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NEWS
May 12, 1995
POLICE LOG* Arnold : Someone took a white, four-megabyte Digital computer from a classroom at Anne Arundel Community College between 4 p.m. April 28 and 9 a.m. Tuesday. The item is valued at $1,099.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 23, 2007
For 94 years, model railroad fans have trekked to North Gay and Saratoga streets to purchase equipment and supplies at M.B. Klein for their own miniature basement versions of the Baltimore & Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, New Haven & Hartford and Santa Fe railroads - or any other line, large or small, that catches their modeling fancy. And now, the 19th- century, two-story brick building that dispensed such merriment and pleasure for decades is shuttered while waiting for the wrecking cranes of developer Richard W. Naing to show up and clear the site for a 40- to 60-story building he plans to build there.
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BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | November 28, 1990
New generations of high-capacity diskette drives are on the horizon, including optical diskettes, magnetic floppy disks and hybrids called "floptical" drives.A number of companies, including International Business Machines Corp., are testing a 3.5-inch internal diskette drive that can read and write 2.88 megabytes of data on a single diskette -- twice the capacity of the current standard and eight times the capacity of the drive used in the original IBM PC.The only computer to use such a drive currently is a Unix-based work station made by Next Inc.Although the 2.88MB drives were working well in tests at the annual Comdex/Fall trade show in Las Vegas earlier this month, it may a year or two before they become adopted widely.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
To look at the smile on Paul Doherty's face, it would seem that the box he heaved atop the counter at M.B. Klein's model train shop in Baltimore was for him. But this isn't so much about Doherty. This is about the Christmas when his 5-year-old son Connor comes of age and no longer has to rely on his father's old model rail system. "I got one when I was 10," Doherty, 38, said with the kind of grin that children give when they pull away the wrapper off a gift. "I still have that, and he plays with that.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | May 16, 1994
One of the most frequent complaints I get from people who bought computers two or three years ago is that they're out of disk space.Many of those machines came with 40- or 80-megabyte hard drives, which seemed copious at the time but are now bulging with the bloated programs and data files that software publishers insist that we need. Today's low-end machines typically come with 170- or 200-megabyte drives, but even those can fill up quickly.Although I'm accustomed to rapid changes in technology, this explosion in disk space -- and disk requirements -- still amazes me.The first computer I bought 11 years ago didn't have a disk drive at all. It stored programs and data on a cassette recorder, which had the advantage of being cheap but the disadvantage of being outrageously slow and not at all reliable.
BUSINESS
By Sean Silverthorne and Sean Silverthorne,Palo Alto Peninsula Times Tribune | March 2, 1992
Although computers have become easier to use, buying them is as complicated as ever, especially for the first-time purchaser.That's because options are as varied and numerous as Democratic presidential candidates. Should I make do with a 286 computer or go with a more powerful 386 or even 486? Is a 40-megabyte hard disk sufficient? How much memory isenough?During the 1980s, those decisions were fairly easy to make if you were in the market for an IBM-compatible personal computer (Apple products live by their own rules)
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL STROH and MICHAEL STROH,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1999
When is a megabyte not a megabyte?It may sound like the setup to the latest nerd joke -- except that some people in the high-tech world aren't laughing.In their never-ending battle against imprecision, the folks who set standards for the electronics industry have taken aim at the most bandied about words at your local CompUSA: kilobyte, megabyte and gigabyte.It turns out the terms traditionally used to measure memory or hard drive space inside a computer aren't as accurate as they should be. Now the International Electrotechnical Commission, a little-known standards making body in Geneva, has adopted some new ones.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | October 17, 1990
After months of speculation, Apple Computer Inc. finally unveiled three new models of the Macintosh Monday, including the first Macintosh to carry a list price of less than $1,000 and a low-cost color Macintosh.The new models are the vanguard of an aggressive campaign by the Cupertino, Calif., company to increase its share of the personal computer market.According to Apple, the new Macintoshes are priced as much as 60 percent lower than earlier Macs of comparable power.Apple is hoping the new machines will provide a compelling alternative to low-cost IBM-style PCs equipped with Microsoft's Windows 3.0 software, which mimics the graphical user interface of the Macintosh, making programs easier to learn and to use.Two of the computers introduced Monday, the Macintosh Classic and the Macintosh IIsi, are available now. The third, and perhaps most intriguing of the Macs, called the MacintoshLC, will not be available until early next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2000
If you just bought a $1,000 digital camera that takes 3.3 megapixel pictures, you might have thought you had everything you needed to get started with your new hobby. But it doesn't take long to discover that it's too easy to run out of digital "film," and that getting those huge photos from your camera to your computer can be a real headache. Luckily, a trip back to the computer or photo store will turn up some accessories that make life easier - higher-capacity digital film cards for storing your pictures and dedicated digital film readers that plug into your PC and help transfer photographs to your computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington | October 2, 2003
Combo drive from Samsung has plenty of speed to burn Speed counts when you're burning a bunch of CD-Rs of holiday or special event pictures for family and friends. I've been moving at 16X for about two years - daunted by the price of faster CD-writing drives. But the time has come to upgrade and the Samsung SM-352 Combo Drive ($80) is an excellent investment if your computer needs a new burner to take the place of the old 8X or 16X burners that were state of the art shortly after the last millennium ended.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2004
There are two kinds of computer users - those who've lost some irreplaceable files and those who will. There's only one defense - backing up the data. Too bad it's one of the most tedious tasks in computing. Still, it's getting better, thanks to cheaper CD burning, better backup software and the spread of broadband Internet services. A decade ago, it took a patient soul to back up a 100- megabyte hard drive onto a stack of 1.4-megabyte floppy disks. The coming of the CD burner would have made our lives easier, except that hard drives have gotten a lot bigger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington | October 2, 2003
Combo drive from Samsung has plenty of speed to burn Speed counts when you're burning a bunch of CD-Rs of holiday or special event pictures for family and friends. I've been moving at 16X for about two years - daunted by the price of faster CD-writing drives. But the time has come to upgrade and the Samsung SM-352 Combo Drive ($80) is an excellent investment if your computer needs a new burner to take the place of the old 8X or 16X burners that were state of the art shortly after the last millennium ended.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2001
The opening of Mega*Bytes Cafe wasn't grand. One day in late January, there was a foldable sign placed at the edge of the entrance to Gateway Plaza announcing "Mega Bytes Cafe, now open." And there won't be any fliers in the newspaper or mailboxes announcing the new lunchtime hangout where customers find pizza, Panini and portabello under one roof. Owner Michael Stratigareas says he expects his customers will come with recommendations from their co-workers at the water cooler. "They'll find us, I know they will," Stratigareas said, a big smile easing across his face.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 2001
Just opened Jan. 22, the Mega*Bytes restaurant in Columbia has attitude. It consciously strives to bridge the digital cultural divide between serving food and the high-tech businesses it has for neighbors offering open, industrial-style decor and an eclectic menu. "We open early for people who want a quick bite for breakfast," says Mike Strati, part of the Hunter's Lodge Group, which owns Mega*Bytes. "And we stay open until 7 for people who have to work late and want to grab something decent to eat."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2000
If you just bought a $1,000 digital camera that takes 3.3 megapixel pictures, you might have thought you had everything you needed to get started with your new hobby. But it doesn't take long to discover that it's too easy to run out of digital "film," and that getting those huge photos from your camera to your computer can be a real headache. Luckily, a trip back to the computer or photo store will turn up some accessories that make life easier - higher-capacity digital film cards for storing your pictures and dedicated digital film readers that plug into your PC and help transfer photographs to your computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,BOSTON GLOBE | October 2, 2000
My lucky streak with hard drives finally has run out. In my 15 years with personal computers, I've heard stories about the devastation caused by broken hard drives. And though a thousand disks fell to the left and the right, none came near me. Then in August, the drive in my iMac succumbed. And in New Jersey last weekend, I replaced a dead drive in my brother-in-law's nearly new Gateway PC. That got my attention. I've got a lot of valuable stuff tucked away on my main home computer, and the two hard drives inside have seen a couple of years of hard service.
BUSINESS
By Lawrence J. Magid and Lawrence J. Magid,1991 Los Angeles Times Syndicate, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | May 6, 1991
IBM, AT&T and Toshiba have recently introduced high-end notebook PCs that deliver desktop computing power on the go. All three are easy to carry, but at $5,000 and up, they're heavy on the budget.All are equipped with the Intel 386SX central processing unit (CPU) -- a slightly slower version of Intel's mainstream 386 CPU. They can run virtually any IBM-compatible software including Microsoft Windows, OS/2 and the most demanding desktop publishing, graphic and computer-aided design programs.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis | October 9, 1995
SOMEWHERE ON MY desk, probably only a few inches beneath the software packages, overnight mail envelopes, old coffee cups and last week's unopened mail, is a faxed news release declaring October to be National Clean Up Your Office Month.Here it is, on the floor. It is actually "National Clean Your Flies Month."Oops, one of the words was obscured by a coffee stain. It is really "National Clean Your Files Month."A cynic might suggest that National Clean Up Your Files Month is merely a marketing ploy by Fuji Photo Film U.S.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | August 21, 2000
The new 4x4x24 backpack USB CD-rewriter from the CD-RW pioneers at Micro Solutions Inc. shines in the areas of reliability, speed and convenience. If that isn't the proverbial better mousetrap, what is? Beat a path through the cornfields and snap up the DeKalb, Ill.-based company's latest offering, and you'll find substantial new powers to create data CDs, turn out customized music CDs playable in ordinary stereos and back up entire operating systems. The USB connector makes this device hot pluggable, which means you can plug it into one computer, fill it up with all the files in that machine and then plug it into another PC and download it all at the 24x speeds common in today's better CD-ROM drives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dwight Silverman and Dwight Silverman,Houston Chronicle | March 22, 1999
Having some form of large, removable storage on a personal computer is becoming more and more crucial. Though it remains an important part of any PC, the standard 1.44-megabyte floppy drive no longer has the capacity for what many people are doing with their systems these days.The plummeting price of hardware has made removable storage much more affordable, in many different forms. However, there's not yet a defining standard that is as ubiquitous as the floppy, so you'll have to choose based on what's best for your needs.
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