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Mein Kampf

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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Talk about eclectic. In the basement office of the Baltimore Book Co., Chris Bready shows off a framed picture of baseball legend Rogers Hornsby (the signature is faked), a Simpsons wall clock (Homer's eyes follow a circling doughnut), and a hockey puck bearing the logo of the old Baltimore Skipjacks. "Everybody needs a place where they can keep the stuff they love the most," says Bready, 56, who has run his auction house out of this cluttered North Charles Street location for the past 16 years.
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NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | September 29, 2006
Hating Jews, on racial as well as religious grounds, is as old as the Roman destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem. Later in Europe, pogroms and the Holocaust were the natural devolution of that elemental venom. Anti-Semitism after World War II often avoided the burning crosses and Nazi ranting. It often appeared as a more subtle animosity, fueled by envy of successful Jews in the West. "The good people, the nice people" often were the culprits, according to a character in the 1947 film Gentleman's Agreement, which dealt with the American aristocracy's social shunning of Jews.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2004
Craig Eisendrath One of the most damaging books in history was Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf, which in the early 1920s proclaimed Hitler's anti-Semitism, worship of power and strategy for world domination. Once in power, Hitler and his party, guided by this book, established the National Socialist regime, which led to the concentration camps and World War II. Craig Eisendrath wrote At War With Time: Western Thought From the Sages to the 21st Century and The Unifying Moment: The Psychological Philosophy of William James and Alfred North Whitehead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Talk about eclectic. In the basement office of the Baltimore Book Co., Chris Bready shows off a framed picture of baseball legend Rogers Hornsby (the signature is faked), a Simpsons wall clock (Homer's eyes follow a circling doughnut), and a hockey puck bearing the logo of the old Baltimore Skipjacks. "Everybody needs a place where they can keep the stuff they love the most," says Bready, 56, who has run his auction house out of this cluttered North Charles Street location for the past 16 years.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 26, 1991
"Frontline's" "The Mind of Hussein" never quite lives up to the promise of its title. But the report, which airs at 9 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67), is still smart and engaging television.The topic is a fascinating one and about as timely as you can get. In terms of execution, there is some good research, and it is presented in a way that goes down easy.Host Hodding Carter admits almost nothing is known about Hussein's early years. But once the report gets to Hussein's teen years as a thug, it starts to rock and roll.
NEWS
By Sidney Zion | May 2, 1999
IN THE beginning, Cain slew Abel. So how come God didn't punish Adam and Eve? They had eaten the forbidden fruit and should have known that Cain had a serious case of sibling rivalry that might easily develop into fratricide. But the Lord, in His infinite wisdom, gave the first parents a pass, despite their obvious retreat into denial. Now, on the eve of the so-called 21st century, in the wake of the high school massacre in Colorado, President Clinton proposes felony prosecutions against parents who allow their children to have guns that end up causing death or injury.
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | September 29, 2006
Hating Jews, on racial as well as religious grounds, is as old as the Roman destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem. Later in Europe, pogroms and the Holocaust were the natural devolution of that elemental venom. Anti-Semitism after World War II often avoided the burning crosses and Nazi ranting. It often appeared as a more subtle animosity, fueled by envy of successful Jews in the West. "The good people, the nice people" often were the culprits, according to a character in the 1947 film Gentleman's Agreement, which dealt with the American aristocracy's social shunning of Jews.
TOPIC
By Ishmael Reed | May 30, 1999
THE LATEST SPATE of school shootings has been followed by the same vacuous media commentaries that accompanied earlier trag-edies. Generally, television and movies have gotten the blame for inspiring the young shooters.The commentators ignore the fact that during the nation's bloodiest century, the 19th, neither television nor radio was around when rival white ethnic gangsters in Northeastern cities littered the streets with corpses.On April 20 at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
Reporter: I'm having lunch with Christopher Hitchens on Monday.Friend of Hitchens: Take your Alka-Seltzer.Reporter: Oh, I won't try to keep up with him.FOH: There's no question of one's keeping up with him.Reporter: I probably won't drink at all. I don't when I'm working.FOH: Then you won't have an authentic Christopher Hitchens experience.Reporter: Are you saying I should plan on taking the train, so I won't have to worry about driving back?FOH: I think that would be best. My authentic Christopher Hitchens experience begins in Timberlake's, an unpretentious place in Washington, where he has taught the bartender to make unassailable Tanqueray martinis.
NEWS
August 25, 1996
Lillian Clark,70, a big band singer who recorded with Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong, died Tuesday in New York of cancer. Born Autilia Ventimiglia, she studied at the Julliard School, intending to become a classical pianist. However, when one of the members of the Clark Sisters left the popular singing group, she auditioned, got the job and changed her name.Alberto Gonzalez,33, the first man in the United States convicted of attempted murder for having unprotected sex while carrying the AIDS virus, died Friday of complications from the disease at Salem Hospital, according to the Oregon Department ofCorrections.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2004
Craig Eisendrath One of the most damaging books in history was Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf, which in the early 1920s proclaimed Hitler's anti-Semitism, worship of power and strategy for world domination. Once in power, Hitler and his party, guided by this book, established the National Socialist regime, which led to the concentration camps and World War II. Craig Eisendrath wrote At War With Time: Western Thought From the Sages to the 21st Century and The Unifying Moment: The Psychological Philosophy of William James and Alfred North Whitehead.
TOPIC
By Ishmael Reed | May 30, 1999
THE LATEST SPATE of school shootings has been followed by the same vacuous media commentaries that accompanied earlier trag-edies. Generally, television and movies have gotten the blame for inspiring the young shooters.The commentators ignore the fact that during the nation's bloodiest century, the 19th, neither television nor radio was around when rival white ethnic gangsters in Northeastern cities littered the streets with corpses.On April 20 at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.
NEWS
By Sidney Zion | May 2, 1999
IN THE beginning, Cain slew Abel. So how come God didn't punish Adam and Eve? They had eaten the forbidden fruit and should have known that Cain had a serious case of sibling rivalry that might easily develop into fratricide. But the Lord, in His infinite wisdom, gave the first parents a pass, despite their obvious retreat into denial. Now, on the eve of the so-called 21st century, in the wake of the high school massacre in Colorado, President Clinton proposes felony prosecutions against parents who allow their children to have guns that end up causing death or injury.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
Reporter: I'm having lunch with Christopher Hitchens on Monday.Friend of Hitchens: Take your Alka-Seltzer.Reporter: Oh, I won't try to keep up with him.FOH: There's no question of one's keeping up with him.Reporter: I probably won't drink at all. I don't when I'm working.FOH: Then you won't have an authentic Christopher Hitchens experience.Reporter: Are you saying I should plan on taking the train, so I won't have to worry about driving back?FOH: I think that would be best. My authentic Christopher Hitchens experience begins in Timberlake's, an unpretentious place in Washington, where he has taught the bartender to make unassailable Tanqueray martinis.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 26, 1991
"Frontline's" "The Mind of Hussein" never quite lives up to the promise of its title. But the report, which airs at 9 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67), is still smart and engaging television.The topic is a fascinating one and about as timely as you can get. In terms of execution, there is some good research, and it is presented in a way that goes down easy.Host Hodding Carter admits almost nothing is known about Hussein's early years. But once the report gets to Hussein's teen years as a thug, it starts to rock and roll.
NEWS
August 27, 1996
Erwin Leiser,73, who was born in Berlin to Jewish parents, fled Hitler's Germany and went on to win praise for documentary filmmaking about the Nazi era, died of heart failure Thursday in Zurich, where he had lived since 1961.His documentary feature film about the history of Germany under Hitler, entitled "Mein Kampf," was composed of clips from old newsreels and film obtained from both Allied and German sources.The film appeared in 1960, went on to be shown in scores of countries -- it was a box-office hit even in West Germany -- and was applauded by the New York Times critic Vincent Canby as "an effective summation of the Nazi era as recorded on film."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 13, 1991
It may be hard to generate sympathy for anyone whose political message is of division and intolerance. But sadness may be appropriate for presidential candidate David Duke, as he emerges from a thoughtful two-part radio profile on the Baltimore-produced program "Soundprint" this weekend.In "David Duke's New Profile," at 6 tonight on WJHU-FM 88.1 (and distributed to American Public Radio stations around the nation), we get a glimpse of a lonely child whose friends were books and who joined the Ku Klux Klan to find a family.
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