character is almost the least of its problems.In "Paradise," the Mary Agnes Donoghue formula is very pure because she not only wrote the film, she also directed it. What's more, two of its stars are children, which means that they were particularly dependent on the filmmaker to shape their performances.
NEWS
By Helene Lorber and Helene Lorber,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 4, 1993
AFTER ALL THESE YEARSSusan IsaacsHarperCollins343 pages. $23 Susan Isaacs' characters in "After All These Years" are back where and when they belong -- present-day Long Island. No more nasty Nazis, as in "Shining Through"; our villains are social climbers and corporate raiders.The eternal Isaacs heroine is firmly in place. This time she's an up-from-Brooklyn English teacher whose math-teacher husband has climbed to the top of the business world as founder of a high-tech research company. Rosie and Richie Meyers move to a Gatsby-esque enclave where she feels out of place, and he feels he's only begun.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | October 4, 1991
It takes courage to do a tear-jerker today, but apparently Mary Agnes Donoghue has that kind of courage. Her ''Paradise'' is a weepie.Donoghue wrote the scripts for ''Beaches'' and ''Deceived,'' but this is her first job as director, and she's done quite well. If you like tear-jerkers, this one has been very tastefully and artfully managed.It has a French feel that comes naturally. ''Paradise'' is an American remake of the 1987 film ''Le Grand Chemin.''The principal character is a 10-year-old boy whose mother is about to have another baby and wants to be free of complications because she already has enough.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 28, 1990
It takes too long for the victim to turn on the aggressor in ''Pacific Heights,'' and consequently the film, one that could have been most satisfactory, is only partly so.Melanie Griffith and Matthew Modine are the young couple who buy a house in San Francisco for some $700,000. They can't afford it, but they think they'll be able to make the monthly payments if they rent out two apartments.A nice Asian couple moves into one. A psychopath moves into the other. Played by Michael Keaton, he is seemingly nice, but any fool could see through him. In defense of the landlords, they do see through him, but the guy is just a little too crafty for them.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
Melanie Griffith, stick thin, all in black, a dazzling diamond crucifix against her throat, is right here in front of Planet Hollywood at the Inner Harbor.You'd think this would be the ultimate glam fix for the nearly 400 stargazers clustered by the stage and gawking from store windows and staircases.So, why is a mouthy band of fans asking for her hot Latin husband, Antonio Banderas?"You want Antonio?" the movie star asks in her baby bird voice. Yes, it is her real voice."I want Antonio too, believe me," she says with a smile almost as bright as the mango-sized diamonds in her ears.
FEATURES
By Susan Milligan and Susan Milligan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 1996
BUDAPEST -- On the weekend President Clinton came to Hungary, there was a line of many hundreds of locals waiting for four hours for their chance to get close to an American celebrity.The throng wasn't vying to see Mr. Clinton -- whose appearance was barely noted here. Madonna is coming, and this was the day that producers of the film "Evita," starring the flamboyant pop singer and Spanish heart-throb Antonio Banderas, were casting extras for the movie.The rules were straightforward: You had to be between 30 and 70, able to sing in English and possibly to dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By The Hollywood Reporter | July 7, 1995
Jeremy Irons is in final negotiations to star in Adrian Lyne's remake of Stanley Kubrick's 1962 classic dark comedy "Lolita."Sources said that Mr. Irons will play the part of Humbert Humbert, a gentle English professor whose life turns tragic because of his passionate love for a 12-year-old nymphet and the vengeful determination of the girl's sleazy but canny former lover.While Dianne Wiest initially had been considered for the role of Lolita's mother, sources said that discussions are under way to bring Melanie Griffith on board.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 29, 1993
Posse(PolyGram, $94.99, rated R) 1993Black actors have appeared in many Westerns and sometimes had sizable roles, such as Danny Glover in "Silverado" and Roscoe Lee Brown in the John Wayne movie, "The Cowboys."But in "Posse," most of the cast is black, as is the director, Mario Van Peebles. Van Peebles also stars as legendary gunfighter Jessie Lee. When the film begins, set against the backdrop of the Civil War, Lee is under the charge of a ruthless U.S. colonel who has tricked Lee and his gang into becoming outlaws for the colonel's personal gain.
NEWS
By Helene Lorber and Helene Lorber,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 4, 1993
AFTER ALL THESE YEARSSusan IsaacsHarperCollins343 pages. $23 Susan Isaacs' characters in "After All These Years" are back where and when they belong -- present-day Long Island. No more nasty Nazis, as in "Shining Through"; our villains are social climbers and corporate raiders.The eternal Isaacs heroine is firmly in place. This time she's an up-from-Brooklyn English teacher whose math-teacher husband has climbed to the top of the business world as founder of a high-tech research company. Rosie and Richie Meyers move to a Gatsby-esque enclave where she feels out of place, and he feels he's only begun.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 26, 1993
"Born Yesterday" isn't to be confused with an actual comedy, but it's nevertheless an amusingly cynical romp through the byways of the glossy town 40 miles to the south. Derived from a 1950 movie that starred Broderick Crawford, Judy Holliday and William Holden, this version offers, respectively, John Goodman, Melanie Griffith and Don Johnson. Of the three, two are net plusses and one is a slight minus.As far back as the '50s -- probably the 1850s, come to think of it -- writers had seen through the hoax of D.C. and realized that behind those marble statues and Doric pillars stood sleazebags, hucksters, peddlers, racketeers and bullyboys, and that the loudest and the slickest of them usually ended up with the most toys.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 21, 1990
Call it "Bonfire of the Calamities." Brian De Palma's version of the great, tough Tom Wolfe best seller "Bonfire of the Vanities" has been turned into a pie-fight. You could say, Send in the Clowns, except that the clowns are already there.De Palma is clearly frightened by the book, and so it is fair to inquire why he made the movie in the first place. There can be no answer, but certainly never has a director worked more assiduously to subvert the vision of the book he is charged with adapting and never has one copped out more insipidly at the end.Wolfe's panoramic chronicle of New York City in the grip of racial paranoia and social disintegration watched as a smug WASP bond trader was, after a moment's bad judgment, brought low by venal, barbaric forces.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 28, 1990
'Pacific Heights'Starring Michael Keaton and Melanie Griffith.Directed by John Schlesinger.Released by 20th-Century Fox.Rated R.** 1/2In "Pacific Heights," Mr. Bland builds his dream house and Mr. Nightmare takes it from him.This mordant thriller has a nifty, original premise and an intriguing set of antagonists. It pits life-loving, planet-friendly yuppies against a psychopath in a game of wits and escalating violence in the battleground of California real estate law. Unfortunately, toward the end it gives up on cleverness and menace and simply becomes another horror picture.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 17, 1992
If I were a rich man, I wouldn't have had to see "A Stranger Among Us." Lord, I ask You: Would it have mattered so much?You go to a mystery with cops and guns and murders, set on the mean streets of New York City, good dirty fun, but "Fiddler on the Roof" keeps breaking out. It's "Lethal Shiksa."Melanie Griffith plays a tough New York police detective who, after shooting a fleeing suspect, is sent not to jail but to Brooklyn to investigate a missing person in the close-knit, mysterious Hasidic community.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | October 4, 1991
It takes courage to do a tear-jerker today, but apparently Mary Agnes Donoghue has that kind of courage. Her ''Paradise'' is a weepie.Donoghue wrote the scripts for ''Beaches'' and ''Deceived,'' but this is her first job as director, and she's done quite well. If you like tear-jerkers, this one has been very tastefully and artfully managed.It has a French feel that comes naturally. ''Paradise'' is an American remake of the 1987 film ''Le Grand Chemin.''The principal character is a 10-year-old boy whose mother is about to have another baby and wants to be free of complications because she already has enough.
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