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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 4, 1994
When Zubin Mehta and the Israel Philharmonic opened the last movement of Brahms' Symphony No. 2 Wednesday night at the Kennedy Center, one expected a disaster by the conclusion. The Bombay-born conductor and the orchestra of which he is music director for life seized the work by the throat. And continued to squeeze.What, one wondered, would they do when they got to the movement's coda, which calls for an acceleration into the composer's most blazing peroration. Could orchestra and conductor play any louder and go any faster?
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Josie Mehta, a retired registered nurse who had worked at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, died Sept. 1 of cancer at her Nottingham home. She was 61. The daughter of an insurance man and a homemaker, Josie Dela Cruz was born and raised in Virac, the Philippines, where she graduated from high school. After earning her nursing degree in 1972 from the University of Santo Thomas in the Philippines, she came to Baltimore the next year when she took a nursing job at the old Church Home Hospital.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 9, 1995
Richard Strauss may have written himself into the score as its protagonist, but the real hero of any performance of the composer's "Ein Heldenleben" ("A Hero's Life") is the conductor and his orchestra. In their performance of the piece Tuesday evening at the Kennedy Center, the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra and its music director, Zubin Mehta, covered themselves with glory.This warhorse is one of the great tests of any conductor and orchestra; it is long, demanding to play and hard to hold together.
FEATURES
May 4, 2006
Universal Pictures says it will donate $1.15 million this week toward a memorial to the passengers and crew who perished aboard United Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001 - addressing concerns of a lawmaker who has blocked legislation to buy land for the project. The donation from Universal, which last week released United 93, a film about the flight, brings to $9 million the private donations so far. Organizers hope to raise $30 million to build the memorial near Shanksville, Pa., where the plane crashed.
NEWS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBERG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBERG,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
Once upon a time, you could hit the Elkridge drive- in and see a good movie, grab a bag of popcorn and maybe spark the flame of a teen-age romance. These days, emotions derived from the lot are anything but romantic. On one end, a cluster of gutted trailers is king, while weeds, broken glass and trash fill the rest of the court. Kids come to the lot for mischievous evenings, not wholesome ones. Truckers, under cover of darkness, pull their 18-wheelers in for the night and leave their trash behind.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1995
Frustrated by a Columbia developer's failure to improve an Elkridge flea market site, Howard County planning and zoning officials have taken steps to revoke his special exception to operate the business.Last week, the county Department of Planning and Zoning filed a request to revoke Barry Mehta's special exception because he did not make required site improvements -- including paving or applying an asphalt preservative to the parking lot and providing better access to roads -- before opening the Elkridge flea market April 2."
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1994
Plans to build a flea market on the site of the former Elkridge Drive-In have angered a group of Elkridge residents who say such operations attract "unsavory people," generate trash and tie up traffic.Meanwhile, owners and developers Barry and Charu Mehta have agreed to let the Elkridge Business and Professional Association use the 17-acre site off Route 1 for a nominal fee for the Elkridge Days Carnival in June.The flea market is the latest proposal for the site owned by the Columbia developers.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1995
County zoning officials have forced a Columbia developer to close his weekend flea market until he complies with conditions of a special exception to operate the business.Barry Mehta -- who was defeated Saturday in his bid for a seat on the Columbia Council -- must make these improvements before he can reopen the flea market:* Submit a detailed plan to the county Department of Planning and Zoning.* Screen a trash can, now surrounded by a see-through fence.* Seek approval from the State Highway Administration for improvements to exit and entrance lanes.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1994
Grace Episcopal Church in Elkridge has agreed to market a portion of the former Elkridge Drive-In site, whose owners have had trouble developing the property as a retirement community.Owners and developers Barry and Charu Mehta of Columbia want to create a retirement community on their 17-acre site off Route 1 but have been unable to find a buyer."The church will help me," Mr. Mehta said. "The church will take the main responsibility of finding" interested developers.Mr. Mehta's plans to develop the property have long been a source of tension between him and some members of the Elkridge community.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
The Howard County Board of Appeals will decide next month whether the former site of the Elkridge Drive-In will remain a flea market.The Department of Planning and Zoning accused Columbia developer Barry Mehta -- who owns the 17-acre parcel off U.S. 1 and Bonnie View Lane -- of failing to make required site improvements, such as paving the parking lot and fencing the trash area.During a four-hour hearing on Tuesday, Mr. Mehta said he complied with the conditions of the special exception, but planning and zoning officials chose to interpret the conditions too strictly.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
A vacant, overgrown property on U.S. 1 in Howard County that has contributed for years to the old boulevard's worn-out appearance may be on the verge of a transformation - a possible foreshadowing of the community renaissance that local leaders are trying to engineer. Trustees for the 17 acres in Elkridge - once a drive-in theater - want to build restaurants, offices, a five-story hotel and nearly 370 apartments for senior citizens. Barry and Charu Mehta of Columbia, who bought the land in 1985 and later put it in a trust, have done little with the property beyond using it for a short-lived flea market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 2001
Continents of Exile: All for Love, by Ved Mehta. Thunder's Mouth Press/Nation Books. 345 pages. $24.95. All for Love, the new memoir by the long-time New Yorker writer Ved Mehta, works in the manner of an intellectual and emotional mystery novel, minus any crimes but the subtlest crimes of the heart. We read to discover why Mehta's love affairs (and by proxy, our own), are always on the verge of falling apart. Mehta, an expatriate from India, blind from the age of four, spent the 1960s researching and writing long pieces on India, religion, industry and whatever else struck his fancy for The New Yorker, but most of All For Love works as a bittersweet memoir of young love as it plays out in New York, London, Morocco and India.
NEWS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBERG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBERG,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
Once upon a time, you could hit the Elkridge drive- in and see a good movie, grab a bag of popcorn and maybe spark the flame of a teen-age romance. These days, emotions derived from the lot are anything but romantic. On one end, a cluster of gutted trailers is king, while weeds, broken glass and trash fill the rest of the court. Kids come to the lot for mischievous evenings, not wholesome ones. Truckers, under cover of darkness, pull their 18-wheelers in for the night and leave their trash behind.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 2, 2000
Director Xerxes Mehta has written that he considers Samuel Beckett's late plays "ghost-plays, hauntings." In keeping with this, there is a profound spookiness to the three short pieces he has mounted for the Maryland Stage Company, the professional company in residence at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. In Mehta's exacting production, the lighting, exquisitely designed by Terry Cobb, is as much a character as the actors. All three plays begin with the theater shrouded in darkness so deep it goes beyond black to bleak.
FEATURES
February 1, 2000
Fire sends Vonnegut to a N.Y. hospital A fire at Kurt Vonnegut's Manhattan home sent the 77-year-old author to the hospital suffering from smoke inhalation Sunday night and slightly damaged his four-story townhouse on East 48th Street. The cause of the blaze was under investigation, but fire marshals believe that careless smoking by Vonnegut may have played a role, said a fire official who spoke on condition of anonymity. Officials at Weill Cornell Center of New York-Presbyterian Hospital would not comment on Vonnegut's condition, but his 17-year-old daughter, Lily, said he was "OK," though he will probably remain hospitalized for a few days.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
The Howard County Board of Appeals will decide next month whether the former site of the Elkridge Drive-In will remain a flea market.The Department of Planning and Zoning accused Columbia developer Barry Mehta -- who owns the 17-acre parcel off U.S. 1 and Bonnie View Lane -- of failing to make required site improvements, such as paving the parking lot and fencing the trash area.During a four-hour hearing on Tuesday, Mr. Mehta said he complied with the conditions of the special exception, but planning and zoning officials chose to interpret the conditions too strictly.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1991
In a sparsely furnished office behind a crystal shop in downtown Reisterstown, Chandrakant Mehta is trying to develop an import-export business that will move items as diverse as used clothing, marble, crafts and plastics through the Port of Baltimore.His office furniture consists of two bare desks, a telephone and a fax machine. The computers have arrived. He hasn't hired his staff yet. And so far he has no local business links. But he is brimming with confidence."We see lots of opportunity, especially in the plastics technology," said Mehta, branch manager of Atlas Exports in the United States.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 24, 1991
Richard Strauss' "Salome" is the opera for people who hate opera -- it's non-stop action, violence and lurid sex in a single 90-minute act. It's as scary and bloody as the best Brian DePalma movies and as kitschy as one by Cecil B. DeMille -- Salome's striptease leads to the beheading of John the Baptist. No wonder sopranos, conductors and record companies love it.The latest entries in the "Salome" sweepstakes come from Deutsche Grammophon and Sony Classical. The former features Giuseppe Sinopoli conducting the orchestra of the German Opera of Berlin and a cast headed by the young American soprano, Cheryl Studer; the latter has Zubin Mehta conducting the Berlin Phiharmonic and a cast that stars Eva Marton in the title role.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1995
Frustrated by a Columbia developer's failure to improve an Elkridge flea market site, Howard County planning and zoning officials have taken steps to revoke his special exception to operate the business.Last week, the county Department of Planning and Zoning filed a request to revoke Barry Mehta's special exception because he did not make required site improvements -- including paving or applying an asphalt preservative to the parking lot and providing better access to roads -- before opening the Elkridge flea market April 2."
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1995
County zoning officials have forced a Columbia developer to close his weekend flea market until he complies with conditions of a special exception to operate the business.Barry Mehta -- who was defeated Saturday in his bid for a seat on the Columbia Council -- must make these improvements before he can reopen the flea market:* Submit a detailed plan to the county Department of Planning and Zoning.* Screen a trash can, now surrounded by a see-through fence.* Seek approval from the State Highway Administration for improvements to exit and entrance lanes.
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