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By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
M el Brooks is singing into the telephone. "He vas a bully und a brute, he vas as crazy as a coot," the comic half-growls, impersonating an elderly Transylvanian housekeeper. "Still, I didn't give a hoot - he vas my boyfriend." The fabled filmmaker/Broadway producer is 83 and still has most of his factory-issued parts, so it's not surprising that the pipes occasionally show a speck or two of rust. Besides, Brooks was giving this impromptu concert strictly for educational purposes, to illustrate a point about the musical stage version of "Young Frankenstein."
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
You cannot understand American humor in the second half of the 20th Century without appreciating the crazed genius of Mel Brooks. And "American Masters" does an all-out appreciation at 9 p.m. Monday (May 20) on PBS. Here's a podcast of my preview from WYPR (88.1).   #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; } #sigheadshot{ float: left; margin: 0px 10px 0px 0px; } #sigtwitter { margin-right: 5px; } #sigtooltip { padding: 5px; border-radius: 5px; -moz-border-radius: 5px; -webkit-border-radius: 5px; }
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By ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | April 16, 1999
Hollywood and Broadway have been heavily into cross-fertilization over the last few years, and with the likes of "The Lion King" packing tourists into Great White Way outposts it seems only natural that one of the most notorious musicals never to play Broadway finally seems destined to open there.Mel Brooks is getting ready to bring "Springtime for Hitler," the underlying subject of his hilarious 1968 feature, "The Producers," to Broadway. The movie was about Max, a crooked producer with a plan to overfinance a can't-fail-to-miss musical.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Mel Brooks is singing into the telephone. "He vas a bully und a brute, he vas as crazy as a coot," the comic half-growls, impersonating an elderly Transylvanian housekeeper. "Still, I didn't give a hoot - he vas my boyfriend." The fabled filmmaker/Broadway producer is 83 and still has most of his factory-issued parts, so it's not surprising that the pipes occasionally show a speck or two of rust. Besides, Brooks was giving this impromptu concert strictly for educational purposes, to illustrate a point about the musical stage version of "Young Frankenstein."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
You cannot understand American humor in the second half of the 20th Century without appreciating the crazed genius of Mel Brooks. And "American Masters" does an all-out appreciation at 9 p.m. Monday (May 20) on PBS. Here's a podcast of my preview from WYPR (88.1).   #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; } #sigheadshot{ float: left; margin: 0px 10px 0px 0px; } #sigtwitter { margin-right: 5px; } #sigtooltip { padding: 5px; border-radius: 5px; -moz-border-radius: 5px; -webkit-border-radius: 5px; }
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1995
Maybe this film should be called "Mel Brooks, Dead and Loving It."Written off by a generation of movie critics that thinks "Nixon" is a great movie, he's recovered enough of the form that made him so beloved in the '70s and '80s. No one in any semblance of a right mind would confuse "Dracula, Dead and Loving It" with "Young Frankenstein" or "The Producers," but it's easily his best movie since then.Brooks seems to have made up his mind who he is. He's not imitating his imitators any more, he's back to imitating himself, always a sound career move.
SPORTS
By New York Daily News | October 25, 1992
Mel Brooks, the director of the classic comedies "Blazing Saddles" and "Young Frankenstein," began showing up at race tracks last year because a friend bought a horse. He doesn't bet much. He doesn't spend much time handicapping.When other friends buy horses, he bets those horses. He bets on trainers who train for his friends. He bets on jockeys who ride for his friends. He's loyal.He bets tips and doesn't recommend it. He likes to look at horses, he says, but he isn't buying one himself, forget it. "I think when God figured out what to make that's really gorgeous," Brooks said, "it's a horse.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 4, 2004
Theater-goers got a surprise at the New Year's Eve performance of The Producers on Broadway. So did the cast. During the second act, Mel Brooks - the show's songwriter, co-librettist and creator of the movie on which the show is based - slipped backstage, grabbed the robe worn by the actor who usually plays the judge and went on in his place. "It was good to be the judge," Brooks recalls with glee. "When Nathan [Lane, the show's Broadway star] would ad-lib, I'd take my gavel and say, `No ad-libbing in this courtroom.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1998
The 2000 Year Old Man, on how this millennium compares to the last: "This is much better, much better, because people are free, they're sexually liberated. In the first one, they said, 'Don't you dare touch that.' And now they say, 'Touch it, touch it, touch it.' I am so happy to be able to fool around. And in the first millennium, did they have a thing called Viagra? Well, they've got it now, and I'm hanging my hat on it. Things are looking very good." For a couple of guys working off the tops of their heads, Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner have done all right for themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 10, 2001
So, how great a show is "The Producers"? Exactly one week ago, the musical based on Mel Brooks' 1968 movie won 12 Tony Awards (including best musical) -- the largest number in Broadway history. But that doesn't mean "The Producers" is the greatest Broadway musical ever written. Nor does it mean it's automatically greater than the previous record holder, "Hello, Dolly!", which won 10 Tonys in 1964. To keep the hoopla in proportion, it helps to recall that even Brooks, in accepting the award for best score, said, "This is just a phenomenon this year, so forgive us for that."
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | October 22, 2007
Jerry Hall, the tall, terrific bombshell who grew up in one of my own Texas hometowns (Gonzales, population 5,000) is getting a rumored $2 million advance to write her life story for HarperCollins. And we all know that the fact this dynamo was married to Mick Jagger and had four children with him between 1990 and 1999 is partly the reason for this magnificent money and interest. Jerry has remained on the periphery of the newsworthy Rolling Stones for years. She is 51 years old now, and Mick is 64. It took Mick's fathering a child by Brazilian model Luciana Morad in 1999 to force Jerry to the divorce court.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 4, 2007
FOR MEL BROOKS, IT WAS ANYTHING Goes. For director Robert Longbottom it was No, No Nanette. For songwriter Stephen Schwartz it was the short-lived Shinbone Alley. And for me, it was Carnival. For many children, musicals aren't merely entertainment, they're the embodiment of a yearning that can last -- and shape -- a lifetime. Even now, these theater artists get a wistful tone in their voices when they recall those early, eye-popping experiences. CARNIVAL / / Through March 11 / / Kennedy Center / / 800-444-1324 or kennedy-center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 13, 2006
The Mel Brooks Collection [20th Century Fox] $100 You still laugh like crazy when you watch the Spanish Inquisition song-and-dance number in Mel Brooks' 1981 pastiche, History of the World: Part I. But these days, you also feel an ever-so-faint chill creeping up your back. Sure, Brooks got away with such roughhousing 25 years ago. By that time, it was what people expected from him. But if real-life religious intolerance ever again reached the extremes of 16th-century Spain, Brooks would be tossed in irons for his cheekiness.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 20, 2006
New York-- --For years, the great shortcoming of Susan Stroman's professional life was that she was born too late to follow in the big-screen dance steps of Busby Berkeley, Stanley Donen and Vincente Minnelli. They were the great musical directors and choreographers, the talent behind movie classics like 42nd Street, Singin' in the Rain and Meet Me in St. Louis. It was their brand of movie magic - the kaleidoscopic chorus girls, the brightly colored sets, the full-throated musical numbers - that riveted her attention as a young girl, that made her believe dreams could come true if you had a song in your heart and a tap in your shoe.
FEATURES
By AMY BIANCOLLI and AMY BIANCOLLI,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | December 26, 2005
Suggest to Matthew Broderick that he can sing and dance. Imply that he might be good at it. Then ask why, after two Broadway musicals, one made-for-TV Music Man and now a crooning, tapping turn in The Producers, he still won't call himself a song-and-dance man. "I don't resist it. I mean, nothing would make me happier," says Broderick, 43, as unpretentious and polite in life as he comes across on screen. "It's just that there are song-and-dance men who have been dancing their whole lives, who have actual taps on their shoes and things like that.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 4, 2004
Theater-goers got a surprise at the New Year's Eve performance of The Producers on Broadway. So did the cast. During the second act, Mel Brooks - the show's songwriter, co-librettist and creator of the movie on which the show is based - slipped backstage, grabbed the robe worn by the actor who usually plays the judge and went on in his place. "It was good to be the judge," Brooks recalls with glee. "When Nathan [Lane, the show's Broadway star] would ad-lib, I'd take my gavel and say, `No ad-libbing in this courtroom.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 6, 2001
Baltimore County Council will approve a needed new jail as long as it is in Baltimore City or, better yet, Pennsylvania. In redistricting, Towson gets three Council members and Woodlawn-Randallstown none. So what's wrong with that? The president will protect the environment of any state where a brother of his is in need of re-election. Adolf Hitler is not funny. Mel Brooks is really not funny. Nathan Lane is funny.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 4, 2007
FOR MEL BROOKS, IT WAS ANYTHING Goes. For director Robert Longbottom it was No, No Nanette. For songwriter Stephen Schwartz it was the short-lived Shinbone Alley. And for me, it was Carnival. For many children, musicals aren't merely entertainment, they're the embodiment of a yearning that can last -- and shape -- a lifetime. Even now, these theater artists get a wistful tone in their voices when they recall those early, eye-popping experiences. CARNIVAL / / Through March 11 / / Kennedy Center / / 800-444-1324 or kennedy-center.
NEWS
December 25, 2002
Anne Carlsen, 87, who was born without hands or feet and gained national acclaim as a teacher of handicapped children, died Sunday in Jamestown, N.D. She was a teacher, principal and administrator for more than 40 years at the Jamestown school that now bears her name. Former Gov. William Guy awarded her the Theodore Roosevelt Rough Rider Award, which is North Dakota's highest honor, in 1966. Ms. Carlsen was the youngest of six children. Her mother died when she was 4 and her father became the guiding influence in her life.
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