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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2000
MedStar Health, the Columbia-based nonprofit that is already the largest hospital group in the area, said yesterday that it will take over financially troubled Georgetown University Hospital in Washington. Under an agreement with Georgetown University, MedStar will pay $80 million -- roughly the amount of the hospital's debt -- and as much as $70 million more if it meets future earnings targets. With Georgetown, MedStar will have 2,900 beds, annual revenue of $1.85 billion and 22,100 employees.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 26, 2014
MedStar Health plans to open its new hybrid health care facility off Key Highway in the Federal Hill-Locust Point area July 7 that will offer both urgent care and doctor appointments.   The hospital chain already has a similar facility in Mitchellville and plans and third in Bel Air. Officials believe such "one-stop shops" will be convenient for patients and a good business model for them. More than 25,000 people are expected to use the facility in the first year, either for urgent care or for medical services in the areas of primary care, orthopedics and sports medicine, cardiology or obstetrics-gynecology.
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BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | April 8, 2008
Doctors with Columbia's MedStar Health soon will provide urgent care services at area Rite Aid stores, through a partnership the organizations plan to announce today. Starting this summer, MedStar PromptCare clinics will roll out in four drugstores, two in the Baltimore region and two in the Washington area. The companies hope to add 12 more programs nationwide after studying results of the pilot program. "Health care has been late to having a consumer focus, and consumers are increasingly demanding service in a variety of settings that are much more convenient," said Eric R. Wagner, a senior vice president of managed care for MedStar, a nonprofit.
HEALTH
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
The Baltimore region's likely first baby of the year is a girl born seven minutes after midnight Wednesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson. The hospital said Brooklyn Jane Branton, daughter of Hanover residents David and Dolly Branton, weighs five pounds, 13 ounces. She arrived nearly a month early, but both she and her mother are doing well, GBMC said. "I'm so excited," Dolly Branton said in a statement. "I never thought that Brooklyn would be born on New Year's Day. God knows what he is doing.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
Johns Hopkins has made "a business-like offer" for the nearby campus of Church Hospital as a site for future expansion, Ronald R. Peterson, president of the Johns Hopkins Health System, said yesterday.MedStar Health, which owns Church, is reviewing the Hopkins offer but "won't rule out going out with a request for other proposals," said John Marzano, a MedStar spokesman.Church occupies two city blocks just south of Hopkins on Broadway in East Baltimore. MedStar announced Wednesday that it will close the hospital this fall, and a nursing home and assisted living facility by June.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2001
MedStar Health is asking a court to block new open-heart surgery regulations, charging that the Maryland Health Care Commission "arbitrarily and capriciously `cooked the books' " to justify an additional open-heart program in Maryland's Washington suburbs. MedStar, with headquarters in Columbia, owns seven hospitals, including Washington Hospital Center, which runs the dominant heart surgery program in the District of Columbia and its Maryland suburbs. MedStar also does open-heart surgery at Georgetown University Hospital, and is hoping for that program to grow.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | January 25, 2008
Kenneth A. Samet and MedStar Health more or less grew up together. When Samet was a graduate student in hospital administration in 1982, part of his training was to work with John P. McDaniel, who was then running Washington Hospital Center in the District of Columbia. As Washington Hospital Center grew into seven-hospital MedStar and the region's largest health system with McDaniel as chief executive officer, Samet moved into positions of increasing authority. He was chief operating officer for the past 10 years and president for five.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Church Hospital -- Baltimore's second-oldest and the building where Edgar Allan Poe died and Union soldiers wounded on Pratt Street in the beginning of the Civil War were treated -- will close its doors this fall.In the shadow of its world-class neighbor, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Church served the East Baltimore community, particularly the elderly, for 142 years, earning a reputation for caring and homeyness. Over time, however, families that traditionally turned to it began moving to the suburbs, leaving it with empty beds and lower income.
NEWS
April 22, 2003
N. Arundel Hospital receives laboratory accreditation North Arundel Hospital's laboratory has been awarded a two-year accreditation by the Commission on Laboratory Accreditation of the College of American Pathologists. The laboratory is inspected every two years. The College of American Pathologists is an organization of more than 15,000 physicians and laboratory technicians. MedStar Research wins five-year NIH contract MedStar Research Institute and the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Aging recently signed a five-year contract for MedStar to provide research support services for the clinical research program of the Institute on Aging at its recently opened clinical center unit at Harbor Hospital.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1999
MedStar Health has accepted Johns Hopkins Health System's offer to buy the nearby campus of Church Hospital for an undisclosed sum, the two health systems confirmed yesterday.The deal is scheduled to close 30 days after a due diligence period, during which Hopkins will evaluate any environmental or other risks associated with the property, said Gary Stephenson, a Hopkins spokesman.Church occupies two city blocks just south of Hopkins on Broadway in East Baltimore.Hopkins started using the campus' parking garage and parking lots this week.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
MedStar Health has laid off 74 people in its real estate and facilities management departments as the hospital system transfers those functions to a contractor, which plans to hire back the workers, Medstar officials said. The Columbia-based company cut 19 jobs at MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital, 29 jobs at MedStar Harbor Hospital and 26 jobs at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, according to a notice provided to the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation. MedStar said in a statement it has hired real estate firm CBRE to handle its facilities management and real estate services.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Columbia-based MedStar Health has shed about 1 percent of its work force at its four Baltimore-area hospitals over the past year, less than the layoffs of about 5 percent of its employees at MedStar Washington Hospital Center announced this week, officials said. Most of the 100 Baltimore job losses were through attrition, with a small number of layoffs, MedStar spokeswoman Ann Nickels said. The system's Baltimore-area hospitals, MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, MedStar Harbor Hospital, MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital and MedStar Franklin Square Hospital, employ 10,177 people, she said.
HEALTH
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
The competition for medical dollars within the Baltimore-Washington area got a national radio audience this morning, when NPR aired a story about plans for two proton beam therapy facilities in the District of Columbia. If built, those facilities -- proposed by the Johns Hopkins and MedStar medical systems -- would compete with a facility already under construction in downtown Baltimore, known as the Maryland Proton Treatment Center . Here's what The Baltimore Sun's Andrea K. Walker wrote about that Baltimore proton beam facility last year:   When completed in 2014, the treatment center will offer a form of cancer therapy growing in popularity that more precisely targets radiation to tumors, resulting in fewer side effects such as damage to other organs.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 29, 2013
 MedStar Harbor Hospital is the new home to a family of Mallards. Ten baby mallards hatched from eggs today in the courtyard of the South Baltimore hospital where their mom sought refuge a couple of weeks ago. The mother had been very protective of her babies and hospital staff couldn't even get close enough to see how many eggs were in her nest until they hatched, said hospital spokeswoman Debra Schindler. The daddy mallard could be seen today bringing the babies food, Schindler said.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | December 20, 2012
Even as the future of health care and how it will be provided and paid for remain a subject of much discussion at many levels thanks to the enactment of the federal health care reform law that has come to be called ObamaCare by critics and supporters alike, private health care businesses have been pressing ahead with some rather large scale plans. It's hard to drive into east Baltimore without noticing the massive overhaul that is coming to fruition at the already gigantic Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
MedStar Health plans to build a $30 million medical plaza in Bel Air as it tries to capitalize on the area's growing population, company officials said Monday. The hospital operator also said it plans to expand the neonatal intensive care unit at its Franklin Square Hospital Center in eastern Baltimore County. The addition of the 100,000-square-foot medical plaza at Plum Tree Road and Route 924 in a growing commercial area of Bel Air in Harford County would offer patients a variety of medical services in one venue.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
MedStar Health said yesterday that it is considering options for Church Hospital in East Baltimore, including closing it, selling it or consolidating services.The hospital reported $3.4 million in operating losses for the 12 months that ended March 30. Licensed for 144 beds, it had 64 patients on an average day last year -- so few as to make efficient operation difficult.The Church campus also includes 115 assisted-living beds, with an occupancy of 92 percent of capacity, and a 121-bed skilled nursing center, which is 98 percent filled.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
A Howard County Circuit Court judge refused to block yesterday the creation of another open-heart surgery program in Maryland's Washington suburbs. MedStar Health, based in Columbia, filed suit in May last year in an attempt to keep the Maryland Health Care Commission from adding another program. MedStar, with headquarters in Columbia, owns seven hospitals, including Washington Hospital Center, which runs the dominant heart surgery program in the District of Columbia and its Maryland suburbs.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
MedStar Harborview Sports Medicine and Running Maryland are partnering to offer a free injury assessment clinic for runners next week, according to a news release. Appointments are suggested, but not necessary for the clinic, which is scheduled for Nov. 13 from 4 to 6:30 p.m. at MedStar Harborview Sports Medicine (2900 S. Hanover St., Baltimore, MD 21225). "The majority of running injuries result from some combination of strength and flexibility deficits, biomechanical problems and training errors.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2012
Jameel McClain knows what it feels like to be "dinged," or hit so hard in the head that he felt dizzy. It was his rookie year with the Ravens, and he said he ran down the field straight into three offensive linemen. Team doctors kept him out of the game until he was more himself. But that caution was not always the way for the Ravens or the National Football League, where McClain said players have embraced the ethic of playing through pain. That has trickled down to many youth leagues where the long-term damage inflicted by concussions has also been ignored.
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